• We study the interaction between a fleet of electric, self-driving vehicles servicing on-demand transportation requests (referred to as Autonomous Mobility-on-Demand, or AMoD, system) and the electric power network. We propose a model that captures the coupling between the two systems stemming from the vehicles' charging requirements and captures time-varying customer demand and power generation costs, road congestion, battery depreciation, and power transmission and distribution constraints. We then leverage the model to jointly optimize the operation of both systems. We devise an algorithmic procedure to losslessly reduce the problem size by bundling customer requests, allowing it to be efficiently solved by off-the-shelf linear programming solvers. Next, we show that the socially optimal solution to the joint problem can be enforced as a general equilibrium, and we provide a dual decomposition algorithm that allows self-interested agents to compute the market clearing prices without sharing private information. We assess the performance of the mode by studying a hypothetical AMoD system in Dallas-Fort Worth and its impact on the Texas power network. Lack of coordination between the AMoD system and the power network can cause a 4.4% increase in the price of electricity in Dallas-Fort Worth; conversely, coordination between the AMoD system and the power network could reduce electricity expenditure compared to the case where no cars are present (despite the increased demand for electricity) and yield savings of up $147M/year. Finally, we provide a receding-horizon implementation and assess its performance with agent-based simulations. Collectively, the results of this paper provide a first-of-a-kind characterization of the interaction between electric-powered AMoD systems and the power network, and shed additional light on the economic and societal value of AMoD.
  • We study the system-level effects of the introduction of large populations of Electric Vehicles on the power and transportation networks. We assume that each EV owner solves a decision problem to pick a cost-minimizing charge and travel plan. This individual decision takes into account traffic congestion in the transportation network, affecting travel times, as well as as congestion in the power grid, resulting in spatial variations in electricity prices for battery charging. We show that this decision problem is equivalent to finding the shortest path on an "extended" transportation graph, with virtual arcs that represent charging options. Using this extended graph, we study the collective effects of a large number of EV owners individually solving this path planning problem. We propose a scheme in which independent power and transportation system operators can collaborate to manage each network towards a socially optimum operating point while keeping the operational data of each system private. We further study the optimal reserve capacity requirements for pricing in the absence of such collaboration. We showcase numerically that a lack of attention to interdependencies between the two infrastructures can have adverse operational effects.
  • Flexibility in electric power consumption can be leveraged by Demand Response (DR) programs. The goal of this paper is to systematically capture the inherent aggregate flexibility of a population of appliances. We do so by clustering individual loads based on their characteristics and service constraints. We highlight the challenges associated with learning the customer response to economic incentives while applying demand side management to heterogeneous appliances. We also develop a framework to quantify customer privacy in direct load scheduling programs.
  • To respond to volatility and congestion in the power grid, demand response (DR) mechanisms allow for shaping the load compared to a base load profile. When tapping on a large population of heterogeneous appliances as a DR resource, the challenge is in modeling the dimensions available for control. Such models need to strike the right balance between accuracy of the model and tractability. The goal of this paper is to provide a medium-grained stochastic hybrid model to represent a population of appliances that belong to two classes: deferrable or thermostatically controlled loads. We preserve quantized information regarding individual load constraints, while discarding information about the identity of appliance owners. The advantages of our proposed population model are 1) it allows us to model and control load in a scalable fashion, useful for ex-ante planning by an aggregator or for real-time load control; 2) it allows for the preservation of the privacy of end-use customers that own submetered or directly controlled appliances.
