• WD0137-349 is a white dwarf-brown dwarf binary system in a 116 minute orbit. We present radial velocity observations and multiwaveband photometry from V, R and I in the optical, to J, H and Ks in the near-IR and [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] microns in the mid-IR. The photometry and lightcurves show variability in all wavebands, with the amplitude peaking at [4.5] microns, where the system is also brightest. Fluxes and brightness temperatures were computed for the heated and unheated atmosphere of the brown dwarf (WD0137-349B) using synthetic spectra of the white dwarf using model atmosphere simulations. We show that the flux from the brown dwarf dayside is brighter than expected in the Ks and [4.5] micron bands when compared to models of irradiated brown dwarfs with full energy circulation and suggest this over-luminosity may be attributed to H2 fluorescence or H3+ being generated in the atmosphere by the UV irradiation.
  • Favored theories of giant planet formation center around two main paradigms, namely the core accretion model and the gravitational instability model. These two formation scenarios support the hypothesis that the giant planet metallicities should be higher or equal to that of the parent star. Meanwhile, spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter HD189733b suggest that carbon and oxygen abundances range from depleted to enriched with respect to the star. Here, using a model describing the formation sequence and composition of planetesimals in the protoplanetary disk, we determine the range of volatile abundances in the envelope of HD189733b that is consistent with the 20--80 Earth-masses of heavy elements estimated to be present in the planet's envelope. We then compare the inferred carbon and oxygen abundances to those retrieved from spectroscopy and we find a range of supersolar values that directly fit both spectra and internal structure models. In some cases, we find that the apparent contradiction between the subsolar elemental abundances and the {mass of heavy elements predicted in HD189733b by internal structure models} can be explained by the presence of large amounts of carbon molecules in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soots in the upper layers of the envelope, as suggested by recent photochemical models. A diagnostic test that would confirm the presence of these compounds in the envelope is the detection of acetylene.
  • We develop a new 1D photochemical kinetics code to address stratospheric chemistry and stratospheric heating in hot Jupiters. Here we address optically active S-containing species and CO2 at 1200 < T < 2000 K. HS (mercapto) and S2 are highly reactive species that are generated photochemically and thermochemically from H2S with peak abundances between 1-10 mbar. S2 absorbs UV between 240 and 340 nm and is optically thick for metallicities [SH] > 0 at T > 1200 K. HS is probably more important than S2, as it is generally more abundant than S2 under hot Jupiter conditions and it absorbs at somewhat redder wavelengths. We use molecular theory to compute an HS absorption spectrum from sparse available data and find that HS should absorb strongly between 300 and 460 nm, with absorption at the longer wavelengths being temperature sensitive. When the two absorbers are combined, radiative heating (per kg of gas) peaks at 100 microbars, with a total stratospheric heating of about 8 x 10^4 W/m^2 for a jovian planet orbiting a solar-twin at 0.032 AU. Total heating is insensitive to metallicity. The CO2 mixing ratio is a well-behaved quadratic function of metallicity, ranging from 1.6 x 10^-8 to 1.6 x 10^-4 for -0.3 < [M/H] < 1.7. CO2 is insensitive to insolation, vertical mixing, temperature (1200 < T <2000 K), and gravity. The photochemical calculations confirm that CO2 should prove a useful probe of planetary metallicity.
  • We present new infrared spectra of the T8 brown dwarf 2MASS J04151954-0935066: 2.9-4.1 micron spectra obtained with the Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope, and 5.2-14.5 micron spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We use these data and models to determine an accurate bolometric luminosity of log L_bol/L_sun=-5.67 and to constrain the effective temperature, gravity, mass and age to 725-775K, log g=5.00-5.37, M=33-58 M_Jupiter and age=3-10Gyr. We perform the same analysis using published 0.6-15 micron spectra for the T7.5 dwarf 2MASS J12171110-0311131, for which we find a metal-rich composition ([Fe/H]~0.3) and log L_bol/L_sun=-5.31, T_eff=850-950K, log g=4.80-5.42, M=25-66M_Jupiter and age=1-10Gyr. These luminosities and effective temperatures straddle those determined with the same method and models for Gl 570D by Saumon et al. (2006) and make 2MASS J04151954-0935066 the coolest and least luminous T dwarf with well-determined properties. We find that synthetic spectra generated by the models reproduce the observed red through mid-infrared spectra of 2MASS J04151954-0935066 and 2MASS J12171110-0311131 very well, except for known discrepancies which are most likely due to the incomplete CH4 opacities. Both objects show evidence of departures from strict chemical equilibrium and we discuss this result in the context of other late T dwarfs where disequilibrium phenomena have been observed.
