• We use high time cadence, high spectral resolution optical observations to detect excess H-alpha emission from the 2 - 3 Myr old weak lined T Tauri star PTFO8-8695. This excess emission appears to move in velocity as expected if it were produced by the suspected planetary companion to this young star. The excess emission is not always present, but when it is, the predicted velocity motion is often observed. We have considered the possibility that the observed excess emission is produced by stellar activity (flares), accretion from a disk, or a planetary companion; we find the planetary companion to be the most likely explanation. If this is the case, the strength of the H-alpha line indicates that the emission comes from an extended volume around the planet, likely fed by mass loss from the planet which is expected to be overflowing its Roche lobe.
  • Theoretical models and spectroscopic observations of newborn stars suggest that protoplantary disks have an inner "wall" at a distance set by the disk interaction with the star. Around T Tauri stars, the size of this disk hole is expected to be on a 0.1-AU scale that is unresolved by current adaptive optics imaging, though some model-dependent constraints have been obtained by near-infrared interferometry. Here we report the first measurement of the inner disk wall around a solar-mass young stellar object, YLW 16B in the {\rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region, by detecting the light travel time of the variable radiation from the stellar surface to the disk. Consistent time lags were detected on two nights, when the time series in H (1.6 {\mu}m) and K (2.2 {\mu}m) bands were synchronized while the 4.5 {\mu}m emission lagged by 74.5 +/- 3.2 seconds. Considering the nearly edge-on geometry of the disk, the inner rim should be 0.084 AU from the protostar on average, with an error of order 0.01 AU. This size is likely larger than the range of magnetospheric truncations, and consistent with an optically and geometrically thick disk front at the dust sublimation radius at ~1500 K. The widths of the cross-correlation functions between the data in different wavebands place possible new constraints on the geometry of the disk.
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • The classical T Tauri star AA Tau presented photometric variability attributed to an inner disk warp, caused by the interaction between the inner disk and an inclined magnetosphere. Previous studies of NGC 2264 have shown that similar photometric behavior is common among CTTS. The goal of this work is to investigate the main causes of the observed photometric variability of CTTS in NGC 2264 that present AA Tau-like light curves, and verify if an inner disk warp could be responsible for their variability. We investigate veiling variability in their spectra and u-r color variations and estimate parameters of the inner disk warp using an occultation model proposed for AA Tau. We compare infrared and optical light curves to analyze the dust responsible for the occultations. AA Tau-like variability is transient on a timescale of a few years. We ascribe it to stable accretion regimes and aperiodic variability to unstable accretion regimes and show that a transition, and even coexistence, between the two is common. We find evidence of hot spots associated with occultations, indicating that the occulting structures could be located at the base of accretion columns. We find average values of warp maximum height of 0.23 times its radial location, consistent with AA Tau, with variations of on average 11% between rotation cycles. We show that extinction laws in the inner disk indicate the presence of grains larger than interstellar grains. The inner disk warp scenario is consistent with observations for all but one periodic star in our sample. AA Tau-like systems comprise 14% of CTTS observed in NGC 2264, though this increases to 35% among systems of mass 0.7M_sun<M<2.0M_sun. Assuming random inclinations, we estimate that nearly all systems in this mass range likely possess an inner disk warp, possibly because of a change in magnetic field configurations among stars of lower mass.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.
  • We report on Submillimeter Array observations of the 870 micron continuum and CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) line emission of a faint object, SMM2E, near the driving source of the HH797 outflow in the IC348 cluster. The continuum emission shows an unresolved source for which we estimate a mass of gas and dust of 30 Mjup, and the CO(3-2) line reveals a compact bipolar outflow centred on SMM2E, and barely seen also in 13CO(2-1). In addition, C18O(2-1) emission reveals hints of a possible rotating envelope/disk perpendicular to the outflow, for which we infer a dynamical mass of ~16 Mjup. In order to further constrain the accreted mass of the object, we gathered data from Spitzer, Herschel, and new and archive submillimetre observations, and built the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). The SED can be fitted with one single modified black-body from 70 micron down to 2.1 cm, using a dust temperature of ~24 K, a dust emissivity index of 0.8, and an envelope mass of ~35 Mjup. The bolometric luminosity is 0.10 Lsun, and the bolometric temperature is 35 K. Thus, SMM2E is comparable to the known Class 0 objects in the stellar domain. An estimate of the final mass indicates that SMM2E will most likely remain substellar, and the SMM2E outflow force matches the trend with luminosity known for young stellar objects. Thus, SMM2E constitutes an excellent example of a Class 0 proto-brown dwarf candidate which forms as a scaled-down version of low-mass stars. Finally, SMM2E seems to be part of a wide (~2400 AU) multiple system of Class 0 sources.
