• Sidorenko's Conjecture asserts that every bipartite graph H has the Sidorenko property, i.e., a quasirandom graph minimizes the density of H among all graphs with the same edge density. We study a stronger property, which requires that a quasirandom multipartite graph minimizes the density of H among all graphs with the same edge densities between its parts; this property is called the step Sidorenko property. We show that many bipartite graphs fail to have the step Sidorenko property and use our results to show the existence of a bipartite edge-transitive graph that is not weakly norming; this answers a question of Hatami [Israel J. Math. 175 (2010), 125-150].
  • We study the Directed Feedback Vertex Set problem parameterized by the treewidth of the input graph. We prove that unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis fails, the problem cannot be solved in time $2^{o(t\log t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$ on general directed graphs, where $t$ is the treewidth of the underlying undirected graph. This is matched by a dynamic programming algorithm with running time $2^{\mathcal{O}(t\log t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$. On the other hand, we show that if the input digraph is planar, then the running time can be improved to $2^{\mathcal{O}(t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$.
  • The notion of Turing kernelization investigates whether a polynomial-time algorithm can solve an NP-hard problem, when it is aided by an oracle that can be queried for the answers to bounded-size subproblems. One of the main open problems in this direction is whether k-Path admits a polynomial Turing kernel: can a polynomial-time algorithm determine whether an undirected graph has a simple path of length k, using an oracle that answers queries of size poly(k)? We show this can be done when the input graph avoids a fixed graph H as a topological minor, thereby significantly generalizing an earlier result for bounded-degree and $K_{3,t}$-minor-free graphs. Moreover, we show that k-Path even admits a polynomial Turing kernel when the input graph is not H-topological-minor-free itself, but contains a known vertex modulator of size bounded polynomially in the parameter, whose deletion makes it so. To obtain our results, we build on the graph minors decomposition to show that any H-topological-minor-free graph that does not contain a k-path, has a separation that can safely be reduced after communication with the oracle.
  • In the Edge Bipartization problem one is given an undirected graph $G$ and an integer $k$, and the question is whether $k$ edges can be deleted from $G$ so that it becomes bipartite. In 2006, Guo et al. [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., 72(8):1386-1396, 2006] proposed an algorithm solving this problem in time $O(2^k m^2)$; today, this algorithm is a textbook example of an application of the iterative compression technique. Despite extensive progress in the understanding of the parameterized complexity of graph separation problems in the recent years, no significant improvement upon this result has been yet reported. We present an algorithm for Edge Bipartization that works in time $O(1.977^k nm)$, which is the first algorithm with the running time dependence on the parameter better than $2^k$. To this end, we combine the general iterative compression strategy of Guo et al. [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., 72(8):1386-1396, 2006], the technique proposed by Wahlstrom [SODA 2014, 1762-1781] of using a polynomial-time solvable relaxation in the form of a Valued Constraint Satisfaction Problem to guide a bounded-depth branching algorithm, and an involved Measure & Conquer analysis of the recursion tree.
  • We consider the following problem for a fixed graph H: given a graph G and two H-colorings of G, i.e. homomorphisms from G to H, can one be transformed (reconfigured) into the other by changing one color at a time, maintaining an H-coloring throughout. This is the same as finding a path in the Hom(G,H) complex. For H=K_k this is the problem of finding paths between k-colorings, which was shown to be in P for k<=3 and PSPACE-complete otherwise by Cereceda et al. 2011. We generalize the positive side of this dichotomy by providing an algorithm that solves the problem in polynomial time for any H with no C_4 subgraph. This gives a large class of constraints for which finding solutions to the Constraint Satisfaction Problem is NP-complete, but finding paths in the solution space is P. The algorithm uses a characterization of possible reconfiguration sequences (paths in Hom(G,H)), whose main part is a purely topological condition described in algebraic terms of the fundamental groupoid of H seen as a topological space.
  • In the multicoloring problem, also known as ($a$:$b$)-coloring or $b$-fold coloring, we are given a graph G and a set of $a$ colors, and the task is to assign a subset of $b$ colors to each vertex of G so that adjacent vertices receive disjoint color subsets. This natural generalization of the classic coloring problem (the $b=1$ case) is equivalent to finding a homomorphism to the Kneser graph $KG_{a,b}$, and gives relaxations approaching the fractional chromatic number. We study the complexity of determining whether a graph has an ($a$:$b$)-coloring. Our main result is that this problem does not admit an algorithm with running time $f(b)\cdot 2^{o(\log b)\cdot n}$, for any computable $f(b)$, unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH) fails. A $(b+1)^n\cdot \text{poly}(n)$-time algorithm due to Nederlof [2008] shows that this is tight. A direct corollary of our result is that the graph homomorphism problem does not admit a $2^{O(n+h)}$ algorithm unless ETH fails, even if the target graph is required to be a Kneser graph. This refines the understanding given by the recent lower bound of Cygan et al. [SODA 2016]. The crucial ingredient in our hardness reduction is the usage of detecting matrices of Lindstr\"om [Canad. Math. Bull., 1965], which is a combinatorial tool that, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been used for proving complexity lower bounds. As a side result, we prove that the running time of the algorithms of Abasi et al. [MFCS 2014] and of Gabizon et al. [ESA 2015] for the r-monomial detection problem are optimal under ETH.
