• Friedmans cosmological equations for the scale factor are analyzed for the Universe containing dark energy. The parameter of the equation of state of the dark energy is treated as an arbitrary constant whose value lies within the interval $w \in [-1.5, -0.5]$, the limits of which are set by current observations. A unified analytic solution is obtained for the scale factor as a function of physical and conformal time. We obtain approximated solutions for scale factor to an accuracy of better then 1%. This accuracy is better then measurement errors of global density parameters and therefore is suitable for the approximated models of our Universe. An analytic solution is obtained for the scale factor in $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model both in physical and conformal time, for the description of the evolution of the Universe from the epoch of matter domination up to the infinite future.
  • The most precise realization of inertial reference frame in astronomy is the catalogue of 212 defining extragalactic radiosources with coordinates obtained during VLBI observation runs in 1979-1995. IAU decided on the development of the second realization of the ICRF2 catalogue. The criteria of best sources selection (in terms of coordinates stability) must be defined as the first aim. The selected sources have to keep stable the coordinate axes of inertial astronomical frame. Here we propose new criteria of source selection for the new ICRF catalogue. The first one we call as "cosmological" and the second one as "kinematical". The physical basis of these criteria is based on the assumption that apparent motion of quasars (at angular scale of the order of hundred microarcseconds) is connected with real motion inside quasars. Therefore apparent angular motion corresponds to real physical motion of a "hot spot" inside a radio source. It is shown that interval of redshift $0.8 \div 3.0$ is the most favorable in terms that physical shift inside such sources corresponds to minimal apparent angular shift of a "hot spot". Among "cosmologically" selected sources we propose to select motionless sources and sources with linear motion which are predictable and stable over long time interval. To select sources which satisfies such conditions we analyzed known redshifts of sources and time series obtained by our code and by different centers of analysis of VLBI data. As a result of these analyses we select 137 sources as a basis for the ICRF2 catalogue.
  • We study effects of possible tachyonic perturbations of dark energy on the CMB temperature anisotropy. Motivated by some models of phantom energy, we consider both Lorentz-invariant and Lorentz-violating dispersion relations for tachyonic perturbations. We show that in the Lorentz-violating case, the shape of the CMB anisotropy spectrum generated by the tachyonic perturbations is very different from that due to adiabatic scalar perturbations and, if sizeable, it would be straightforwardly distinguished from the latter. The tachyonic contribution improves slightly the agreement between the theory and data; however, this improvement is not statistically significant, so our analysis results in limits on the time scale of the tachyonic instability. In the Lorentz-invariant case, tachyonic contribution is a rapidly decaying function of the multipole number $l$, so that the entire observed dipole can be generated without conflicting the data at higher multipoles. On the conservative side, our comparison with the data places limit on the absolute value of the (imaginary) tachyon mass in the Lorentz-invariant case.
  • Cosmic strings were postulated by Kibble in 1976 and, from a theoretical point of view, their existence finds support in modern superstring theories, both in compactification models and in theories with extended additional dimensions. Their eventual discovery would lead to significant advances in both cosmology and fundamental physics. One of the most effective ways to detect cosmic strings is through their lensing signatures which appear to be significantly different from those introduced by standard lenses (id est, compact clumps of matter). In 2003, the discovery of the peculiar object CSL-1 (Sazhin et al.2003) raised the interest of the physics community since its morphology and spectral features strongly argued in favour of it being the first case of gravitational lensing by a cosmic string. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the expected observational effects of a cosmic string and show, by means of simulations, the lensing signatures produced on background galaxies. While high angular resolution images obtained with HST, revealed that CSL-1 is a pair of interacting ellipticals at redshift 0.46, it represents a useful lesson to plan future surveys.
  • We have observed the gravitational lens system Q2237+0305 from the Maidanak Observatory over the period from August 2002 to November 2003. Here we report the results of our observations. We implemented a two-stage technique that has been developed specifically for the purpose of gravitational lens image reconstruction. The technique is based on the Tikhonov regularization approach and allows one to obtain astrometric and photometric characteristics of the gravitational lens system. Light curves with 78 data points for the four quasar components are obtained. Slow brightness variations over the observational period are found in all components. Images A, C, D have a tendency to decrease in brightness. Image B does not vary more than 0.05mag. The observations did not reveal evidence for large variations in brightness of the components due to microlensing effects. To provide an overall picture of the photometry behaviour, our data are combined with the Maidanak observations published for 1995 -- 2000.
  • SPOrt is an ASI-funded experiment specifically designed to measure the sky polarization at 22, 32 and 90 GHz, which was selected in 1997 by ESA to be flown on the International Space Station. Starting in 2006 and for at least 18 months, it will be taking direct and simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q and U at 660 sky pixels, with FWHM=7 degrees. Due to development efforts over the past few years, the design specifications have been significantly improved with respect to the first proposal. Here we present an up-to-date description of the instrument, which now warrants a pixel sensitivity of 1.7 microK for the polarization of the cosmic background radiation, assuming two years of observations. We discuss SPOrt scientific goals in the light of WMAP results, in particular in connection with the emerging double-reionization cosmological scenario.
  • BaR-SPOrt (Balloon-borne Radiometers for Sky Polarisation Observations) is an experiment to measure the linearly polarized emission of sky patches at 32 and 90 GHz with sub-degree angular resolution. It is equipped with high sensitivity correlation polarimeters for simultaneous detection of both the U and Q stokes parameters of the incident radiation. On-axis telescope is used to observe angular scales where the expected polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBP) peaks. This project shares most of the know-how and sophisticated technology developed for the SPOrt experiment onboard the International Space Station. The payload is designed to flight onboard long duration stratospheric balloons both in the Northern and Southern hemispheres where low foreground emission sky patches are accessible. Due to the weakness of the expected CMBP signal (in the range of microK), much care has been spent to optimize the instrument design with respect to the systematics generation, observing time efficiency and long term stability. In this contribution we present the instrument design, and first tests on some components of the 32 GHz radiometer.
