• This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 micron range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H2O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03+/-0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH3OH and NH3 in the ices, present at the ~2% and ~5% levels, respectively, relative to H2O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J-K) color excess is found to follow a much shallower slope relative to lines of sight that probe diffuse clouds, supporting the previous results by Chiar et al. (2007).
  • We use deep, five band (100-500um) data from the Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) to fully constrain the obscured star formation rate, SFR_FIR, of galaxies in the Bullet cluster (z=0.296), and a smaller background system (z=0.35) in the same field. Herschel detects 23 Bullet cluster members with a total SFR_FIR = 144 +/- 14 M_sun yr^-1. On average, the background system contains brighter far-infrared (FIR) galaxies, with ~50% higher SFR_FIR (21 galaxies; 207 +/- 9 M_sun yr^-1). SFRs extrapolated from 24um flux via recent templates (SFR_24) agree well with SFR_FIR for ~60% of the cluster galaxies. In the remaining ~40%, SFR_24 underestimates SFR_FIR due to a significant excess in observed S_100/S_24 (rest frame S_75/S_18) compared to templates of the same FIR luminosity.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • We present Keck images of the dust disk around Beta Pictoris at 17.9 microns that reveal new structure in its morphology. Within 1" (19 AU) of the star, the long axis of the dust emission is rotated by more than 10 degrees with respect to that of the overall disk. This angular offset is more pronounced than the warp detected at 3.5" by HST, and in the opposite direction. By contrast, the long axis of the emission contours at ~ 1.5" from the star is aligned with the HST warp. Emission peaks between 1.5" and 4" from the star hint at the presence of rings similar to those observed in the outer disk at ~ 25" with HST/STIS. A deconvolved image strongly suggests that the newly detected features arise from a system of four non-coplanar rings. Bayesian estimates based on the primary image lead to ring radii of 14+/-1 AU, 28+/-3 AU, 52+/-2 AU and 82+/-2 AU, with orbital inclinations that alternate in orientation relative to the overall disk and decrease in magnitude with increasing radius. We believe these new results make a strong case for the existence of a nascent planetary system around Beta Pic.
  • Mid-infrared observations of the central source of NGC 1068 have been obtained with a spatial resolution in the deconvolved image of 0.1" (~ 7pc). The central source is extended by ~1" in the north-south direction but appears unresolved in the east-west direction over most of its length. About two-thirds of its flux can be ascribed to a core structure which is itself elongated north-south and does not show a distinct unresolved compact source. The source is strongly asymmetric, extending significantly further to the north than to the south. The morphology of the mid-infrared emission appears similar to that of the radio jet, and has features which correlate with the images in [O III]. Its 12.5-24.5 micron color temperature ranges from 215 to 260 K and does not decrease smoothly with distance from the core. Silicate absorption is strongest in the core and to the south and is small in the north. The core, apparently containing two-thirds of the bolometric luminosity of the inner 4" diameter area, may be explained by a thick, dusty torus near the central AGN viewed at an angle of ~65 deg to its plane. There are, however, detailed difficulties with existing models, especially the narrow east-west width of the thin extended mid-infrared "tongue" to the north of the core. We interpret the tongue as re-processed visual and ultraviolet radiation that is strongly beamed and that originates in the AGN.
  • Images of Arp 220 from 3.45 to 24.5 $\mu$m with 0.5'' resolution are presented which clearly separate the nucleus into at least two components. The western component is about three times more luminous than the eastern component, but the silicate absorption in the fainter, eastern component is roughly 50% greater than the absorption in the western component. Each component is marginally resolved. The two components seen at 24.5 $\mu$m are identified with the two radio components. The western source most likely coincides with the high extinction disk previously suggested to exist in Arp 220, while the eastern nucleus is identified with a faint highly reddened source seen in HST 2.2 $\mu$m NICMOS images. The two nuclei together account for essentially all of the measured 24.5 $\mu$m flux density. Two models are presented, both of which fit the observations. In one, the majority of the total luminosity is produced in an extended star formation region and in the other most of the luminosity is produced in the compact but extincted regions associated with the two nuclei seen at 24.5 $\mu$m. In both pictures, substantial luminosity at 100 $\mu$m emerges from a component having a diameter of 2--3'' ($\sim$1kpc).
  • We report the discovery of a circumstellar disk around the young A0 star, HR 4796, in thermal infrared imaging carried out at the W.M. Keck Observatory. By fitting a model of the emission from a flat dusty disk to an image at lambda=20.8 microns, we derive a disk inclination, i = 72 +6/-9 deg from face on, with the long axis of emission at PA 28 +/-6 deg. The intensity of emission does not decrease with radius as expected for circumstellar disks but increases outward from the star, peaking near both ends of the elongated structure. We simulate this appearance by varying the inner radius in our model and find an inner hole in the disk with radius R_in = 55+/-15 AU. This value corresponds to the radial distance of our own Kuiper belt and may suggest a source of dust in the collision of cometesimals. By contrast with the appearance at 20.8 microns, excess emission at lambda = 12.5 microns is faint and concentrated at the stellar position. Similar emission is also detected at 20.8 microns in residual subtraction of the best-fit model from the image. The intensity and ratio of flux densities at the two wavelengths could be accounted for by a tenuous dust component that is confined within a few AU of the star with mean temperature of a few hundred degrees K, similar to that of zodiacal dust in our own solar system. The morphology of dust emission from HR 4796 (age 10 Myr) suggests that its disk is in a transitional planet-forming stage, between that of massive gaseous proto-stellar disks and more tenuous debris disks such as the one detected around Vega.