  • We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30-day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes, and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical "dippers" having discrete fading events lasting ~1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H$\alpha$ emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.
  • Based on more than four weeks of continuous high cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects (YSOs) whose optical variability is dominated by short duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief -- several hour to one day -- brightenings at optical and near-infrared (IR) wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range 5-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a thirty day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u-g vs. g-r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Halpha equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Halpha emission profiles or profiles with blue-shifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Amongst the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Halpha equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.
  • We present the discovery of CoRoT 223992193, a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, comprising two pre-main sequence M dwarfs, discovered by the CoRoT space mission during a 23-day observation of the 3 Myr old NGC 2264 star-forming region. Using multi-epoch optical and near-IR follow-up spectroscopy with FLAMES on the Very Large Telescope and ISIS on the William Herschel Telescope we obtain a full orbital solution and derive the fundamental parameters of both stars by modelling the light curve and radial velocity data. The orbit is circular and has a period of $3.8745745 \pm 0.0000014$ days. The masses and radii of the two stars are $0.67 \pm 0.01$ and $0.495 \pm 0.007$ $M_{\odot}$ and $1.30 \pm 0.04$ and $1.11 ~^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$ $R_{\odot}$, respectively. This system is a useful test of evolutionary models of young low-mass stars, as it lies in a region of parameter space where observational constraints are scarce; comparison with these models indicates an apparent age of $\sim$3.5-6 Myr. The systemic velocity is within $1\sigma$ of the cluster value which, along with the presence of lithium absorption, strongly indicates cluster membership. The CoRoT light curve also contains large-amplitude, rapidly evolving out-of-eclipse variations, which are difficult to explain using starspots alone. The system's spectral energy distribution reveals a mid-infrared excess, which we model as thermal emission from a small amount of dust located in the inner cavity of a circumbinary disk. In turn, this opens up the possibility that some of the out-of-eclipse variability could be due to occultations of the central stars by material located at the inner edge or in the central cavity of the circumbinary disk.
  • The Substellar Initial Mass Function (SIMF) of many star-forming regions is still poorly known but the detailed knowledge of its shape will help to distinguish among the substellar formation theories. The Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is one of the most extensively studied star forming regions. We here present deep, wide-field JHK observations of the ONC taken with HAWK-I@VLT. These observations extend the IMF into the brown dwarf and free-floating planetary mass regime with unprecedented sensitivity. To obtain a clean sample of ONC members, we exclude potential background sources with the help of CO extinction maps. Masses are assigned by means of evolutionary tracks in the H vs. J-H Color-Magnitude Diagram (CMD). Besides the well known stellar peak at ~0.25 M_sun we find a pronounced second peak at ~0.04 M_sun in the SIMF and indications for a third rise in the free-floating planetary mass regime.
  • Recent studies have identified several young stellar objects (YSOs) which exhibit significant mid-infrared (mid-IR) variability. A wide range of physical mechanisms may be responsible for these variations, including changes in a YSO's accretion rate or in the extinction or emission from the inner disk. We have obtained and analyzed multi-epoch near-infrared (NIR) spectra for five actively accreting YSOs in the $\rho$ Oph star-forming region along with contemporaneous mid-IR light curves obtained as part of the YSOVAR Spitzer/IRAC survey. Four of the five YSOs exhibit mid-IR light curves with modest ($\sim 0.2$--0.4 mag) but statistically significant variations over our 40-day observation window. Measuring the strengths of prominent photospheric absorption lines and accretion sensitive \ion{H}{1} and \ion{He}{1} lines in each NIR spectrum, we derive estimates of each YSO's spectral type, effective temperature ({\Teff}), and $H$ band extinction ($A_H$), and analyze the time evolution of their NIR veiling ($r_H$ and $r_K$) and mass accretion rates ({\Macc}). Defining a YSO's evolutionary stage such that heavily veiled, high accretion rate objects are less evolved than those with lower levels of veiling and ongoing accretion, we infer that GY 314 is the most evolved YSO in our sample, with GY 308 and GY 292 at progressively earlier evolutionary stages. Leveraging our multi-epoch, multi-wavelength dataset, we detect significant variations in mass accretion rates over timescales of days to weeks, but find that extinction levels in these YSOs remain relatively constant. We find no correlation between these YSO mid-IR light curves and time-resolved veiling or mass accretion rates, such that we are unable to link their mid-IR variability with physical processes localized near the inner edge of the circumstellar disk or within regions which are directly responsive to mass accretion...