  • Cutwidth is one of the classic layout parameters for graphs. It measures how well one can order the vertices of a graph in a linear manner, so that the maximum number of edges between any prefix and its complement suffix is minimized. As graphs of cutwidth at most $k$ are closed under taking immersions, the results of Robertson and Seymour imply that there is a finite list of minimal immersion obstructions for admitting a cut layout of width at most $k$. We prove that every minimal immersion obstruction for cutwidth at most $k$ has size at most $2^{O(k^3\log k)}$. As an interesting algorithmic byproduct, we design a new fixed-parameter algorithm for computing the cutwidth of a graph that runs in time $2^{O(k^2\log k)}\cdot n$, where $k$ is the optimum width and $n$ is the number of vertices. While being slower by a $\log k$-factor in the exponent than the fastest known algorithm, given by Thilikos, Bodlaender, and Serna in [Cutwidth I: A linear time fixed parameter algorithm, J. Algorithms, 56(1):1--24, 2005] and [Cutwidth II: Algorithms for partial $w$-trees of bounded degree, J. Algorithms, 56(1):25--49, 2005], our algorithm has the advantage of being simpler and self-contained; arguably, it explains better the combinatorics of optimum-width layouts.
  • Suppose $\mathcal{F}$ is a finite family of graphs. We consider the following meta-problem, called $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion: given a graph $G$ and integer $k$, decide whether the deletion of at most $k$ edges of $G$ can result in a graph that does not contain any graph from $\mathcal{F}$ as an immersion. This problem is a close relative of the $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion problem studied by Fomin et al. [FOCS 2012], where one deletes vertices in order to remove all minor models of graphs from $\mathcal{F}$. We prove that whenever all graphs from $\mathcal{F}$ are connected and at least one graph of $\mathcal{F}$ is planar and subcubic, then the $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion problem admits: a constant-factor approximation algorithm running in time $O(m^3 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$; a linear kernel that can be computed in time $O(m^4 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$; and a $O(2^{O(k)} + m^4 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$-time fixed-parameter algorithm, where $n,m$ count the vertices and edges of the input graph. These results mirror the findings of Fomin et al. [FOCS 2012], who obtained a similar set of algorithmic results for $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion, under the assumption that at least one graph from $\mathcal{F}$ is planar. An important difference is that we are able to obtain a linear kernel for $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion, while the exponent of the kernel of Fomin et al. for $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion depends heavily on the family $\mathcal{F}$. In fact, this dependence is unavoidable under plausible complexity assumptions, as proven by Giannopoulou et al. [ICALP 2015]. This reveals that the kernelization complexity of $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion is quite different than that of $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion.
  • A graph K is square-free if it contains no four-cycle as a subgraph. A graph K is multiplicative if GxH -> K implies G -> K or H -> K, for all graphs G,H. Here GxH is the tensor (or categorical) graph product and G -> K denotes the existence of a graph homomorphism from G to K. Hedetniemi's conjecture states that all cliques K_n are multiplicative. However, the only non-trivial graphs known to be multiplicative are K_3, odd cycles, and still more generally, circular cliques $K_{p/q}$ with 2 <= p/q < 4. We make no progress for cliques, but show that all square-free graphs are multiplicative. In particular, this gives the first multiplicative graphs of chromatic number higher than 4. Generalizing, in terms of the box complex, the topological insight behind existing proofs for odd cycles, we also give a different proof for circular cliques.
  • Dynamic programming on path and tree decompositions of graphs is a technique that is ubiquitous in the field of parameterized and exponential-time algorithms. However, one of its drawbacks is that the space usage is exponential in the decomposition's width. Following the work of Allender et al. [Theory of Computing, '14], we investigate whether this space complexity explosion is unavoidable. Using the idea of reparameterization of Cai and Juedes [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., '03], we prove that the question is closely related to a conjecture that the Longest Common Subsequence problem parameterized by the number of input strings does not admit an algorithm that simultaneously uses XP time and FPT space. Moreover, we complete the complexity landscape sketched for pathwidth and treewidth by Allender et al. by considering the parameter tree-depth. We prove that computations on tree-depth decompositions correspond to a model of non-deterministic machines that work in polynomial time and logarithmic space, with access to an auxiliary stack of maximum height equal to the decomposition's depth. Together with the results of Allender et al., this describes a hierarchy of complexity classes for polynomial-time non-deterministic machines with different restrictions on the access to working space, which mirrors the classic relations between treewidth, pathwidth, and tree-depth.
