• The resemblance between the methods used in quantum-many body physics and in machine learning has drawn considerable attention. In particular, tensor networks (TNs) and deep learning architectures bear striking similarities to the extent that TNs can be used for machine learning. Previous results used one-dimensional TNs in image recognition, showing limited scalability and flexibilities. In this work, we train two-dimensional hierarchical TNs to solve image recognition problems, using a training algorithm derived from the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz. This approach introduces mathematical connections among quantum many-body physics, quantum information theory, and machine learning. While keeping the TN unitary in the training phase, TN states are defined, which encode classes of images into quantum many-body states. We study the quantum features of the TN states, including quantum entanglement and fidelity. We find these quantities could be properties that characterize the image classes, as well as the machine learning tasks.
  • Thermodynamics and information have intricate interrelations. Often thermodynamics is considered to be the logical premise to justify that information is physical - through Landauer's principle -, thereby also linking information and thermodynamics. This approach towards information has been instrumental to understand thermodynamics of logical and physical processes, both in the classical and quantum domain. In the present work, we formulate thermodynamics as an exclusive consequence of information conservation. The framework can be applied to the most general situations, beyond the traditional assumptions in thermodynamics: we allow systems and thermal baths to be quantum, of arbitrary sizes and possessing inter-system correlations. Here, systems and baths are not treated differently, rather both are considered on an equal footing. This leads us to introduce a "temperature"-independent formulation of thermodynamics. We rely on the fact that, for a fixed amount of information, measured by the von Neumann entropy, any system can be transformed to a state with the same entropy that possesses minimal energy. This state, known as a completely passive state, acquires Boltzmann-Gibbs canonical form with an intrinsic temperature. We introduce the notions of bound and free energy and use them to quantify heat and work, respectively. Guided by the principle of information conservation, we develop universal notions of equilibrium, heat and work, Landauer's principle and universal fundamental laws of thermodynamics. We demonstrate that the maximum efficiency of a quantum engine with a finite bath is in general lower than that of an ideal Carnot engine. We introduce a resource theoretic framework for our intrinsic temperature based thermodynamics, within which we address the problem of work extraction and state transformations. Finally, the framework is extended to multiple conserved quantities.
  • (Please refer to arXiv:1810.08050, which has completely different aims but contains all the main contents of this paper) In this work, we propose to access the information of criticality and excitations of one-dimensional quantum systems by a matrix product state (MPS) defined in the (imaginary) time direction. This state, dubbed as time MPS (tMPS), is a boundary state of tensor network (TN) that represents the ground-state simulation after Trotter-Suzuki decomposition. We show that the tMPS exhibits the structure of the continuous MPS originally proposed for the field theories. The information of excitations, e.g., dynamic correlation length and energy gap, can be accurately calculated from the tMPS. The non-universal renormalization of velocity of the excitations is given by a ratio between the correlations of the ground state and the tMPS. When the system is at the quantum critical point, the tMPS is found to show the logarithmic scaling law, where the scaling coefficient gives the central charge that characterizes the criticality of the theory. Our work also implies that the spectra of the transfer matrices defined by the ground state and tMPS provide information of the low-lying masses of the theory in the continuous limit. This could help to understand the role of the finiteness of the bond dimension as an infra red regulator. Furthermore, we show from the perspective of methodology that, the tMPS emerges from a generalized TN ab-initio optimization principle scheme, which unifies the infinite density matrix renormalization group and the infinite time-evolving block decimation algorithms.
  • Searching for simple models that possess non-trivial controlling properties is one of the central tasks in the field of quantum technologies. In this work, we construct a quantum spin-$1/2$ chain of finite size, termed as controllable spin wire (CSW), in which we have $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ (Ising) interactions with a transverse field in the bulk, and $\hat{S}^{x} \hat{S}^{z}$ and $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ couplings with a canted field on the boundaries. The Hamiltonians on the boundaries, dubbed as tuning Hamiltonians (TH's), bear the same form as the effective Hamiltonians emerging in the so-called `quantum entanglement simulator' that is originally proposed for mimicking infinite models. We show that tuning the TH's (parametrized by $\alpha$) can trigger non-trivial controlling of the bulk properties, including the degeneracy of energy/entanglement spectra, and the response to the magnetic field $h_{bulk}$ in the bulk. A universal point dubbed as $\alpha^s$ emerges. For $\alpha > \alpha^s$, the ground-state diagram versus $h_{bulk}$ consists of three `phases', which are Ne\'eL and polarized phases, and an emergent pseudo-magnet phase, distinguished by entanglement and magnetization. For $\alpha < \alpha^s$, the phase diagram changes completely, with no step-like behaviors to distinguish phases. Due to its controlling properties and simplicity, the CSW could potentially serve in future the experiments for developing quantum devices.