  • SPOrt (Sky Polarization Observatory) is a space experiment to be flown on the International Space Station during Early Utilization Phase aimed at measuring the microwave polarized emission with FWHM = 7deg, in the frequency range 22-90 GHz. The Galactic polarized emission can be observed at the lower frequencies and the polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at 90 GHz, where contaminants are expected to be less important. The extremely low level of the CMB Polarization signal (< 1 uK) calls for intrinsically stable radiometers. The SPOrt instrument is expressly devoted to CMB polarization measurements and the whole design has been optimized for minimizing instrumental polarization effects. In this contribution we present the receiver architecture based on correlation techniques, the analysis showing its intrinsic stability and the custom hardware development carried out to detect such a low signal.
  • The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)is a powerful observational tool at hand for modern cosmology. It allows to break the degeneracy of fundamental cosmological parameters one cannot obtain using only anisotropy data and provides new insight into conditions existing in the very early Universe. Many experiments are now in progress whose aim is detecting anisotropy and polarization of the CMB. Measurements of the CMB polarization are however hampered by the presence of polarized foregrounds, above all the synchrotron emission of our Galaxy, whose importance increases as frequency decreases and dominates the polarized diffuse radiation at frequencies below $\simeq 50$ GHz. In the past the separation of CMB and synchrotron was made combining observations of the same area of sky made at different frequencies. In this paper we show that the statistical properties of the polarized components of the synchrotron and dust foregrounds are different from the statistical properties of the polarized component of the CMB, therefore one can build a statistical estimator which allows to extract the polarized component of the CMB from single frequency data also when the polarized CMB signal is just a fraction of the total polarized signal. This estimator improves the signal/noise ratio for the polarized component of the CMB and reduces from about 50 GHz to about 20 GHz the frequency above which the polarized component of the CMB can be extracted from single frequency maps of the diffuse radiation.
  • We discuss the amplification dispersion in the observed luminosity of standard candles, like supernovae (SNe) of type Ia, induced by gravitational lensing in a Universe with dark energy (quintessence). We derive the main features of the magnification probability distribution function (pdf) of SNe in the framework of on average Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) models for both lensing by large-scale structures and compact objects. The magnification pdf is strongly dependent on the equation of state, $w_Q$, of the quintessence. The dispersion increases with the redshift of the source and is maximum for dark energy with very large negative pressure; the effects of gravitational lensing on the magnification pdf, i.e. the mode biased towards de-amplified values and the long tail towards large magnifications, are reduced for both microscopic DM and quintessence with an intermediate $w_Q$. Different equations of state of the dark energy can deeply change the dispersion in amplification for the projected observed samples of SNe Ia by future space-born missions. The "noise" in the Hubble diagram due to gravitational lensing strongly affects the determination of the cosmological parameters from SNe data. The errors on the pressureless matter density parameter, $\Omega_M$, and on $w_Q$ are maximum for quintessence with not very negative pressure. The effect of the gravitational lensing is of the same order of the other systematics affecting observations of SNe Ia. Due to the lensing by large-scale structures, in a flat Universe with $\Omega_M =0.4$, at $z=1$ a cosmological constant ($w_Q=-1$) can be interpreted as dark energy with $w_Q <-0.84$ (at 2-$\sigma$ confidence limit).
  • Parallax measurements allow distances to celestial objects to be determined. Coupled with measurement of their position on the celestial sphere, it gives a full three-dimensional picture of the location of the objects relative to the observer. The distortion of the parallax value of a remote source affected by a weak microlensing is considered. This means that the weak microlensing leads to distortion of the distance scale. It is shown that the distortions to appear may change strongly the parallax values in case they amount to several microseconds of arc. In particular, at this accuracy many measured values of the parallaxes must be negative.
  • A lower limit for a neutral black hole size is obtained in the frames of the string gravity model with the second order curvature correction. It is shown that this effect remains when the third order curvature correction is also taken into account and argued that such restriction does exist in all perturbative orders of curvature expansions.
  • The Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt) is presented as a project aimed to measure the diffuse sky polarized emission, from the International Space Station, in the frequency range 20-90 GHz with 7 degrees of HPBW. The SPOrt experimental configuration is described with emphasis on the aspects that make SPOrt the first European scientific payload operating at microwave wavelengths.
  • We present the cosmological and astrophysical objectives of the SPOrt mission, which is scheduled for flying on the International Space Station (ISS) in the year 2002 with the purpose of measuring the diffuse sky polarized radiation in the microwave region. We discuss the problem of disentangling the cosmic background polarized signal from the Galactic foregrounds.
  • The fluctuation of the angular positions of reference extragalactic radio and optical sources under the influence of the irregular gravitational field of visible Galactic stars is considered. It is shown that these angular fluctuations range from a few up to hundreds of microarcseconds. This leads to a small rotation of the celestial reference frame. The nondiagonal coefficients of the rotation matrix are of the order of a microarcsecond. The temporal variation of these coefficients due to the proper motion of the foreground stars is of the order of one microsecond per 20 years. Therefore, the celestial reference frame can be considered inertial and homogeneous only to microarcsecond accuracy. Astrometric catalogues with microarcsecond accuracy will be unstable, and must be reestablished every 20 years.