• Hybrid sources that present FR I - like jet on the one side of the radio core and FR II - like on the other are rare class of objects that may posses key to understanding the origin of FR division. We presents information connected with the new high resolution VLBA follow-up observations of 5 recently discovered hybrid sources. We believe that sources which exhibit two different morphologies at the opposite side of the radio core are FR II type objects evolving in non-uniform high-density environment.
  • Adding VLBI capability to the SKA arrays will greatly broaden the science of the SKA, and is feasible within the current specifications. SKA-VLBI can be initially implemented by providing phased-array outputs for SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR and using these extremely sensitive stations with other radio telescopes, and in SKA2 by realising a distributed configuration providing baselines up to thousands of km, merging it with existing VLBI networks. The motivation for and the possible realization of SKA-VLBI is described in this paper.
  • Broad absorption line (BAL) quasars have been studied for over thirty years. Yet it is still unclear why and when we observe broad absorption lines in quasars. Is this phenomenon caused by geometry or is it connected with the evolution process? Variability of the BAL quasars, if present, can give us information about their orientation, namely it can indicate whether they are oriented more pole-on. Using the Torun 32-metre dish equipped with the One Centimetre Receiver Array (OCRA) we have started a monitoring campaign of a sample of compact radio-loud BAL quasars. This 30 GHz variability monitoring program supplements the high-resolution interferometric observations of these objects we have carried out with the EVN and VLBA.
  • We discovered an X-ray cluster in a recent pointed Chandra observation of the radio-loud compact-steep-spectrum source 1321+045 at the redshift of 0.263. 1321+045 is part of larger survey which aims to study the X-rays properties of weak compact radio sources. Compact radio sources are young objects at the beginning of their evolution and if embedded in an X-ray cluster offer unique opportunities to study the cluster heating process.
  • The FRI/FRII dichotomy is a much debated issue in the astrophysics of extragalactic radio sources. Study of the properties of HYbrid MOrphology Radio Sources (HYMORS) may bring crucial information and lead to a step forward in understanding the origin of FRI/FRII dichotomy. HYMORS are a rare class of double-lobed radio sources where each of the two lobes clearly exhibits a different FR morphology. This article describes follow-up high resolution VLBA observations of the five discovered by us HYMORS. The main aim of the observations was to answer the questions of whether the unusual radio morphology is connected to the orientation of objects towards the observer. We obtained the high resolution radio maps of five hybrid radio morphology objects with the VLBA at C-band and L-band. Two of them revealed milliarcsecond core-jet structures, the next two objects showed hints of parsec-scale jets, and the last one remained point-like at both frequencies. We compared properties of observed milliarcsecond structures of hybrid sources with the larger scale ones previously detected with the VLA. We find that on both scales the fluxes of their central components are similar, which may indicate the lack of additional emission in the proximity of the nucleus. This suggests that jets present on the 1-10 kpc scale in those objects are FRII-like. When possible, the detected core-jet structures were used for estimating the core's spatial orientation. The result is that neither the FRI-like nor the FRII-like side is preferred, which may suggest that no specific spatial orientation of HYMORS is required to explain their radio morphology. Their estimated viewing angles indicate they are unbeamed objects. The 178 MHz luminosity of observed HYMORS exceed the traditional FRI/FRII break luminosity, indicating they have radio powers similar to FRIIs.
  • Broad absorption lines (BALs), seen in a small fraction of both the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasar populations, are probably caused by the outflow of gas with high velocities and are part of the accretion process. The presence of BALs is the geometrical effect and/or it is connected with the quasar evolution. Using the final release of FIRST survey combined with a A Catalog of BAL QSOs (SDSS/DR3), we have constructed a new sample of compact radio-loud BAL QSOs, which makes the majority of radio-loud BAL QSOs. The main goal of this project is to study the origin of BALs by analysis the BAL QSOs radio morphology, their orientation and jets evolution, using EVN at 1.6 GHz and VLBA at 5 and 8.4 GHz. We will discuss also the first multi-frequency radio observations of very compact BAL quasar 1045+352 made using the VLBA, EVN, MERLIN and CHANDRA. We speculate that the most probable interpretation of the observed radio structure of 1045+352 is the ongoing process of the jet precession due to internal instabilities within the flow.
  • We report the high resolution radio observations and their analysis of a radio-loud compact steep spectrum (CSS) quasar FIRST J164311.3+315618, one of the members of a binary system. The second component of the system is a radio-quiet AGN. The projected separation of this pair is 2.3 arcsec (15 kpc) and it is one of the known smallest separation binary quasars. The multi-band images of this binary system made with the Hubble Space Telescope showed that the host galaxy of the radio-loud quasar is highly disturbed. The radio observations presented here were made with the multi-element radio linked interferometer network (MERLIN) at 1.66 GHz and 5 GHz. We show that the radio morphology of FIRST J164311.3+315618 is complex on both frequencies and exhibits four components, which indicate on the intermittent activity with a possible rapid change of the jet direction and/or restart of the jet due to the interaction with the companion. The radio components that are no longer powered by the jet can quickly fade away. We suggest that this makes the potential distortions of the radio structure to be short-lived phenomena. On the other hand, our numerical simulations show that the influence of the companion can lead to the prolonged current and future activity. FIRST J164311.3+315618 is an unusual and statistically very rare low redshift binary quasar in which probably the first close encounter is just taking place.