  • Tensor network (TN), a young mathematical tool of high vitality and great potential, has been undergoing extremely rapid developments in the last two decades, gaining tremendous success in condensed matter physics, atomic physics, quantum information science, statistical physics, and so on. In this lecture notes, we focus on the contraction algorithms of TN as well as some of the applications to the simulations of quantum many-body systems. Starting from basic concepts and definitions, we first explain the relations between TN and physical problems, including the TN representations of classical partition functions, quantum many-body states (by matrix product state, tree TN, and projected entangled pair state), time evolution simulations, etc. These problems, which are challenging to solve, can be transformed to TN contraction problems. We present then several paradigm algorithms based on the ideas of the numerical renormalization group and/or boundary states, including density matrix renormalization group, time-evolving block decimation, coarse-graining/corner tensor renormalization group, and several distinguished variational algorithms. Finally, we revisit the TN approaches from the perspective of multi-linear algebra (also known as tensor algebra or tensor decompositions) and quantum simulation. Despite the apparent differences in the ideas and strategies of different TN algorithms, we aim at revealing the underlying relations and resemblances in order to present a systematic picture to understand the TN contraction approaches.
  • The Unruh effect is a quantum relativistic effect where the accelerated observer perceives the vacuum as a thermal state. Here we propose the experimental realization of the Unruh effect for interacting ultracold fermions in optical lattices by a sudden quench resulting in vacuum acceleration with varying interactions strengths in the real temperature background. We observe the inversion of statistics for the low lying excitations in the Wightman function as a result of competition between the spacetime and BCS Bogoliubov transformations. This paper opens up new perspectives for simulators of quantum gravity.
  • We study entanglement entropy (EE) as a signature of quantum chaos in ergodic and non-ergodic systems. In particular we look at the quantum kicked top and kicked rotor as multi-qubit systems, and investigate the single qubit EE which characterizes bipartite entanglement of this qubit with the rest of the system. We study the correspondence of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the classical kicked systems with the EE of their quantum counterparts. We find that EE is a signature of global chaos in ergodic systems, and local chaos in non-ergodic systems. In particular, we show that EE can be maximised even when systems are highly non-ergodic, when the corresponding classical system is locally chaotic. In contrast, we find evidence that the quantum analogue of Kolmogorov-Arnol'd-Noser (KAM) tori are tori of low entanglement entropy. We conjecture that entanglement should play an important role in any quantum KAM theory.
  • We investigate the properties of two interacting ultracold polar molecules described as distinguishable quantum rigid rotors, trapped in a one-dimensional harmonic potential. The molecules interact via a multichannel two-body contact potential, incorporating the short-range anisotropy of intermolecular interactions including dipole-dipole interaction. The impact of external electric and magnetic fields resulting in Stark and Zeeman shifts of molecular rovibrational states is also investigated. Energy spectra and eigenstates are calculated by means of the exact diagonalization. The importance and interplay of the molecular rotational structure, anisotropic interactions, spin-rotation coupling, electric and magnetic fields, and harmonic trapping potential are examined in detail, and compared to the system of two harmonically trapped distinguishable atoms. Presented model and results may provide microscopic parameters for molecular many-body Hamiltonians, and may be useful for the development of bottom-up molecule-by-molecule assembled molecular quantum simulators.
  • We show that the physical mechanism for the equilibration of closed quantum systems is dephasing, and identify the energy scales that determine the equilibration timescale of a given observable. For realistic physical systems (e.g those with local Hamiltonians), our arguments imply timescales that do not increase with the system size, in contrast to previously known upper bounds. In particular we show that, for such Hamiltonians, the matrix representation of local observables in the energy basis is banded, and that this property is crucial in order to derive equilibration times that are non-negligible in macroscopic systems. Finally, we give an intuitive interpretation to recent theorems on equilibration time-scale.
