• Jupiter-family Comet D/1770 L1 (Lexell) was the first discovered Near-Earth Object (NEO), and passed the Earth on 1770 Jul 1 at a recorded distance of 0.015 au. The comet was subsequently lost due to unfavorable observing circumstances during its next apparition followed by a close encounter with Jupiter in 1779. Since then, the fate of D/Lexell has attracted interest from the scientific community, and now we revisit this long-standing question. We investigate the dynamical evolution of D/Lexell based on a set of orbits recalculated using the observations made by Charles Messier, the comet's discoverer, and find that there is a $98\%$ chance that D/Lexell remains in the Solar System by the year of 2000. This finding remains valid even if a moderate non-gravitational effect is imposed. Messier's observations also suggest that the comet is one of the largest known near-Earth comets, with a nucleus of $\gtrsim 10$ km in diameter. This implies that the comet should have been detected by contemporary NEO surveys regardless of its activity level if it has remained in the inner Solar System. We identify asteroid 2010 JL$_{33}$ as a possible descendant of D/Lexell, with a $0.8\%$ probability of chance alignment, but a direct orbital linkage of the two bodies has not been successfully accomplished. We also use the recalculated orbit to investigate the meteors potentially originating from D/Lexell. While no associated meteors have been unambiguously detected, we show that meteor observations can be used to better constrain the orbit of D/Lexell despite the comet being long lost.
  • We present a study of comet C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) using prediscovery archival data taken from 2013 to 2017. Our measurements show that the comet has been marginally increasing in activity since at least 2013 May (heliocentric distance of $r_{\mathrm{H}} = 23.7$ AU pre-perihelion). We estimate the mass-loss rate during the period 2013--2017 as $\overline{\dot{M}} \approx \left(2.4 \pm 1.1 \right) \times 10^{2}$ kg s$^{-1}$, which requires a minimum active surface area of $\sim$10--10$^2$ km$^{2}$ for sublimation of supervolatiles such as CO and CO$_2$, by assuming a nominal cometary albedo $p_V = 0.04 \pm 0.02$. The corresponding lower limit to the nucleus radius is a few kilometers. Our Monte Carlo dust simulations show that dust grains in the coma are $\gtrsim0.5$ mm in radius, with ejection speeds from $\sim$1--3 m s$^{-1}$, and have been emitted in a protracted manner since 2013, confirming estimates by Jewitt et al. (2017). The current heliocentric orbit is hyperbolic. Our N-body backward dynamical integration of the orbit suggests that the comet is most likely (with a probability of $\sim$98\%) from the Oort spike. The calculated median reciprocal of the semimajor axis 1 Myr ago was $a_{\mathrm{med}}^{-1} = \left( 3.61 \pm 1.71 \right) \times 10^{-5}$ AU$^{-1}$ (in a reference system of the solar-system barycentre).
  • We present observations showing in-bound long-period comet C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) to be active at record heliocentric distance. Nucleus temperatures are too low (60 K to 70 K) either for water ice to sublimate or for amorphous ice to crystallize, requiring another source for the observed activity. Using the Hubble Space Telescope we find a sharply-bounded, circularly symmetric dust coma 10$^5$ km in radius, with a total scattering cross section of $\sim$10$^5$ km$^2$. The coma has a logarithmic surface brightness gradient -1 over much of its surface, indicating sustained, steady-state dust production. A lack of clear evidence for the action of solar radiation pressure suggests that the dust particles are large, with a mean size $\gtrsim$ 0.1 mm. Using a coma convolution model, we find a limit to the apparent magnitude of the nucleus $V >$ 25.2 (absolute magnitude $H >$ 12.9). With assumed geometric albedo $p_V$ = 0.04, the limit to the nucleus circular equivalent radius is $<$ 9 km. Pre-discovery observations from 2013 show that the comet was also active at 23.7 AU heliocentric distance. While neither water ice sublimation nor exothermic crystallization can account for the observed distant activity, the measured properties are consistent with activity driven by sublimating supervolatile ices such as CO$_2$, CO, O$_2$ and N$_2$. Survival of supervolatiles at the nucleus surface is likely a result of the comet's recent arrival from the frigid Oort cloud.