  • We present new more sensitive high-resolution radio observations of a compact broad absorption line (BAL) quasar, 1045+352, made with the EVN+MERLIN at 5 GHz. They allowed us to trace the connection between the arcsecond structure and the radio core of the quasar. The radio morphology of 1045+352 is dominated by a knotty jet showing several bends. We discuss possible scenarios that could explain such a complex morphology: galaxy merger, accretion disk instability, precession of the jet and jet-cloud interactions. It is possible that we are witnessing an ongoing jet precession in this source due to internal instabilities within the jet flow, however, a dense environment detected in the submillimeter band and an outflowing material suggested by the X-ray absorption could strongly interact with the jet. It is difficult to establish the orientation between the jet axis and the observer in 1045+352 because of the complex structure. Nevertheless taking into account the most recent inner radio structure we conclude that the radio jet is oriented close to the line of sight which can mean that the opening angle of the accretion disk wind can be large in this source. We also suggest that there is no direct correlation between the jet-observer orientation and the possibility of observing BALs.
  • Based on the FIRST and SDSS catalogues a flux density limited sample of weak Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources with radio luminosity below 10^26 [W/Hz] at 1.4 GHz has been constructed. Our previous multifrequency observations of CSS sources have shown that low luminosity small-scale objects can be strong candidates for compact faders. This finding supports the idea that some small-size radio sources are short-lived phenomena because of a lack of significant fuelling. They never 'grow up' to become FRI or FRII objects. This new sample marks the start of a systematical study of the radio properties and morphologies of the population of low luminosity compact (LLC) objects. An investigation of this new sample should also lead to a better understanding of compact faders. In this paper, the results of the first stage of the new project - the L-band MERLIN observations of 44 low luminosity CSS sources are presented.
  • The first multifrequency radio observations of the very compact BAL quasar, 1045+352, were made using MERLIN and the VLBA in a snapshot mode. However, its unusual radio structure was still very difficult to interpret, indicating a scenario of intermittent activity or a jet precession. Here, we present some of a new full-track radio observations of 1045+352 made with the EVN+MERLIN at 5 GHz. The new more sensitive high-resolution observations made possible to trace the connection between the arcsecond structure and the radio core, and showed the presence of strong interactions between the jet and the medium of the host galaxy.
  • Evidence has been mounting recently that activity in some radio-loud AGNs (RLAGNs) can cease shortly after ignition and that perhaps even a majority of very compact sources may be short-lived phenomena because of a lack of stable fuelling from the black hole. Thus, they can fade out before having evolved to large, extended objects. Re-ignition of the activity in such objects is not ruled out. With the aim of finding more examples of these objects and to investigate if they could be RLAGNs switched off at very early stages of their evolution, multifrequency VLBA observations of six sources with angular sizes significantly less than an arcsecond, yet having steep spectra, have been made. Observations were initially made at 1.65 GHz using the VLBA with the inclusion of Effelsberg telescope. The sources were then re-observed with the VLBA at 5, 8.4 and 15.4 GHz. All the observations were carried out in a snapshot mode with phase referencing. One of the sources studied, 0809+404, is dominated by a compact component but also has diffuse, arcsecond-scale emission visible in VLA images. The VLBI observations of the "core" structure have revealed that this is also diffuse and fading away at higher frequencies. Thus, the inner component of 0809+404 could be a compact fading object. The remaining five sources presented here show either core-jet or edge-brightened double-lobed structures indicating that they are in an active phase. The above result is an indication that the activity of the host galaxy of 0809+404 may be intermittent. Previous observations obtained from the literature and those presented here indicate that activity had ceased once in the past, then restarted, and has recently switched off again.
  • A new sample of candidate Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources that are much weaker than the CSS source prototypes has been selected from the VLA FIRST catalogue. MERLIN `snapshot' observations of the sources at 5 GHz indicate that six of them have an FR II-like morphology, but are not edge-brightened as is normal for Medium-sized Symmetric Objects (MSOs) and FR IIs. Further observations of these six sources with the VLA at 4.9 GHz and MERLIN at 1.7 GHz, as well as subsequent full-track observations with MERLIN at 5 GHz of what appeared to be the two sources of greatest interest are presented. The results are discussed with reference to the established evolutionary model of CSS sources being young but in which not all of them evolve to become old objects with extended radio structures. A lack of stable fuelling in some of them may result in an early transition to a so-called coasting phase so that they fade away instead of growing to become large-scale objects. It is possible that one of the six sources (1542+323) could be labelled as a prematurely `dying' MSO or a `fader'.