• We present the results of a two-year, multisite observing campaign investigating the high-amplitude delta Scuti star VX Hydrae during the 2006 and 2007 observing seasons. The final data set consists of nearly 8500 V-band observations spanning HJD 2453763.6 to 2454212.7 (2006 January 28 to 2007 April 22). Separate analyses of the two individual seasons of data yield 25 confidently-detected frequencies common to both data sets, of which two are pulsation modes, and the remaining 23 are Fourier harmonics or beat frequencies of these two modes. The 2006 data set had five additional frequencies with amplitudes less than 1.5 mmag, and the 2007 data had one additional frequency. Analysis of the full 2006-2007 data set yields 22 of the 25 frequencies found in the individual seasons of data. There are no significant peaks in the spectrum other than these between 0 and 60 c/d. The frequencies of the two main pulsation modes derived from the 2006 and 2007 observing seasons individually do not differ at the level of 3-sigma, and thus we find no conclusive evidence for period change over the span of these observations. However, the amplitude of f(1) = 5.7898 c/d changed significantly between the two seasons, while the amplitude of f(0) = 4.4765 c/d remained constant; amplitudes of the Fourier harmonics and beat frequencies of f(1) also changed. Similar behavior was seen in the 1950s, and it is clear that VX Hydrae undergoes significant amplitude changes over time.
  • The cataclysmic variable ASAS J002511+1217.2 was discovered in outburst by the All-Sky Automated Survey in September 2004, and intensively monitored by AAVSO observers through the following two months. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate that this is a very short-period system. Clearly defined superhumps with a period of 0.05687 +/- 0.00001 days (1-sigma) are present during the superoutburst, 5 to 18 days following the ASAS detection. We observe a change in superhump profile similar to the transition to ``late superhumps'' observed in other short-period systems; the superhump period appears to increase slightly for a time before returning to the original value, with the resulting superhump phase offset by approximately half a period. We detect variations with a period of 0.05666 +/- 0.00003 days (1-sigma) during the four-day quiescent phase between the end of the main outburst and the single echo outburst. Weak variations having the original superhump period reappear during the echo and its rapid decline. Time-resolved spectroscopy conducted nearly 30 days after detection and well into the decline yields an orbital period measurement of 82 +/- 5 minutes. Both narrow and broad components are present in the emission line spectra, indicating the presence of multiple emission regions. The weight of the observational evidence suggests that ASAS J002511+1217.2 is a WZ Sge-type dwarf nova, and we discuss how this system fits into the WZ classification scheme.
  • Stellar evolution theory predicts that asymptotic giant branch stars undergo a series of short thermal pulses that significantly change their luminosity and mass on timescales of hundreds to thousands of years. Secular changes in these stars resulting from thermal pulses can be detected as measurable changes in period if the star is undergoing Mira pulsations. The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) International Database currently contains visual data for over 1500 Mira variables. Light curves for these stars span nearly a century in some cases, making it possible to study the secular evolution of the pulsation behavior on these timescales. In this paper, we present the results of our study of period change in 547 Mira variables using data from the AAVSO. We find non-zero rates of period change, dlnP/dt, at the 2-sigma significance level in 57 of the 547 stars, at the 3-sigma level in 21 stars, and at the level of 6-sigma or greater in eight of the 547. The latter eight stars have been previously noted in the literature, and our derived rates of period changes largely agree with published values. The largest and most statistically significant dlnP/dt are consistent with the rates of period change expected during thermal pulses on the AGB. A number of other stars exhibit non-monotonic period changes on decades-long timescales, the cause of which is not yet known.
  • We assess the potential of asteroseismology for determining the fundamental properties of individual $\delta$ Scuti stars. We computed a grid of evolution and adiabatic pulsation models using the Yale Rotating Evolution Code to study the systematic changes in low-order ($\ell = 0, 1, 2,$ and 3) modes as functions of fundamental stellar properties. Changes to the stellar mass, chemical composition, and convective core overshooting length change the observable pulsation spectrum significantly. In general, mass has the strongest effect on evolution and on pulsation, followed by the metal abundance. Changes to the helium content have very little effect on the frequencies until near the end of the main sequence. Changes to each of the four parameters change the $p$-mode frequencies more, both in absolute and relative terms, than they do the $g$- and mixed-mode frequencies, suggesting that these parameters have a greater effect on the outer layers of the star. We also present evolution and pulsation models of the well-studied star FG Virginis, outlining a possible method of locating favorable models in the stellar parameter space based upon a definitive identification of only two modes. Specifically, we plot evolution models on the (period-period ratio) and (temperature-period ratio) planes to select candidate models, and modify the core overshooting parameter to fit the observed star. For these tests, we adjusted only the mass, helium and metal abundances, and core overshooting parameter, but this method can be extended to include the effects of first-order rotational splitting and second-order rotational distortion of pulsation spectra.