  • We review the evidence for buried ice in the asteroid belt; specifically the questions around the so-called Main Belt Comets (MBCs). We summarise the evidence for water throughout the Solar System, and describe the various methods for detecting it, including remote sensing from ultraviolet to radio wavelengths. We review progress in the first decade of study of MBCs, including observations, modelling of ice survival, and discussion on their origins. We then look at which methods will likely be most effective for further progress, including the key challenge of direct detection of (escaping) water in these bodies.
  • We present a photometric and astrometric study of the split active asteroid P/2016 J1 (PANSTARRS). The two components (hereafter J1-A and J1-B) separated either $\sim$1500 days (2012 May to June) or 2300 days (2010 April) prior to the current epoch, with a separation speed $V_{\mathrm{sep}} = 0.70 \pm 0.02$ m s$^{-1}$ for the former scenario, or $0.83 \pm 0.06$ m s$^{-1}$ for the latter. Keck photometry reveals that the two fragments have similar, Sun-like colors which are comparable to the colors of primitive C- and G-type asteroids. With a nominal comet-like albedo, $p_{R} = 0.04$, the effective, dust-contaminated cross sections are estimated to be 2.4 km$^{2}$ for J1-A, and 0.5 km$^{2}$ for J1-B. We estimate that the nucleus radii lie in the range $140 \lesssim R_{\mathrm{N}} \lesssim 900$ m for J1-A and $40 \lesssim R_{\mathrm{N}} \lesssim 400$ m, for J1-B. A syndyne-synchrone simulation shows that both components have been active for 3 to 6 months, by ejecting dust grains at speeds $\sim$0.5 m s$^{-1}$ with rates $\sim$1 kg s$^{-1}$ for J1-A and 0.1 kg s$^{-1}$ for J1-B. In its present orbit, the rotational spin-up and devolatilization times of 2016 J1 are very small compared to the age of the solar system, raising the question of why this object still exists. We suggest that ice that was formerly buried within this asteroid became exposed at the surface, perhaps via a small impact, and that sublimation torques then rapidly drove it to break-up. Further disintegration events are anticipated due to the rotational instability.
  • Comets can exhibit non-gravitational accelerations caused by recoil forces due to anisotropic mass loss. So might active asteroids. We present an astrometric investigation of 18 active asteroids in search of non-gravitational acceleration. Statistically significant (signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) $> 3$) detections are obtained in three objects: 313P/Gibbs, 324P/La Sagra and (3200) Phaethon. The strongest and most convincing detection ($>$7$\sigma$ in each of three orthogonal components of the acceleration), is for the $\sim$1 km diameter nucleus of 324P/La Sagra. A 4.5$\sigma$ detection of the transverse component of the acceleration of 313P/Gibbs (also $\sim$1 km in diameter) is likely genuine too, as evidenced by the stability of the solution to the rejection or inclusion of specific astrometric datasets. We also find a 3.4$\sigma$ radial-component detection for $\sim$5 km diameter (3200) Phaethon, but this detection is more sensitive to the inclusion of specific datasets, suggesting that it is likely spurious in origin. The other 15 active asteroids in our sample all show non-gravitational accelerations consistent with zero. We explore different physical mechanisms which may give rise to the observed non-gravitational effects, and estimate mass-loss rates from the non-gravitational accelerations. We present a revised momentum-transfer law based on a physically realistic sublimation model for future work on non-gravitational forces, but note that it has little effect on the derived orbital elements.
  • We present a study of the active asteroid (3200) Phaethon in the 2016 apparition using the STEREO spacecraft and compare the results with data from the previous two perihelia in 2009 and 2012. Once again, Phaethon brightened by $\sim$2 mag soon after its perihelion passage, contradicting expectations from the phase function of a macroscopic monolithic body. Subsequently, a short antisolar tail of $\sim$0{\deg}.1 in length was formed within $\sim$1 day and quickly disappeared. No trail was seen. Our syndyne-synchrone analysis indicates that the tail was comprised of submicron to micron particles and can be approximated by a synchrone coinciding with the outburst. We estimate that the outburst has released a mass of $\sim$10$^{4}$--10$^{5}$ kg, comparable to the two mass ejections in 2009 and 2012, and that the average mass-loss rate is $\sim$0.1--1 kg s$^{-1}$. The forward-scattering effect hinted at low level activity of Phaethon prior to the outburst, which increased the effective cross section by merely $\lesssim$1 km$^2$. Without the forward-scattering enhancement, detecting such activity at side-scattering phase angles is very difficult. The forward-scattering effect also reinforces that the ejected dust grains rather than gas emissions were responsible for the activity of Phaethon. Despite Phaethon's reactivation, it is highly unlikely that the Geminid meteoroid stream can be sustained by similar perihelion mass-loss events.
