• Previous searches for the $\gamma$-ray signatures of annihilating galactic dark matter used predefined spatial templates to describe the background of $\gamma$-ray emission from astrophysical processes like cosmic ray interactions. In this work, we aim to establish an alternative approach, in which the astrophysical components are identified solely by their spectral and morphological properties. To this end, we adopt the recent reconstruction of the diffuse $\gamma$-ray sky from Fermi data by the D$^{3}$PO algorithm and the fact that more than 90\% of its flux can be represented by only two spectral components, resulting form the dense and dilute interstellar medium. Under these presumptions, we confirm the reported DM annihilation-like signal in the inner Galaxy and derive upper limits for dark matter annihilation cross sections. We investigate whether the DM signal could be a residual of the simplified modeling of astrophysical emission by inspecting the morphology of the regions, which favor a dark matter component. The central galactic region favors strongest for such a component with the expected spherically symmetric and radially declining profile. However, astrophysical structures, in particular sky regions which seem to host most of the dilute interstellar medium, obviously would benefit from a DM annihilation-like component as well. Although these regions do not drive the fit, they warn that a more detailed understanding of astrophysical $\gamma$-ray emitting processes in the galactic center region are necessary before definite claims about a DM annihilation signal can be made. The regions off the Galactic plane actually disfavor the best fit DM annihilation cross section from the inner Galactic region unless the radial decline of the Galactic DM density profile in the outer regions is significantly steeper than that usually assumed.
  • Predefined spatial templates to describe the background of $\gamma$-ray emission from astrophysical processes, like cosmic ray interactions, are used in previous searches for the $\gamma$-ray signatures of annihilating galactic dark matter. In this proceeding, we investigate the GeV excess in the inner Galaxy using an alternative approach, in which the astrophysical components are identified solely by their spectral and morphological properties. We confirm the reported GeV excess and derive related parameters for dark matter interpretation, which are consistent with previous results. We investigate the morphology of this spectral excess as preferred by the data only. This emission component exhibits a central Galaxy cusp as expected for a dark matter annihilation signal. However, Galactic disk regions with a morphology of that of the hot interstellar medium also host such a spectral component. This points to a possible astrophysical origin of the excess and requests a more detailed understanding of astrophysical $\gamma$-ray emitting processes in the galactic center region before definite claims about a dark matter annihilation signal can be made.
  • We analyze the 6.5yr all-sky data from the Fermi LAT restricted to gamma-ray photons with energies between 0.6-307.2GeV. Raw count maps show a superposition of diffuse and point-like emission structures and are subject to shot noise and instrumental artifacts. Using the D3PO inference algorithm, we model the observed photon counts as the sum of a diffuse and a point-like photon flux, convolved with the instrumental beam and subject to Poissonian shot noise. D3PO performs a Bayesian inference in this setting without the use of spatial or spectral templates;i.e., it removes the shot noise, deconvolves the instrumental response, and yields estimates for the two flux components separately. The non-parametric reconstruction uncovers the morphology of the diffuse photon flux up to several hundred GeV. We present an all-sky spectral index map for the diffuse component. We show that the diffuse gamma-ray flux can be described phenomenologically by only two distinct components: a soft component, presumably dominated by hadronic processes, tracing the dense, cold interstellar medium and a hard component, presumably dominated by leptonic interactions, following the hot and dilute medium and outflows such as the Fermi bubbles. A comparison of the soft component with the Galactic dust emission indicates that the dust-to-soft-gamma ratio in the interstellar medium decreases with latitude. The spectrally hard component exists in a thick Galactic disk and tends to flow out of the Galaxy at some locations. Furthermore, we find the angular power spectrum of the diffuse flux to roughly follow a power law with an index of 2.47 on large scales, independent of energy. Our first catalog of source candidates includes 3106 candidates of which we associate 1381(1897) with known sources from the 2nd(3rd) Fermi catalog. We observe gamma-ray emission in the direction of a few galaxy clusters hosting radio halos.