  • We study the problem of optimal incentive design for voluntary participation of electricity customers in a Direct Load Scheduling (DLS) program, a new form of Direct Load Control (DLC) based on a three way communication protocol between customers, embedded controls in flexible appliances, and the central entity in charge of the program. Participation decisions are made in real-time on an event-based basis, with every customer that needs to use a flexible appliance considering whether to join the program given current incentives. Customers have different interpretations of the level of risk associated with committing to pass over the control over the consumption schedule of their devices to an operator, and these risk levels are only privately known. The operator maximizes his expected profit of operating the DLS program by posting the right participation incentives for different appliance types, in a publicly available and dynamically updated table. Customers are then faced with the dynamic decision making problem of whether to take the incentives and participate or not. We define an optimization framework to determine the profit-maximizing incentives for the operator. In doing so, we also investigate the utility that the operator expects to gain from recruiting different types of devices. These utilities also provide an upper-bound on the benefits that can be attained from any type of demand response program.
  • In this paper, we introduce a scalable model for the aggregate electricity demand of a fleet of electric vehicles, which can provide the right balance between model simplicity and accuracy. The model is based on classification of tasks with similar energy consumption characteristics into a finite number of clusters. The aggregator responsible for scheduling the charge of the vehicles has two goals: 1) to provide a hard QoS guarantee to the vehicles at the lowest possible cost; 2) to offer load or generation following services to the wholesale market. In order to achieve these goals, we combine the scalable demand model we propose with two scheduling mechanisms, a near-optimal and a heuristic technique. The performance of the two mechanisms is compared under a realistic setting in our numerical experiments.
  • It is anticipated that an uncoordinated operation of individual home energy management (HEM) systems in a neighborhood would have a rebound effect on the aggregate demand profile. To address this issue, this paper proposes a coordinated home energy management (CoHEM) architecture in which distributed HEM units collaborate with each other in order to keep the demand and supply balanced in their neighborhood. Assuming the energy requests by customers are random in time, we formulate the proposed CoHEM design as a multi-stage stochastic optimization problem. We propose novel models to describe the deferrable appliance load (e.g., Plug-in (Hybrid) Electric Vehicles (PHEV)), and apply approximation and decomposition techniques to handle the considered design problem in a decentralized fashion. The developed decentralized CoHEM algorithm allow the customers to locally compute their scheduling solutions using domestic user information and with message exchange between their neighbors only. Extensive simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CoHEM architecture can effectively improve real-time power balancing. Extensions to joint power procurement and real-time CoHEM scheduling are also presented.
  • This paper proposes a coordinated home energy management system (HEMS) architecture where the distributed residential units cooperate with each other to achieve real-time power balancing. The economic benefits for the retailer and incentives for the customers to participate in the proposed coordinated HEMS program are given. We formulate the coordinated HEMS design problem as a dynamic programming (DP) and use approximate DP approaches to efficiently handle the design problem. A distributed implementation algorithm based on the convex optimization based dual decomposition technique is also presented. Our focus in the current paper is on the deferrable appliances, such as Plug-in (Hybrid) Electric Vehicles (PHEV), in view of their higher impact on the grid stability. Simulation results shows that the proposed coordinated HEMS architecture can efficiently improve the real-time power balancing.
  • At present, the power grid has tight control over its dispatchable generation capacity but a very coarse control on the demand. Energy consumers are shielded from making price-aware decisions, which degrades the efficiency of the market. This state of affairs tends to favor fossil fuel generation over renewable sources. Because of the technological difficulties of storing electric energy, the quest for mechanisms that would make the demand for electricity controllable on a day-to-day basis is gaining prominence. The goal of this paper is to provide one such mechanisms, which we call Digital Direct Load Scheduling (DDLS). DDLS is a direct load control mechanism in which we unbundle individual requests for energy and digitize them so that they can be automatically scheduled in a cellular architecture. Specifically, rather than storing energy or interrupting the job of appliances, we choose to hold requests for energy in queues and optimize the service time of individual appliances belonging to a broad class which we refer to as "deferrable loads". The function of each neighborhood scheduler is to optimize the time at which these appliances start to function. This process is intended to shape the aggregate load profile of the neighborhood so as to optimize an objective function which incorporates the spot price of energy, and also allows distributed energy resources to supply part of the generation dynamically.