  • Encke-type comet 332P/Ikeya-Murakami is experiencing cascading fragmentation events during its 2016 apparition. It is likely the first splitting Encke-type comet ever being observed. A nongravitational solution to the astrometry reveals a statistical detection of the radial and transverse nongravitational parameters, $A_{1} = \left(1.54 \pm 0.39\right) \times 10^{-8}$ AU day$^{-2}$, and $A_{2} = \left(7.19 \pm 1.92\right) \times 10^{-9}$ AU day$^{-2}$, respectively, which implies a nucleus erosion rate of $\left(0.91 \pm 0.17\right)$% per orbital revolution. The mass-loss rate likely has to be supported by a much larger fraction of an active surface area than known cases of short-period comets; it may be relevant to the ongoing fragmentation. We failed to detect any serendipitous pre-discovery observations of the comet in archival data from major sky surveys, whereby we infer that 332P used to be largely inactive, and is perhaps among the few short-period comets which have been reactivated from weakly active or dormant states. We therefore constrain an upper limit to the nucleus size as $2.0 \pm 0.2$ km in radius. A search for small bodies in similar orbits to that of 332P reveals comet P/2010 B2 (WISE) as the best candidate. From an empirical generalised Jupiter-family (Encke-type included) comet population model, we estimate the likelihood of chance alignment of the 332P--P/2010 B2 pair to be 1 in 33, a small number indicative of a genetic linkage between the two comets on a statistical basis. The pair possibly originated from a common progenitor which underwent a disintegration event well before the twentieth century.
  • We present initial time-resolved observations of the split comet 332P/Ikeya-Murakami taken using the Hubble Space Telescope. Our images reveal a dust-bathed cluster of fragments receding from their parent nucleus at projected speeds in the range 0.06 to 3.5 m s$^{-1}$ from which we estimate ejection times from October to December 2015. The number of fragments with effective radii $\gtrsim$20 m follows a differential power law with index $\gamma$ = -3.6$\pm$0.6, while smaller fragments are less abundant than expected from an extrapolation of this power-law. We argue that, in addition to losses due to observational selection, torques from anisotropic outgassing are capable of destroying the small fragments by driving them quickly to rotational instability. Specifically, the spin-up times of fragments $\lesssim$20 m in radius are shorter than the time elapsed since ejection from the parent nucleus. The effective radius of the parent nucleus is $r_e \le$ 275 m (geometric albedo 0.04 assumed). This is about seven times smaller than previous estimates and results in a nucleus mass at least 300 times smaller than previously thought. The mass in solid pieces, $2\times10^9$ kg, is about 4% of the mass of the parent nucleus. As a result of its small size, the parent nucleus also has a short spin-up time. Brightness variations in time-resolved nucleus photometry are consistent with rotational instability playing a role in the release of fragments.
  • We describe 2016 January to April observations of the fragments of 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, a comet earlier observed in a 2010 October outburst (Ishiguro et al 2014). We present photometry of the fragments, and perform simulations to infer the time of breakup. We argue that the eastern-most rapidly brightening fragment ($F4$) best corresponds to the original nucleus, rather than the initial bright fragment $F1$. We compute radial and tangential non-gravitational parameters, $A_1 = (1.5 \pm 0.4) \times 10^{-8}$ AU day$^{-2}$ and $(7.2 \pm 1.9) \times 10^{-9}$ AU day$^{-2}$; both are consistent with zero at the $4\sigma$ level. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the fragments were emitted on the outbound journey well after the 2010 outburst, with bright fragment $F1$ splitting in mid--2013 and the fainter fragments within months of the 2016 January recovery. Western fragment $F7$ is the oldest, dating from 2011. We suggest that the delayed onset of the splitting is consistent with a self-propagating crystallization of water ice.