  • We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of six Y dwarfs (see Cushing et al), eighty-nine T dwarfs, eight L dwarfs, and one M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types greater than or equal to T6, six of which have been announced earlier in Mainzer et al and Burgasser et al. We present color-color and color-type diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. Near-infrared classifications as late as early Y are presented and objects with peculiar spectra are discussed. After deriving an absolute WISE 4.6 um (W2) magnitude vs. spectral type relation, we estimate spectrophotometric distances to our discoveries. We also use available astrometric measurements to provide preliminary trigonometric parallaxes to four our discoveries, which have types of L9 pec (red), T8, T9, and Y0; all of these lie within 10 pc of the Sun. The Y0 dwarf, WISE 1541-2250, is the closest at 2.8 (+1.3,-0.6) pc; if this 2.8 pc value persists after continued monitoring, WISE 1541-2250 will become the seventh closest stellar system to the Sun. Another ten objects, with types between T6 and >Y0, have spectrophotometric distance estimates also placing them within 10 pc. The closest of these, the T6 dwarf WISE 1506+7027, is believed to fall at a distance of roughly 4.9 pc. WISE multi-epoch positions supplemented with positional info primarily from Spitzer/IRAC allow us to calculate proper motions and tangential velocities for roughly one half of the new discoveries. This work represents the first step by WISE to complete a full-sky, volume-limited census of late-T and Y dwarfs. Using early results from this census, we present preliminary, lower limits to the space density of these objects and discuss constraints on both the functional form of the mass function and the low-mass limit of star formation.
  • Variability is a defining characteristic of young stellar systems, and optical variability has been heavily studied to select and characterize the photospheric properties of young stars. In recent years, multi-epoch observations sampling a wider range of wavelengths and time-scales have revealed a wealth of time-variable phenomena at work during the star formation process. This splinter session was convened to summarize recent progress in providing improved coverage and understanding of time-variable processes in young stars and circumstellar disks. We begin by summarizing results from several multi-epoch Spitzer campaigns, which have demonstrated that many young stellar objects evidence significant mid-IR variability. While some of these variations can be attributed to processes in the stellar photosphere, others appear to trace short time-scale changes in the circumstellar disk which can be successfully modeled with axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric structures. We also review recent studies probing variability at shorter wavelengths that provide evidence for high frequency pulsations associated with accretion outbursts, correlated optical/X-ray variability in Classical T Tauri stars, and magnetic reversals in young solar analogs.
  • We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar type and the low mass stellar population of the young (~5 Myr) Lambda Orionis cluster. Combining optical and 2MASS photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 solar mass to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution (SED) slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with ``evolved disks''( with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and ``transitional disks'' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ~6% for K type stars (Rc-J<2) to ~27% for stars with spectral type M5 or later (Rc-J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the Lambda Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ~5 Myr.
  • We combine published optical and near-infrared photometry to identify new low-mass candidate members in an area of about 0.64 deg^2 in Corona Australis, using the S-parameter method. Five new candidate members of the region are selected, with estimated ages between 3 and 15 Myr, and masses between 0.05 and 0.15 M_Sun. Using Spitzer photometry, we confirm that these objects are not surrounded by optically thick disks. However, one of them is found to display excess at 24 micron, thus suggesting it harbours a disk with an inner hole. With an estimated mass of 0.07 M_Sun according to the SED fitting, this is one of the lowest-mass objects reported to possess a transitional disk. Including these new members, the fraction of disks is about 50% among the total Corona Australis population selected by the same criteria, lower than the 70% fraction reported earlier for this region. Even so, we find a ratio of transitional to primordial disks (45%) very similar to the value derived by other authors. This ratio is higher than for solar-type stars (5-10%), suggesting that disk evolution is faster in the latter, and/or that the "transitional disk" stage is not such a short-lived step in the case of very low-mass objects. However, this impression needs to be confirmed with better statistics.