  • It is a fundamental, but still elusive question whether methods based on quantum mechanics, in particular on quantum entanglement, can be used for classical information processing and machine learning. Even partial answer to this question would bring important insights to both fields of both machine learning and quantum mechanics. In this work, we implement simple numerical experiments, related to pattern/images classification, in which we represent the classifiers by quantum matrix product states (MPS). Classical machine learning algorithm is then applied to these quantum states. We explicitly show how quantum features (i.e., single-site and bipartite entanglement) can emerge in such represented images; entanglement characterizes here the importance of data, and this information can be practically used to improve the learning procedures. Thanks to the low demands on the dimensions and number of the unitary matrices, necessary to construct the MPS, we expect such numerical experiments could open new paths in classical machine learning, and shed at same time lights on generic quantum simulations/computations.
  • We study the dynamics of an impurity embedded in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, i.e. the Bose polaron problem, with the open quantum systems techniques. In this framework, the impurity corresponds to a particle performing quantum Brownian motion, and the excitation modes of the Bose-Einstein condensate play the role of the environment. We solve the associated quantum Langevin equation to find the position and momentum variances of the impurity. When the impurity is untrapped, its long-time dynamics is super-diffusive. When the impurity is trapped, we find position squeezing. To consider a Bose-Einstein condensate in a trapping potential is crucial to study this system in experimental realistic conditions. We detail how, for the untrapped case, the diffusion coefficient, which is a measurable quantity, depends on the Bose-Einstein condensate trap frequency. Also, we show that, for the trapped case, the squeezing can be enhanced or inhibited by tuning the Bose-Einstein condensate trap frequency.
  • Double electron ionisation process occurs when an intense laser pulse interacts with atoms or molecules. Exact {\it ab initio} numerical simulation of such a situation is extremely computer resources demanding, thus often one is forced to apply reduced dimensionality models to get insight into the physics of the process. The performance of several algorithms for simulating double electron ionization by strong femtosecond laser pulses are studied. The obtained ionization yields and the momentum distributions of the released electrons are compared, and the effects of the model dimensionality on the ionization dynamics discussed.
  • While the interest in multipartite nonlocality has grown in recent years, its existence in large quantum systems is difficult to confirm experimentally. This is mostly due to the inadequacy of standard multipartite Bell inequalities to many-body systems: such inequalities usually rely on expectation values involving many parties and require an individual addressing of each party. In a recent work [J. Tura et al. Science 344, 6189 (2014)] some of us proposed simpler Bell inequalities overcoming such difficulties, opening the way for the detection of Bell correlations with trusted collective measurements through Bell correlation witnesses [R. Schmied et al. Science 352, 441 (2016)], hence demonstrating the presence of Bell correlations with assumptions on the statistics. Here, we address the question of assessing the number of particles sharing genuinely nonlocal correlations in a multipartite system. This endeavour is a priori challenging, as known Bell inequalities for genuine nonlocality suffer from the above shortcomings, plus a number of measurement settings scaling exponentially with the system size. We first show that most of these constraints drop once the witnesses corresponding to these inequalities are expressed: in systems where multipartite expectation values can be evaluated, these witnesses can reveal genuine nonlocality for an arbitrary number of particles with just two collective measurements. We then introduce a general framework focused on two-body Bell-like inequalities. We show that they also provide information about the number of particles that are genuinely nonlocal. Then, we characterize all such inequalities for a finite system size. We provide witnesses of Bell correlation depth $k\leq6$ for any number of parties, within experimental reach. A violation for depth $6$ is achieved with existing data from an ensemble of 480 atoms.
  • Recently it has been demonstrated that an ensemble of trapped ions may serve as a quantum annealer for the number-partitioning problem [Nature Comm. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11524]. This hard computational problem may be addressed employing a tunable spin glass architecture. Following the proposal of the trapped ions annealer, we study here its robustness against thermal effects, that is, we investigate the role played by thermal phonons. For the efficient description of the system, we use a semiclassical approach, and benchmark it against the exact quantum evolution. The aim is to understand better and characterize how the quantum device approaches a solution of, an otherwise, difficult to solve NP-hard problem.