  • Jupiter-family comet 15P/Finlay has been reportedly quiet in activity for over a century but has harbored two outbursts during its 2014/2015 perihelion passage. Here we present an analysis of these two outbursts using a set of cometary observations. The outbursts took place between 2014 Dec. 15.4--16.0 UT and 2015 Jan. 15.5--16.0 UT as constrained by ground-based and spacecraft observations. We find a characteristic ejection speed of $V_0=300$ to $650 \mathrm{m \cdot s^{-1}}$ for the ejecta of the first outburst and $V_0=550$ to $750 \mathrm{m \cdot s^{-1}}$ for that of the second outburst using a Monte Carlo dust model. The mass of the ejecta is calculated to be $M_\mathrm{d}=2$ to $3\times10^5 \mathrm{kg}$ for the first outburst and $M_\mathrm{d}=4$ to $5\times10^5 \mathrm{kg}$ for the second outburst, corresponds to less than $10^{-7}$ of the nucleus mass. The specific energy of the two outbursts is found to be $0.3$ to $2\times10^5 \mathrm{J \cdot kg^{-1}}$. We also revisit the long-standing puzzle of the non-detection of the hypothetical Finlayid meteor shower by performing a cued search using the 13-year data from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which does not reveal any positives. The Earth will pass the 2014/2015 outburst ejecta around 2021 Oct. 6 at 22 h UT to Oct. 7 at 1 h UT, with a chance for some significant meteor activity in the radio range, which may provide further clues to the Finlayid puzzle. A southerly radiant in the constellation of Ara will favor the observers in the southern tip of Africa.
  • We present studies of C/2015 D1 (SOHO), the first sunskirting comet ever seen from ground stations over the past half century. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) witnessed its peculiar light curve with a huge dip followed by a flareup around perihelion: the dip was likely caused by sublimation of olivines, directly evidenced by a coincident temporary disappearance of the tail. The flareup likely reflects a disintegration event, which we suggest was triggered by intense thermal stress established within the nucleus interior. Photometric data reveal an increasingly dusty coma, indicative of volatile depletion. A catastrophic mass loss rate of $\sim$10$^{5}$ kg s$^{-1}$ around perihelion was seen. Ground-based Xingming Observatory spotted the post-perihelion debris cloud. Our morphological simulations of post-perihelion images find newly released dust grains of size $a \gtrsim 10$ $\mu$m in radius, however, a temporal increase in $a_{\min}$ was also witnessed, possibly due to swift dispersions of smaller grains swept away by radiation forces without replenishment. Together with the fading profile of the light curve, a power law dust size distribution with index $\gamma = 3.2 \pm 0.1$ is derived. We detected no active remaining cometary nuclei over $\sim$0.1 km in radius in post-perihelion images acquired at Lowell Observatory. Applying radial non-gravitational parameter, $\mathcal{A}_{1} = \left(1.209 \pm 0.118 \right) \times 10^{-6}$ AU day$^{-2}$, from an isothermal water-ice sublimation model to the SOHO astrometry significantly reduces residuals and sinusoidal trends in the orbit determination. The nucleus mass $\sim$10$^{8}$--10$^{9}$ kg, and the radius $\sim$50--150 m (bulk density $\rho_{\mathrm{d}} = 0.4$ g cm$^{-3}$ assumed) before the disintegration are deduced from the photometric data; consistent results were determined from the non-gravitational effects.
  • It is speculated that some weakly active comets may be transitional objects between active and dormant comets. These objects are at a unique stage of the evolution of cometary nuclei, as they are still identifiable as active comets, in contrast to inactive comets that are observationally indistinguishable from low albedo asteroids. In this paper, we present a synthesis of comet and meteor observations of Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR, one of the most weakly active comets recorded to-date. Images taken by the Xingming 0.35-m telescope and the Gemini Flamingo-2 camera are modeled by a Monte Carlo dust model, which yields a low dust ejection speed ($1/10$ of that of moderately active comets), dominance of large dust grains, and a low dust production of $0.4~\mathrm{kg \cdot s^{-1}}$ at 19~d after the 2014 perihelion passage. We also find a reddish nucleus of 209P/LINEAR that is similar to D-type asteroids and most Trojan asteroids. Meteor observations with the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR), coupled with meteoroid stream modeling, suggest a low dust production of the parent over the past few hundred orbits, although there are hints of a some temporary increase in activity in the 18th century. Dynamical simulations indicate 209P/LINEAR may have resided in a stable near-Earth orbit for $\sim 10^4$~yr, which is significantly longer than typical JFCs. All these lines of evidence imply that 209P/LINEAR as an aging comet quietly exhausting its remaining near surface volatiles. We also compare 209P/LINEAR to other low activity comets, where evidence for a diversity of the origin of low activity is seen.
