• Faraday waves are a classic example of a system in which an extended pattern emerges under spatially uniform forcing. Motivated by systems in which uniform excitation is not plausible, we study both experimentally and theoretically the effect of heterogeneous forcing on Faraday waves. Our experiments show that vibrations restricted to finite regions lead to the formation of localized subharmonic wave patterns and change the onset of the instability. The prototype model used for the theoretical calculations is the parametrically driven and damped nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, which is known to describe well Faraday-instability regimes. For an energy injection with a Gaussian spatial profile, we show that the evolution of the envelope of the wave pattern can be reduced to a Weber-equation eigenvalue problem. Our theoretical results provide very good predictions of our experimental observations provided that the decay length scale of the Gaussian profile is much larger than the pattern wavelength.
  • The influence of Raman scattering and higher order dispersions on solitons and frequency comb generation in silica microring resonators is investigated. The Raman effect introduces a threshold value in the resonator quality factor above which the frequency locked solitons can not exist and, instead, a rich dynamics characterized by generation of self-frequency shift- ing solitons and dispersive waves is observed. A mechanism of broadening of the Cherenkov radiation through Hopf instability of the frequency locked solitons is also reported.
  • It is analytically shown that symmetry breaking, in dissipative systems, affects the nature of the bifurcation at onset of instability resulting in transitions from super to subcritical bifurcations. In the case of a nonlinear fiber cavity, we have derived an amplitude equation to describe the nonlinear dynamics above threshold. An analytical expression of the critical transition curve is obtained and the predictions are in excellent agreement with the numerical solutions of the full dynamical model.
  • Freak waves, or rogue waves, are one of the fascinating manifestations of the strength of nature. These devastating walls of water appear from nowhere, are short-lived and extremely rare. Despite the large amount of research activities on this subject, neither the minimum ingredients required for their generation nor the mechanisms explaining their formation have been given. Today, it is possible to reproduce such kind of waves in optical fibre systems. In this context, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that convective instability is the basic ingredient for the formation of rogue waves. This explains why rogues waves are extremely sensitive to noisy environments.
  • We show that the combined action of diffraction and convection (walk-off) in wave mixing processes leads to a nonlinear-symmetry-breaking in the generated traveling waves. The dynamics near to threshold is reduced to a Ginzburg-Landau model, showing an original dependence of the nonlinear self-coupling term on the convection. Analytical expressions of the intensity and the velocity of traveling waves emphasize the utmost importance of convection in this phenomenon. These predictions are in excellent agreement with the numerical solutions of the full dynamical model.