  • We investigate the complexity of several fundamental polynomial-time solvable problems on graphs and on matrices, when the given instance has low treewidth; in the case of matrices, we consider the treewidth of the graph formed by non-zero entries. In each of the considered cases, the best known algorithms working on general graphs run in polynomial time, however the exponent of the polynomial is large. Therefore, our main goal is to construct algorithms with running time of the form $\textrm{poly}(k)\cdot n$ or $\textrm{poly}(k)\cdot n\log n$, where $k$ is the width of the tree decomposition given on the input. Such procedures would outperform the best known algorithms for the considered problems already for moderate values of the treewidth, like $O(n^{1/c})$ for some small constant $c$. Our results include: -- an algorithm for computing the determinant and the rank of an $n\times n$ matrix using $O(k^3\cdot n)$ time and arithmetic operations; -- an algorithm for solving a system of linear equations using $O(k^3\cdot n)$ time and arithmetic operations; -- an $O(k^3\cdot n\log n)$-time randomized algorithm for finding the cardinality of a maximum matching in a graph; -- an $O(k^4\cdot n\log^2 n)$-time randomized algorithm for constructing a maximum matching in a graph; -- an $O(k^2\cdot n\log n)$-time algorithm for finding a maximum vertex flow in a directed graph. Moreover, we give an approximation algorithm for treewidth with time complexity suited to the running times as above. Namely, the algorithm, when given a graph $G$ and integer $k$, runs in time $O(k^7\cdot n\log n)$ and either correctly reports that the treewidth of $G$ is larger than $k$, or constructs a tree decomposition of $G$ of width $O(k^2)$.
  • A graph is called (claw,diamond)-free if it contains neither a claw (a $K_{1,3}$) nor a diamond (a $K_4$ with an edge removed) as an induced subgraph. Equivalently, (claw,diamond)-free graphs can be characterized as line graphs of triangle-free graphs, or as linear dominoes, i.e., graphs in which every vertex is in at most two maximal cliques and every edge is in exactly one maximal clique. In this paper we consider the parameterized complexity of the (claw,diamond)-free Edge Deletion problem, where given a graph $G$ and a parameter $k$, the question is whether one can remove at most $k$ edges from $G$ to obtain a (claw,diamond)-free graph. Our main result is that this problem admits a polynomial kernel. We complement this finding by proving that, even on instances with maximum degree $6$, the problem is NP-complete and cannot be solved in time $2^{o(k)}\cdot |V(G)|^{O(1)}$ unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis fail
  • A vertex-subset graph problem $Q$ defines which subsets of the vertices of an input graph are feasible solutions. The reconfiguration version of a vertex-subset problem $Q$ asks whether it is possible to transform one feasible solution for $Q$ into another in at most $\ell$ steps, where each step is a vertex addition or deletion, and each intermediate set is also a feasible solution for $Q$ of size bounded by $k$. Motivated by recent results establishing W[1]-hardness of the reconfiguration versions of most vertex-subset problems parameterized by $\ell$, we investigate the complexity of such problems restricted to graphs of bounded treewidth. We show that the reconfiguration versions of most vertex-subset problems remain PSPACE-complete on graphs of treewidth at most $t$ but are fixed-parameter tractable parameterized by $\ell + t$ for all vertex-subset problems definable in monadic second-order logic (MSOL). To prove the latter result, we introduce a technique which allows us to circumvent cardinality constraints and define reconfiguration problems in MSOL.
  • We show that several reconfiguration problems known to be PSPACE-complete remain so even when limited to graphs of bounded bandwidth. The essential step is noticing the similarity to very limited string rewriting systems, whose ability to directly simulate Turing Machines is classically known. This resolves a question posed open in [Bonsma P., 2012]. On the other hand, we show that a large class of reconfiguration problems becomes tractable on graphs of bounded treedepth, and that this result is in some sense tight.
  • We present a polynomial-time algorithm that, given two independent sets in a claw-free graph $G$, decides whether one can be transformed into the other by a sequence of elementary steps. Each elementary step is to remove a vertex $v$ from the current independent set $S$ and to add a new vertex $w$ (not in $S$) such that the result is again an independent set. We also consider the more restricted model where $v$ and $w$ have to be adjacent.