  • The calibration of a measurement device is crucial for every scientific experiment, where a signal has to be inferred from data. We present CURE, the calibration uncertainty renormalized estimator, to reconstruct a signal and simultaneously the instrument's calibration from the same data without knowing the exact calibration, but its covariance structure. The idea of CURE, developed in the framework of information field theory, is starting with an assumed calibration to successively include more and more portions of calibration uncertainty into the signal inference equations and to absorb the resulting corrections into renormalized signal (and calibration) solutions. Thereby, the signal inference and calibration problem turns into solving a single system of ordinary differential equations and can be identified with common resummation techniques used in field theories. We verify CURE by applying it to a simplistic toy example and compare it against existent self-calibration schemes, Wiener filter solutions, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. We conclude that the method is able to keep up in accuracy with the best self-calibration methods and serves as a non-iterative alternative to it.
  • The analysis of astronomical images is a non-trivial task. The D3PO algorithm addresses the inference problem of denoising, deconvolving, and decomposing photon observations. Its primary goal is the simultaneous but individual reconstruction of the diffuse and point-like photon flux given a single photon count image, where the fluxes are superimposed. In order to discriminate between these morphologically different signal components, a probabilistic algorithm is derived in the language of information field theory based on a hierarchical Bayesian parameter model. The signal inference exploits prior information on the spatial correlation structure of the diffuse component and the brightness distribution of the spatially uncorrelated point-like sources. A maximum a posteriori solution and a solution minimizing the Gibbs free energy of the inference problem using variational Bayesian methods are discussed. Since the derivation of the solution is not dependent on the underlying position space, the implementation of the D3PO algorithm uses the NIFTY package to ensure applicability to various spatial grids and at any resolution. The fidelity of the algorithm is validated by the analysis of simulated data, including a realistic high energy photon count image showing a 32 x 32 arcmin^2 observation with a spatial resolution of 0.1 arcmin. In all tests the D3PO algorithm successfully denoised, deconvolved, and decomposed the data into a diffuse and a point-like signal estimate for the respective photon flux components.
  • To better understand the origin and properties of cosmological magnetic fields, a detailed knowledge of magnetic fields in the large-scale structure of the Universe (galaxy clusters, filaments) is crucial. We propose a new statistical approach to study magnetic fields on large scales with the rotation measure grid data that will be obtained with the new generation of radio interferometers.
  • We introduce NIFTY, "Numerical Information Field Theory", a software package for the development of Bayesian signal inference algorithms that operate independently from any underlying spatial grid and its resolution. A large number of Bayesian and Maximum Entropy methods for 1D signal reconstruction, 2D imaging, as well as 3D tomography, appear formally similar, but one often finds individualized implementations that are neither flexible nor easily transferable. Signal inference in the framework of NIFTY can be done in an abstract way, such that algorithms, prototyped in 1D, can be applied to real world problems in higher-dimensional settings. NIFTY as a versatile library is applicable and already has been applied in 1D, 2D, 3D and spherical settings. A recent application is the D3PO algorithm targeting the non-trivial task of denoising, deconvolving, and decomposing photon observations in high energy astronomy.
  • Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore better schemes -- in sense of minimal square error -- can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that non-parametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.
  • We present an approximate calculation of the full Bayesian posterior probability distribution for the local non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{\text{nl}}$ from observations of cosmic microwave background anisotropies within the framework of information field theory. The approximation that we introduce allows us to dispense with numerically expensive sampling techniques. We use a novel posterior validation method (DIP test) in cosmology to test the precision of our method. It transfers inaccuracies of the calculated posterior into deviations from a uniform distribution for a specially constructed test quantity. For this procedure we study toy cases that use one- and two-dimensional flat skies, as well as the full spherical sky. We find that we are able to calculate the posterior precisely under a flat-sky approximation, albeit not in the spherical case. We argue that this is most likely due to an insufficient precision of the used numerical implementation of the spherical harmonic transform, which might affect other non-Gaussianity estimators as well. Furthermore, we present how a nonlinear reconstruction of the primordial gravitational potential on the full spherical sky can be obtained in principle. Using the flat-sky approximation, we find deviations for the posterior of $f_{\text{nl}}$ from a Gaussian shape that become more significant for larger values of the underlying true $f_{\text{nl}}$. We also perform a comparison to the well-known estimator of Komatsu et al. [Astrophys. J. 634, 14 (2005)] and finally derive the posterior for the local non-Gaussianity parameter $g_{\text{nl}}$ as an example of how to extend the introduced formalism to higher orders of non-Gaussianity.