  • Traditional thermal evolution models of giant planets employ arbitrary initial conditions selected more for computational expediency than physical accuracy. Since the initial conditions are eventually forgotten by the evolving planet, this approach is valid for mature planets, if not young ones. To explore the evolution at young ages of jovian mass planets we have employed model planets created by one implementation of the core accretion mechanism as initial conditions for evolutionary calculations. We find that young jovian planets are smaller, cooler, and several to 100 times less luminous than predicted by earlier models. Furthermore the time interval during which the young jupiters are fainter than expected depends on the mass of planet. Jupiter mass planets (1 M_J) align with the conventional model luminosity in as little at 20 million years, but 10 M_J planets can take up to 1 billion years to match commonly cited luminosities, given our implementation of the core accretion mechanism. If our assumptions, especially including our treatment of the accretion shock, are correct, then young jovian planets are substantially fainter at young ages than currently believed. These results have important consequences both for detection strategies and for assigning masses to young jovian planets based on observed luminosities.
  • We have conducted a photometric monitoring program of 3 field late-L brown dwarfs looking for evidence of non-axisymmetric structure or temporal variability in their photospheres. The observations were performed using Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 and 8 micron bandpasses and were designed to cover at least one rotational period of each object. One-sigma RMS (root mean squared) uncertainties of less than 3 mmag at 4.5 micron and around 9 mmag at 8 micron were achieved. Two out of the three objects studied exhibit some modulation in their light curves at 4.5 micron - but not 8 micron - with periods of 7.4 hr and 4.6 hr and peak-to-peak amplitudes of 10 mmag and 8 mmag. Although the lack of detectable 8 micron variation suggests an instrumental origin for the detected variations, the data may nevertheless still be consistent with intrinsic variability since the shorter wavelength IRAC bandpasses probe more deeply into late L dwarf atmospheres than the longer wavelengths. A cloud feature occupying a small percentage (1-2 %) of the visible hemisphere could account for the observed amplitude of variation. If, instead, the variability is indeed instrumental in origin, then our non-variable L dwarfs could be either completely covered with clouds or objects whose clouds are smaller and uniformly distributed. Such scenarios would lead to very small photometric variations. Followup IRAC photometry at 3.6 and 5.8 micron bandpasses should distinguish between the two cases. In any event, the present observations provide the most sensitive search to date for structure in the photospheres of late-L dwarfs at mid-IR wavelengths, and our photometry provides stringent upper limits to the extent to which the photospheres of these transition L dwarfs are structured.
  • We present a low-resolution (R = 90), 5.5-38 micron spectral sequence of a sample of M, L, and T dwarfs obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra exhibit prominent absorption bands of H_2O at 6.27 microns, CH_4 at 7.65 microns, and NH_3 at 10.5 microns and are relatively featureless at lambda > 15 microns. Three spectral indices that measure the strengths of these bands are presented; H_2O absorption features are present throughout the MLT sequence while the CH_4 and NH_3 bands first appear at roughly the L/T transition. Although the spectra are, in general, qualitatively well matched by synthetic spectra that include the formation of spatially homogeneous silicate and iron condensate clouds, the spectra of the mid-type L dwarfs show an unexpected flattening from roughly 9 to 11 microns. We hypothesize that this may be a result of a population of small silicate grains that are not predicted in the cloud models. The spectrum of the peculiar T6 dwarf 2MASS J0937+2931 is suppressed from 5.5-7.5 microns relative to typical T6 dwarfs and may be a consequence of its mildly metal-poor/high surface gravity atmosphere. Finally, we compute bolometric luminosities of a subsample of the M, L, and T dwarfs by combining the IRS spectra with previously published 0.6-4.1 micron spectra and find good agreement with the values of Golimowski et al. who use L'- and M'-band photometry and to account for the flux emitted at lambda > 2.5 microns.
