• The next generation of cellular networks will exploit mmWave frequencies to dramatically increase the network capacity. The communication at such high frequencies, however, requires directionality to compensate the increase in propagation loss. Users and base stations need to align their beams during both initial access and data transmissions, to ensure the maximum gain is reached. The accuracy of the beam selection, and the delay in updating the beam pair or performing initial access, impact the end-to-end performance and the quality of service. In this paper we will present the beam management procedures that 3GPP has included in the NR specifications, focusing on the different operations that can be performed in Standalone (SA) and in Non-Standalone (NSA) deployments. We will also provide a performance comparison among different schemes, along with design insights on the most important parameters related to beam management frameworks.
  • A key enabler for the emerging autonomous and cooperative driving services is high-throughput and reliable Vehicle-to-Network (V2N) communication. In this respect, the millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies hold great promises because of the large available bandwidth which may provide the required link capacity. However, this potential is hindered by the challenging propagation characteristics of high-frequency channels and the dynamic topology of the vehicular scenarios, which affect the reliability of the connection. Moreover, mmWave transmissions typically leverage beamforming gain to compensate for the increased path loss experienced at high frequencies. This, however, requires fine alignment of the transmitting and receiving beams, which may be difficult in vehicular scenarios. Those limitations may undermine the performance of V2N communications and pose new challenges for proper vehicular communication design. In this paper, we study by simulation the practical feasibility of some mmWave-aware strategies to support V2N, in comparison to the traditional LTE connectivity below 6 GHz. The results show that the orchestration among different radios represents a viable solution to enable both high-capacity and robust V2N communications.
  • The communication at mmWave frequencies is a promising enabler for ultra high data rates in the next generation of mobile cellular networks (5G). The harsh propagation environment at such high frequencies, however, demands a dense base station deployment, which may be infeasible because of the unavailability of fiber drops to provide wired backhauling. To address this issue, 3GPP has recently proposed a Study Item on Integrated Access and Backhaul (IAB), i.e., on the possibility of providing the wireless backhaul together with the radio access to the mobile terminals. The design of IAB base stations and networks introduces new research challenges, especially when considering the demanding conditions at mmWave frequencies. In this paper we study different path selection techniques, using a distributed approach, and investigate their performance in terms of hop count and bottleneck Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) using a channel model based on real measurements. We show that there exist solutions that decrease the number of hops without affecting the bottleneck SNR and provide guidelines on the design of IAB path selection policies.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the availability of huge bandwidths to provide unprecedented data rates to next-generation cellular mobile terminals. However, mmWave links are highly susceptible to rapid channel variations and suffer from severe free-space pathloss and atmospheric absorption. To address these challenges, the base stations and the mobile terminals will use highly directional antennas to achieve sufficient link budget in wide area networks. The consequence is the need for precise alignment of the transmitter and the receiver beams, an operation which may increase the latency of establishing a link, and has important implications for control layer procedures, such as initial access, handover and beam tracking. This tutorial provides an overview of recently proposed measurement techniques for beam and mobility management in mmWave cellular networks, and gives insights into the design of accurate, reactive and robust control schemes suitable for a 3GPP NR cellular network. We will illustrate that the best strategy depends on the specific environment in which the nodes are deployed, and give guidelines to inform the optimal choice as a function of the system parameters.
  • The next generations of vehicles will require data transmission rates in the order of terabytes per driving hour, to support advanced automotive services. This unprecedented amount of data to be exchanged goes beyond the capabilities of existing communication technologies for vehicular communication and calls for new solutions. A possible answer to this growing demand for ultra-high transmission speeds can be found in the millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands which, however, are subject to high signal attenuation and challenging propagation characteristics. In particular, mmWave links are typically directional, to benefit from the resulting beamforming gain, and require precise alignment of the transmitter and the receiver beams, an operation which may increase the latency of the communication and lead to deafness due to beam misalignment. In this paper, we propose a stochastic model for characterizing the beam coverage and connectivity probability in mmWave automotive networks. The purpose is to exemplify some of the complex and interesting tradeoffs that have to be considered when designing solutions for vehicular scenarios based on mmWave links. The results show that the performance of the automotive nodes in highly mobile mmWave systems strictly depends on the specific environment in which the vehicles are deployed, and must account for several automotive-specific features such as the nodes speed, the beam alignment periodicity, the base stations density and the antenna geometry.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the potential of orders of magnitude increases in capacity for next-generation cellular systems. However, links in mmWave networks are susceptible to blockage and may suffer from rapid variations in quality. Connectivity to multiple cells - at mmWave and/or traditional frequencies - is considered essential for robust communication. One of the challenges in supporting multi-connectivity in mmWaves is the requirement for the network to track the direction of each link in addition to its power and timing. To address this challenge, we implement a novel uplink measurement system that, with the joint help of a local coordinator operating in the legacy band, guarantees continuous monitoring of the channel propagation conditions and allows for the design of efficient control plane applications, including handover, beam tracking and initial access. We show that an uplink-based multi-connectivity approach enables less consuming, better performing, faster and more stable cell selection and scheduling decisions with respect to a traditional downlink-based standalone scheme. Moreover, we argue that the presented framework guarantees (i) efficient tracking of the user in the presence of the channel dynamics expected at mmWaves, and (ii) fast reaction to situations in which the primary propagation path is blocked or not available.