• We use a sample of 4178 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 3, 4 and 5 in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field to investigate the relationship between the observed slope of the stellar continuum emission in the ultraviolet, {\beta}, and the thermal dust emission, as quantified via the so-called 'infrared excess' (IRX = LIR/LUV). Through a stacking analysis we directly measure the 850-{\mu}m flux density of LBGs in our deep (0.9mJy) James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 850-{\mu}m map, as well as deep public Herschel/SPIRE 250-, 350- and 500-{\mu}m imaging. We establish functional forms for the IRX-{\beta} relation to z ~ 5, confirming that there is no significant redshift evolution of the relation and that the resulting average IRX-{\beta} curve is consistent with a Calzetti-like attenuation law. We compare our results with recent work in the literature, finding that discrepancies in the slope of the IRX-{\beta} relation are driven by biases in the methodology used to determine the ultraviolet slopes. Consistent results are found when IRX-{\beta} is evaluated by stacking in bins of stellar mass, M, and we argue that the near-linear IRX-M relationship is a better proxy for correcting observed UV luminosities to total star formation rates, provided an accurate handle on M can be had, and also gives clues as to the physical driver of the role of dust-obscured star formation in high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present a new measurement of the evolving galaxy far-IR luminosity function (LF) extending out to redshifts z~5, with resulting implications for the level of dust-obscured star-formation density in the young Universe. To achieve this we have exploited recent advances in sub-mm/mm imaging with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), which together provide unconfused imaging with sufficient dynamic range to provide meaningful coverage of the luminosity-redshift plane out to z>4. Our results support previous indications that the faint-end slope of the far-IR LF is sufficiently flat that comoving luminosity-density is dominated by bright objects (~L*). However, we find that the number-density/luminosity of such sources at high redshifts has been severely over-estimated by studies that have attempted to push the highly-confused Herschel SPIRE surveys beyond z~2. Consequently we confirm recent reports that cosmic star-formation density is dominated by UV-visible star formation at z>4. Using both direct (1/Vmax) and maximum likelihood determinations of the LF, we find that its high-redshift evolution is well characterized by continued positive luminosity evolution coupled with negative density evolution (with increasing redshift). This explains why bright sub-mm sources continue to be found at z>5, even though their integrated contribution to cosmic star-formation density at such early times is very small. The evolution of the far-IR galaxy LF thus appears similar in form to that already established for active galactic nuclei, possibly reflecting a similar dependence on the growth of galaxy mass.
  • We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • Motivated by the current controversy over the redshift distribution and physical properties of luminous (sub-)mm sources, we have undertaken a new study of the brightest sample of unlensed (sub-)mm sources with pre-ALMA interferometric follow-up in the COSMOS field. Exploiting the very latest multi-frequency supporting data, we find that this sample displays a redshift distribution indistinguishable from that of the lensed sources uncovered with the South Pole Telescope (SPT), with z_median ~ 3.5. We also find that, over the redshift range z ~ 2-6 the median stellar mass of the most luminous (sub-)mm sources is M_* ~ 3 * 10^11 M_odot, yielding a typical specific star-formation rate sSFR ~ 3 Gyr^-1. Consistent with recent ALMA and SMA studies, we confirm that source blending is not a serious issue in the study of luminous (sub-)mm sources uncovered by ground-based, single-dish surveys; only ~ 10-15% of bright (S_850 ~ 5 - 10 mJy) (sub-)mm sources arise from significant (i.e. >20%) blends, and so our conclusions are largely unaffected by whether we adopt the original single-dish mm/sub-mm flux-densities/positions, or the interferometric data. Our results suggest that apparent disagreements over the redshift distribution of (sub-)mm sources are a result of "down-sizing" in dust-enshrouded star-formation, consistent with existing knowledge of the star-formation histories of massive galaxies. They also indicate that extreme star-forming galaxies at high redshift are, on average, subject to the same star-formation rate-limiting processes as less luminous objects, and lie on the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies at z>3.