  • We present initial observations of the newly-discovered active asteroid 313P/Gibbs (formerly P/2014 S4), taken to characterize its nucleus and comet-like activity. The central object has a radius $\sim$0.5 km (geometric albedo 0.05 assumed). We find no evidence for secondary nuclei and set (with qualifications) an upper limit to the radii of such objects near 25 m, assuming the same albedo. Both aperture photometry and a morphological analysis of the ejected dust show that mass-loss is continuous at rates $\sim$0.2 to 0.4 kg s$^{-1}$, inconsistent with an impact origin. Large dust particles, with radii $\sim$50 to 100 $\mu$m, dominate the optical appearance. At 2.4 AU from the Sun, the surface equilibrium temperatures are too low for thermal or desiccation stresses to be responsible for the ejection of dust. No gas is spectroscopically detected (limiting the gas mass loss rate to $<$1.8 kg s$^{-1}$). However, the protracted emission of dust seen in our data and the detection of another episode of dust release near perihelion, in archival observations from 2003, are highly suggestive of an origin by the sublimation of ice. Coincidentally, the orbit of 313P/Gibbs is similar to those of several active asteroids independently suspected to be ice sublimators, including P/2012 T1, 238P/Read and 133P/Elst-Pizarro, suggesting that ice is abundant in the outer asteroid belt.
  • The Kreutz family of sungrazing comets contains over 2~000 known members, many of which are believed to be under $\sim 100$~m sizes (\textit{mini~comets}) and have only been studied at small heliocentric distances ($r_\mathrm{H}$) with space-based SOHO/STEREO spacecraft. To understand the brightening process of mini Kreutz comets, we conducted a survey using CFHT/MegaCam at moderate $r_\mathrm{H}$ guided by SOHO/STEREO observations. We identify two comets that should be in our search area but are not detected, indicating that the comets have either followed a steeper brightening rate within the previously-reported rapid brighten stage (the \textit{brightening~burst}), or the brightening burst starts earlier than expected. We present a composite analysis of pre-perihelion light-curves of five Kreutz comets that covered to $\sim 1$~AU. We observe a significant diversity in the light-curves that can be used to grossly classify them into two types: C/Ikeya-Seki and C/SWAN follow the canonical $r_\mathrm{H}^{-4}$ while the others follow $r_\mathrm{H}^{-7}$. In particular, C/SWAN seems to have undergone an outburst ($\Delta m>5$~mag) or a rapid brightening ($n\gtrsim11$) between $r_\mathrm{H}=1.06$~AU to $0.52$~AU, and shows hints of structural/compositional differences compared to other bright Kreutz comets. We also find evidence that the Kreutz comets as a population lose their mass less efficiently than the dynamically new comet, C/ISON, and are relatively devoid of species that drive C/ISON's activity at large $r_\mathrm{H}$. Concurrent observations of C/STEREO in different wavelengths also suggest that a blue-ward species such as CN may be the main driver for brightening burst instead of previously-thought sodium.
  • The dynamically new comet, C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring), is to make a close approach to Mars on 2014 October 19 at 18:30 UT at a distance of 40+/-1 Martian radius. Such extremely rare event offers a precious opportunity for the spacecrafts on Mars to closely study a dynamically new comet itself as well as the planet-comet interaction. Meanwhile, the high speed meteoroids released from C/Siding Spring also pose a threat to physically damage the spacecrafts. Here we present our observations and modeling results of C/Siding Spring to characterize the comet and assess the risk posed to the spacecrafts on Mars. We find that the optical tail of C/Siding Spring is dominated by larger particles at the time of the observation. Synchrone simulation suggests that the comet was already active in late 2012 when it was more than 7 AU from the Sun. By parameterizing the dust activity with a semi-analytic model, we find that the ejection speed of C/Siding Spring is comparable to comets such as the target of the Rosetta mission, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Under nominal situation, the simulated dust cone will miss the planet by about 20 Martian radius. At the extreme ends of uncertainties, the simulated dust cone will engulf Mars, but the meteoric influx at Mars is still comparable to the nominal sporadic influx, seemly indicating that intense and enduring meteoroid bombardment due to C/Siding Spring is unlikely. Further simulation also suggests that gravitational disruption of the dust tail may be significant enough to be observable at Earth.