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) bands offer the possibility of orders of magnitude greater throughput for fifth generation (5G) cellular systems. However, since mmWave signals are highly susceptible to blockage, channel quality on any one mmWave link can be extremely intermittent. This paper implements a novel dual connectivity protocol that enables mobile user equipment (UE) devices to maintain physical layer connections to 4G and 5G cells simultaneously. A novel uplink control signaling system combined with a local coordinator enables rapid path switching in the event of failures on any one link. This paper provides the first comprehensive end-to-end evaluation of handover mechanisms in mmWave cellular systems. The simulation framework includes detailed measurement-based channel models to realistically capture spatial dynamics of blocking events, as well as the full details of MAC, RLC and transport protocols. Compared to conventional handover mechanisms, the study reveals significant benefits of the proposed method under several metrics.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the availability of huge bandwidths to provide unprecedented data rates to next-generation cellular mobile terminals. However, directional mmWave links are highly susceptible to rapid channel variations and suffer from severe isotropic pathloss. To face these impairments, this paper addresses the issue of tracking the channel quality of a moving user, an essential procedure for rate prediction, efficient handover and periodic monitoring and adaptation of the user's transmission configuration. The performance of an innovative tracking scheme, in which periodic refinements of the optimal steering direction are alternated to sparser refresh events, are analyzed in terms of both achievable data rate and energy consumption, and compared to those of a state-of-the-art approach. We aim at understanding in which circumstances the proposed scheme is a valid option to provide a robust and efficient mobility management solution. We show that our procedure is particularly well suited to highly variant and unstable mmWave environments.
  • In this technical report (TR), we describe the mathematical model we developed to carry out a preliminary coverage and connectivity analysis in an automotive communication scenario based on mmWave links. The purpose is to exemplify some of the complex and interesting tradeoffs that have to be considered when designing solutions for mmWave automotive scenarios.
  • The massive amounts of bandwidth available at millimeter-wave frequencies (roughly above 10 GHz) have the potential to greatly increase the capacity of fifth generation cellular wireless systems. However, to overcome the high isotropic pathloss experienced at these frequencies, high directionality will be required at both the base station and the mobile user equipment to establish sufficient link budget in wide area networks. This reliance on directionality has important implications for control layer procedures. Initial access in particular can be significantly delayed due to the need for the base station and the user to find the proper alignment for directional transmission and reception. This paper provides a survey of several recently proposed techniques for this purpose. A coverage and delay analysis is performed to compare various techniques including exhaustive and iterative search, and Context Information based algorithms. We show that the best strategy depends on the target SNR regime, and provide guidelines to characterize the optimal choice as a function of the system parameters.
  • The millimeter wave frequencies (roughly above 10 GHz) offer the availability of massive bandwidth to greatly increase the capacity of fifth generation (5G) cellular wireless systems. However, to overcome the high isotropic pathloss at these frequencies, highly directional transmissions will be required at both the base station (BS) and the mobile user equipment (UE) to establish sufficient link budget in wide area networks. This reliance on directionality has important implications for control layer procedures. Initial access in particular can be significantly delayed due to the need for the BS and the UE to find the initial directions of transmission. This paper provides a survey of several recently proposed techniques. Detection probability and delay analysis is performed to compare various techniques including exhaustive and iterative search. We show that the optimal strategy depends on the target SNR regime.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the potential of orders of magnitude increases in capacity for next-generation cellular wireless systems. However, links in mmWave networks are highly susceptible to blocking and may suffer from rapid variations in quality. Connectivity to multiple cells - both in the mmWave and in the traditional lower frequencies - is thus considered essential for robust connectivity. However, one of the challenges in supporting multi-connectivity in the mmWave space is the requirement for the network to track the direction of each link in addition to its power and timing. With highly directional beams and fast varying channels, this directional tracking may be the main bottleneck in realizing robust mmWave networks. To address this challenge, this paper proposes a novel measurement system based on (i) the UE transmitting sounding signals in directions that sweep the angular space, (ii) the mmWave cells measuring the instantaneous received signal strength along with its variance to better capture the dynamics and, consequently, the reliability of a channel/direction and, finally, (iii) a centralized controller making handover and scheduling decisions based on the mmWave cell reports and transmitting the decisions either via a mmWave cell or conventional microwave cell (when control signaling paths are not available). We argue that the proposed scheme enables efficient and highly adaptive cell selection in the presence of the channel variability expected at mmWave frequencies.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies are likely to play a significant role in fifth-generation (5G) cellular systems. A key challenge in developing systems in these bands is the potential for rapid channel dynamics: since mmWave signals are blocked by many materials, small changes in the position or orientation of the handset relative to objects in the environment can cause large swings in the channel quality. This paper addresses the issue of tracking the signal to noise ratio (SNR), which is an essential procedure for rate prediction, handover and radio link failure detection. A simple method for estimating the SNR from periodic synchronization signals is considered. The method is then evaluated using real experiments in common blockage scenarios combined with outdoor statistical models.