  • We study a one-dimensional system of strongly-correlated bosons interacting with a dynamical lattice. A minimal model describing the latter is provided by extending the standard Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian to include extra degrees of freedom on the bonds of the lattice. We show that this model is capable of reproducing phenomena similar to those present in usual fermion-phonon models. In particular, we discover a bosonic analog of the Peierls transition, where the translational symmetry of the underlying lattice is spontaneously broken. The latter provides a dynamical mechanism to obtain a topological insulator in the presence of interactions, analogous to the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model for electrons. We numerically characterize the phase diagram of the model, which includes different types of bond order waves and topological solitons. Finally, we study the possibility of implementing the model experimentally using atomic systems.
  • The temperature dependence of a mobile impurity in a dilute Bose gas, the Bose polaron, is investigated for wide a range of impurity-bath interactions. Using a diagrammatic resummation scheme designed to include scattering processes important at finite temperature $T$, we show that the phase transition of the environment to a Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical temperature $T_c$ leads to several non-trivial effects. The attractive polaron present at $T=0$ fragments into two quasiparticle states for finite temperature whenever $|a|\gtrsim a_B$, with $a$ and $a_B$ the impurity-boson and boson-boson scattering lengths. While the quasiparticle with higher energy disappears at $T_c$, the ground state quasiparticle remains well-defined across $T_c$. Its energy depends non-monotonically on temperature, featuring a minimum at $T_c$, after which it increases towards zero, and at $T\gg T_c$ the polaron eventually becomes overdamped due to strong scattering with thermally excited bosons.
  • We study chiral models in one spatial dimension, both static and periodically driven. We demonstrate that their topological properties may be read out through the long time limit of a bulk observable, the mean chiral displacement. The derivation of this result is done in terms of spectral projectors, allowing for a detailed understanding of the physics. We show that the proposed detection converges rapidly and it can be implemented in a wide class of chiral systems. Furthermore, it can measure arbitrary winding numbers and topological boundaries, it applies to all non-interacting systems, independently of their quantum statistics, and it requires no additional elements, such as external fields, nor filled bands.
  • We study the separability problem in mixtures of Dicke states i.e., the separability of the so-called Diagonal Symmetric (DS) states. First, we show that separability in the case of DS in $C^d\otimes C^d$ (symmetric qudits) can be reformulated as a quadratic conic optimization problem. This connection allows us to exchange concepts and ideas between quantum information and this field of mathematics. For instance, copositive matrices can be understood as indecomposable entanglement witnesses for DS states. As a consequence, we show that positivity of the partial transposition (PPT) is sufficient and necessary for separability of DS states for $d \leq 4$. Furthermore, for $d \geq 5$, we provide analytic examples of PPT-entangled states. Second, we develop new sufficient separability conditions beyond the PPT criterion for bipartite DS states. Finally, we focus on $N$-partite DS qubits, where PPT is known to be necessary and sufficient for separability. In this case, we present a family of almost DS states that are PPT with respect to each partition but nevertheless entangled.
  • The laws of thermodynamics, despite their wide range of applicability, are known to break down when systems are correlated with their environments. Here, we generalize thermodynamics to physical scenarios which allow presence of correlations, including those where strong correlations are present. We exploit the connection between information and physics, and introduce a consistent redefinition of heat dissipation by systematically accounting for the information flow from system to bath in terms of the conditional entropy. As a consequence, the formula for the Helmholtz free energy is accordingly modified. Such a remedy not only fixes the apparent violations of Landauer's erasure principle and the second law due to anomalous heat flows, but also leads to a generally valid reformulation of the laws of thermodynamics. In this information-theoretic approach, correlations between system and environment store work potential. Thus, in this view, the apparent anomalous heat flows are the refrigeration processes driven by such potentials.
  • Due to the presence of strong correlations, theoretical or experimental investigations of quantum many-body systems belong to the most challenging tasks in modern physics. Stimulated by tensor networks, we propose a scheme of constructing the few-body models that can be easily accessed by theoretical or experimental means, to accurately capture the ground-state properties of infinite many-body systems in higher dimensions. The general idea is to embed a small bulk of the infinite model in an "entanglement bath" so that the many-body effects can be faithfully mimicked. The approach we propose is efficient, simple, flexible, sign-problem-free, and it directly accesses the thermodynamic limit. The numerical results of the spin models on honeycomb and simple cubic lattices show that the ground-state properties including quantum phase transitions and the critical behaviors are accurately captured by only $\mathcal{O}(10)$ physical and bath sites. Moreover, since the few-body Hamiltonian only contains local interactions among a handful of sites, our work provides new ways of studying the many-body phenomena in the infinite strongly-correlated systems by mimicking them in the few-body experiments using cold atoms/ions, or developing novel quantum devices by utilizing the many-body features.