  • We present the first analysis of an optical to mid-infrared spectrum of the T7.5 dwarf Gliese 570D with model atmospheres, synthetic spectra, and brown dwarf evolution sequences. We obtain precise values for the basic parameters of Gl 570D: Teff=800 - 820K, log g (cm/s^2)=5.09 - 5.23, and log L/Lsun= -5.525 to -5.551. The Spitzer IRS spectrum shows prominent features of ammonia (NH3) that can only be fitted by reducing the abundance of NH3 by about one order of magnitude from the value obtained with chemical equilibrium models. We model departures from chemical equilibrium in the atmosphere of Gl 570D by considering the kinetics of nitrogen and carbon chemistry in the presence of vertical mixing. The resulting model spectrum reproduces the data very well.
  • We present new self-consistent atmosphere models for transiting planets TrES-1 and HD209458b. The planets were recently observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope in bands centered on 4.5 and 8.0 $\mu$m, for TrES-1, and 24 $\mu$m, for HD209458b. We find that standard solar metallicity models fit the observations for HD209458b. For TrES-1, which has an T_eff ~300 K cooler, we find that models with a metallicity 3-5 times enhanced over solar abundances can match the 1$\sigma$ error bar at 4.5 $\mu$m and 2$\sigma$ at 8.0$\mu$m. Models with solar abundances that included energy deposition into the stratosphere give fluxes that fall within the 2$\sigma$ error bars in both bands. The best-fit models for both planets assume that reradiation of absorbed stellar flux occurs over the entire planet. For all models of both planets we predict planet/star flux ratios in other Spitzer bandpasses.
  • While the precise mechanism responsible for the L to T dwarf transition remains unclear, it is clearly caused by changing cloud characteristics. Here we briefly review data relevant to understanding the nature of the transition and argue that changing atmospheric dynamics produce the transition by opening holes through the global iron and silicate cloud decks. Other possibilities, such as a sudden vertical collapse in these cloud decks are also considered. Any acceptable model of the L to T transition must ultimately connect changing cloud properties to the underlying atmospheric dynamics.
  • ESPI has been proposed for direct imaging and spectral analysis of giant planets orbiting solar-type stars. ESPI extends the concept suggested by Nisenson and Papaliolios (2001) for a square aperture apodized telescope that has sufficient dynamic range to directly detect exo-planets. With a 1.5 M square mirror, ESPI can deliver high dynamic range imagery as close as 0.3 arcseconds to bright sources, permitting a sensitive search for exoplanets around nearby stars and a study of their characteristics in reflected light.
  • A sophisticated approach to condensate opacity is required to properly model the atmospheres of L and T dwarfs. Here we review different models for the treatment of condensates in brown dwarf atmospheres. We conclude that models which include both particle sedimentation and upwards transport of condensate (both gas and particles) provide the best fit for the L dwarf colors. While a globally uniform cloud model fits the L dwarf data, it turns to the blue in J-K too slowly to fit the T dwarfs. Models which include local clearings in the global cloud deck, similar to Jupiter's prominent five-micron hot spots, better reproduce the available photometric data and also account for the observed resurgence of FeH absorption in early type T dwarfs.
  • Carbon monoxide and ammonia have been detected in the spectrum of Gl 229B at abundances that differ substantially from those obtained from chemical equilibrium. Vertical mixing in the atmosphere is a mechanism that can drive slowly reacting species out of chemical equilibrium. We explore the effects of vertical mixing as a function of mixing efficiency and effective temperature on the chemical abundances in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and on their spectra. The models compare favorably with the observational evidence and indicate that vertical mixing plays an important role in brown dwarf atmospheres.
  • We present new, high resolution, infrared spectra of the T dwarf Gliese 229B in the J, H, and K bandpasses. We analyze each of these as well as previously published spectra to determine its metallicity and the abundances of NH3 and CO in terms of the surface gravity of Gl 229B, which remains poorly constrained. The metallicity increases with increasing gravity and is below the solar value unless Gl 229B is a high-gravity brown dwarf with log g(cgs) ~ 5.5. The NH3 abundance is determined from both the H and the K band spectra which probe two different levels in the atmosphere. We find that the abundance from the K band data is well below that expected from chemical equilibrium, which we interpret as strong evidence for dynamical transport of NH3 in the atmosphere. This is consistent with the previous detection of CO and provides additional constraints on the dynamics of the atmosphere of this T dwarf.