  • NIFTY, "Numerical Information Field Theory", is a software package designed to enable the development of signal inference algorithms that operate regardless of the underlying spatial grid and its resolution. Its object-oriented framework is written in Python, although it accesses libraries written in Cython, C++, and C for efficiency. NIFTY offers a toolkit that abstracts discretized representations of continuous spaces, fields in these spaces, and operators acting on fields into classes. Thereby, the correct normalization of operations on fields is taken care of automatically without concerning the user. This allows for an abstract formulation and programming of inference algorithms, including those derived within information field theory. Thus, NIFTY permits its user to rapidly prototype algorithms in 1D, and then apply the developed code in higher-dimensional settings of real world problems. The set of spaces on which NIFTY operates comprises point sets, n-dimensional regular grids, spherical spaces, their harmonic counterparts, and product spaces constructed as combinations of those. The functionality and diversity of the package is demonstrated by a Wiener filter code example that successfully runs without modification regardless of the space on which the inference problem is defined.
  • We develop a method to infer log-normal random fields from measurement data affected by Gaussian noise. The log-normal model is well suited to describe strictly positive signals with fluctuations whose amplitude varies over several orders of magnitude. We use the formalism of minimum Gibbs free energy to derive an algorithm that uses the signal's correlation structure to regularize the reconstruction. The correlation structure, described by the signal's power spectrum, is thereby reconstructed from the same data set. We show that the minimization of the Gibbs free energy, corresponding to a Gaussian approximation to the posterior marginalized over the power spectrum, is equivalent to the empirical Bayes ansatz, in which the power spectrum is fixed to its maximum a posteriori value. We further introduce a prior for the power spectrum that enforces spectral smoothness. The appropriateness of this prior in different scenarios is discussed and its effects on the reconstruction's results are demonstrated. We validate the performance of our reconstruction algorithm in a series of one- and two-dimensional test cases with varying degrees of non-linearity and different noise levels.
  • The simulation of complex stochastic network dynamics arising, for instance, from models of coupled biomolecular processes remains computationally challenging. Often, the necessity to scan a models' dynamics over a large parameter space renders full-fledged stochastic simulations impractical, motivating approximation schemes. Here we propose an approximation scheme which improves upon the standard linear noise approximation while retaining similar computational complexity. The underlying idea is to minimize, at each time step, the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true time evolved probability distribution and a Gaussian approximation (entropic matching). This condition leads to ordinary differential equations for the mean and the covariance matrix of the Gaussian. For cases of weak nonlinearity, the method is more accurate than the linear method when both are compared to stochastic simulations.
  • Estimating the diagonal entries of a matrix, that is not directly accessible but only available as a linear operator in the form of a computer routine, is a common necessity in many computational applications, especially in image reconstruction and statistical inference. Here, methods of statistical inference are used to improve the accuracy or the computational costs of matrix probing methods to estimate matrix diagonals. In particular, the generalized Wiener filter methodology, as developed within information field theory, is shown to significantly improve estimates based on only a few sampling probes, in cases in which some form of continuity of the solution can be assumed. The strength, length scale, and precise functional form of the exploited autocorrelation function of the matrix diagonal is determined from the probes themselves. The developed algorithm is successfully applied to mock and real world problems. These performance tests show that, in situations where a matrix diagonal has to be calculated from only a small number of computationally expensive probes, a speedup by a factor of 2 to 10 is possible with the proposed method.