  • Quantum entanglement and coherence are two fundamental features of nature, arising from the superposition principle of quantum mechanics. While considered as puzzling phenomena in the early days of quantum theory, it is only very recently that entanglement and coherence have been recognized as resources for the emerging quantum technologies, including quantum metrology, quantum communication, and quantum computing. In this work we study the limitations for the interconversion between coherence and entanglement. We prove a fundamental no-go theorem, stating that a general resource theory of superposition does not allow for entanglement activation. By constructing a CNOT gate as a free operation, we experimentally show that such activation is possible within the more constrained framework of quantum coherence. Our results provide new insights into the interplay between coherence and entanglement, representing a substantial step forward for solving longstanding open questions in quantum information science.
  • We study the dynamics of a quantum impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate as an open quantum system in the framework of the quantum Brownian motion model. We derive a generalized Langevin equation for the position of the impurity. The Langevin equation is an integrodifferential equation that contains a memory kernel and is driven by a colored noise. These result from considering the environment as given by the degrees of freedom of the quantum gas, and thus depend on its parameters, e.g. interaction strength between the bosons, temperature, etc. We study the role of the memory on the dynamics of the impurity. When the impurity is untrapped, we find that it exhibits a super-diffusive behavior at long times. We find that back-flow in energy between the environment and the impurity occurs during evolution. When the particle is trapped, we calculate the variance of the position and momentum to determine how they compare with the Heisenberg limit. One important result of this paper is that we find position squeezing for the trapped impurity at long times. We determine the regime of validity of our model and the parameters in which these effects can be observed in realistic experiments.
  • We study the superfluid response, the energetic and structural properties of a one-dimensional ultracold Bose gas in an optical lattice of arbitrary strength. We use the Bose-Fermi mapping in the limit of infinitely large repulsive interaction and the diffusion Monte Carlo method in the case of finite interaction. For slightly incommensurate fillings we find a superfluid behavior which is discussed in terms of vacancies and interstitials. It is shown that both the excitation spectrum and static structure factor are different for the cases of microscopic and macroscopic fractions of defects. This system provides a extremely well-controlled model for studying defect-induced superfluidity.
  • Objectivity constitutes one of the main features of the macroscopic classical world. An important aspect of the quantum-to-classical transition issue is to explain how such a property arises from the microscopic quantum world. Recently, within the framework of open quantum systems, there has been proposed such a mechanism in terms of the, so-called, Spectrum Broadcast Structures. These are multipartite quantum states of the system of interest and a part of its environment, assumed to be under an observation. This approach requires a departure from the standard open quantum systems methods, as the environment cannot be completely neglected. In the present work we study the emergence of such a state-structures in one of the canonical models of the condensed matter theory: Spin-boson model, describing the dynamics of a two-level system coupled to an environment made up by a large number of harmonic oscillators. We pay much attention to the behavior of the model in the non-Markovian regime, in order to provide a testbed to analyze how the non-Markovian nature of the evolution affects the surfacing of a spectrum broadcast structure.
  • Characterizing criticality in quantum many-body systems of dimension $\ge 2$ is one of the most important challenges of the contemporary physics. In principle, there is no generally valid theoretical method that could solve this problem. In this work, we propose an efficient approach to identify the criticality of quantum systems in higher dimensions. Departing from the analysis of the numerical renormalization group flows, we build a general equivalence between the higher-dimensional ground state and a one-dimensional (1D) quantum state defined in the imaginary time direction in terms of the so-called time matrix product state (tMPS). We show that the criticality of the targeted model can be faithfully identified by the tMPS, using the mature scaling schemes of correlation length and entanglement entropy in 1D quantum theories. We benchmark our proposal with the results obtained for the Heisenberg anti-ferromagnet on honeycomb lattice. We demonstrate critical scaling relation of the tMPS for the gapless case, and a trivial scaling for the gapped case with spatial anisotropy. The critical scaling behaviors are insensitive to the system size, suggesting the criticality can be identified in small systems. Our tMPS scheme for critical scaling shows clearly that the spin-1/2 kagom\'e Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a gapless ground state. More generally, the present study indicates that the 1D conformal field theories in imaginary time provide a very useful tool to characterize the criticality of higher dimensional quantum systems.