  • The recent discovery that the close-in extrasolar giant planet, HD209458b, transits its star has provided a first-of-its-kind measurement of the planet's radius and mass. In addition, there is a provocative detection of the light reflected off of the giant planet, $\tau$ Boo b. Including the effects of stellar irradiation, we estimate the general behavior of radius/age trajectories for such planets and interpret the large measured radii of HD209458b and $\tau$ Boo b in that context. We find that HD209458b must be a hydrogen-rich gas giant. Furthermore, the large radius of close-in gas giant is not due to the thermal expansion of its atmosphere, but to the high residual entropy that remains throughout its bulk by dint of its early proximity to a luminous primary. The large stellar flux does not inflate the planet, but retards its otherwise inexorable contraction from a more extended configuration at birth. This implies either that such a planet was formed near its current orbital distance or that it migrated in from larger distances ($\geq$0.5 A.U.), no later than a few times $10^7$ years of birth.
  • We identify the pressure--broadened red wings of the saturated potassium resonance lines at 7700 \AA as the source of anomalous absorption seen in the near-infrared spectra of Gliese 229B and, by extension, of methane dwarfs in general. This conclusion is supported by the recent work of Tsuji {\it et al.} 1999, though unlike them we find that dust need not be invoked to explain the spectra of methane dwarfs shortward of 1 micron. We find that a combination of enhanced alkali abundances due to rainout and a more realistic non-Lorentzian theory of resonant line shapes may be all that is needed to properly account for these spectra from 0.5 to 1.0 microns. The WFPC2 $I$ measurement of Gliese 229B is also consistent with this theory. Furthermore, a combination of the blue wings of this K I resonance doublet, the red wings of the Na D lines at 5890 \AA, and, perhaps, the Li I line at 6708 \AA can explain in a natural way the observed WFPC2 $R$ band flux of Gliese 229B. Hence, we conclude that the neutral alkali metals play a central role in the near-infrared and optical spectra of methane dwarfs and that their lines have the potential to provide crucial diagnostics of brown dwarfs. We speculate on the systematics of the near-infrared and optical spectra of methane dwarfs, for a given mass and composition, that stems from the progressive burial with decreasing \teff of the alkali metal atoms to larger pressures and depths.
  • We present evolutionary sequences for Jupiter and Saturn, based on new nongray model atmospheres, which take into account the evolution of the solar luminosity and partitioning of dense components to deeper layers. The results are used to set limits on the extent to which possible interior phase separation of hydrogen and helium may have progressed in the two planets. When combined with static models constrained by the gravity field, our evolutionary calculations constrain the helium mass fraction in Jupiter to be between 0.20 and 0.27, relative to total hydrogen and helium. This is in agreement with the Galileo determination. The helium mass fraction in Saturn's atmosphere lies between 0.11 and 0.25, higher than the Voyager determination. Based on the discrepancy between the Galileo and Voyager results for Jupiter, and our models, we predict that Cassini measurements will yield a higher atmospheric helium mass fraction for Saturn relative to the Voyager value.
  • Electron-degenerate, pressure-ionized hydrogen (usually referred to as metallic hydrogen) is the principal constituent of brown dwarfs, the long-sought objects which lie in the mass range between the lowest-mass stars (about eighty times the mass of Jupiter) and the giant planets. The thermodynamics and transport properties of metallic hydrogen are important for understanding the properties of these objects, which, unlike stars, continually and slowly cool from initial nondegenerate (gaseous) states. Within the last year, a brown dwarf (Gliese 229 B) has been detected and its spectrum observed and analyzed, and several examples of extrasolar giant planets have been discovered. The brown dwarf appears to have a mass of about forty to fifty Jupiter masses and is now too cool to be fusing hydrogen or deuterium, although we predict that it will have consumed all of its primordial deuterium. This paper reviews the current understanding of the interrelationship between its interior properties and its observed spectrum, and also discusses the current status of research on the structure of giant planets, both in our solar system and elsewhere.
  • Theoretical spectra and evolutionary models that span the giant planet--brown dwarf continuum have been computed based on the recent discovery of the brown dwarf, Gliese 229 B. A flux enhancement in the 4--5 micron window is a universal feature from Jovian planets to brown dwarfs. We confirm the existence of methane and water in Gl 229 B's spectrum and find its mass to be 30 to 55 Jovian masses. Although these calculations focus on Gliese 229 B, they are also meant to guide future searches for extra-solar giant planets and brown dwarfs.