• We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • We present HoloFace, an open-source framework for face alignment, head pose estimation and facial attribute retrieval for Microsoft HoloLens. HoloFace implements two state-of-the-art face alignment methods which can be used interchangeably: one running locally and one running on a remote backend. Head pose estimation is accomplished by fitting a deformable 3D model to the landmarks localized using face alignment. The head pose provides both the rotation of the head and a position in the world space. The parameters of the fitted 3D face model provide estimates of facial attributes such as mouth opening or smile. Together the above information can be used to augment the faces of people seen by the HoloLens user, and thus their interaction. Potential usage scenarios include facial recognition, emotion recognition, eye gaze tracking and many others. We demonstrate the capabilities of our framework by augmenting the faces of people seen through the HoloLens with various objects and animations.
  • In this paper, we propose Deep Alignment Network (DAN), a robust face alignment method based on a deep neural network architecture. DAN consists of multiple stages, where each stage improves the locations of the facial landmarks estimated by the previous stage. Our method uses entire face images at all stages, contrary to the recently proposed face alignment methods that rely on local patches. This is possible thanks to the use of landmark heatmaps which provide visual information about landmark locations estimated at the previous stages of the algorithm. The use of entire face images rather than patches allows DAN to handle face images with large variation in head pose and difficult initializations. An extensive evaluation on two publicly available datasets shows that DAN reduces the state-of-the-art failure rate by up to 70%. Our method has also been submitted for evaluation as part of the Menpo challenge.
  • We systematically study the allowed parameter space for the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos measured at Earth, including beyond the Standard Model theories at production, during propagation, and at detection. One motivation is to illustrate the discrimination power of the next-generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2. We identify several examples that lead to potential deviations from the standard neutrino mixing expectation such as significant sterile neutrino production at the source, effective operators modifying the neutrino propagation at high energies, dark matter interactions in neutrino propagation, or non-standard interactions in Earth matter. IceCube-Gen2 can exclude about 90% of the allowed parameter space in these cases, and hence will allow to efficiently test and discriminate models. More detailed information can be obtained from additional observables such as the energy-dependence of the effect, fraction of electron antineutrinos at the Glashow resonance, or number of tau neutrino events.
  • In this work we present a face alignment pipeline based on two novel methods: weighted splitting for K-cluster Regression Forests and 3D Affine Pose Regression for face shape initialization. Our face alignment method is based on the Local Binary Feature framework, where instead of standard regression forests and pixel difference features used in the original method, we use our K-cluster Regression Forests with Weighted Splitting (KRFWS) and Pyramid HOG features. We also use KRFWS to perform Affine Pose Regression (APR) and 3D-Affine Pose Regression (3D-APR), which intend to improve the face shape initialization. APR applies a rigid 2D transform to the initial face shape that compensates for inaccuracy in the initial face location, size and in-plane rotation. 3D-APR estimates the parameters of a 3D transform that additionally compensates for out-of-plane rotation. The resulting pipeline, consisting of APR and 3D-APR followed by face alignment, shows an improvement of 20% over standard LBF on the challenging IBUG dataset, and state-of-theart accuracy on the entire 300-W dataset.
  • We give a brief update on the search for Hidden Photon Dark Matter with FUNK. The experiment uses a large spherical mirror, which, if Hidden Photon Dark Matter exists in the accessible mass and coupling parameter range, would yield an optical signal in the mirror's center in an otherwise dark environment. After a test run with a CCD, preparations for a run with a low-noise PMT are under way and described in this proceedings.
  • With the recent discovery of high-energy neutrinos of extra-terrestrial origin by the IceCube neutrino observatory, neutrino-astronomy is entering a new era. This review will cover currently operating open water/ice neutrino telescopes, the latest evidence for a flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos and current efforts in the search for steady and transient neutrino point sources. Generalised constraints on potential astrophysical sources are presented, allowing to focus the hunt for the sources of the observed high-energy neutrinos.
  • Observational cosmology employing optical surveys often require precise flux calibration. In this context we present SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. SCALA consists of a hexagonal array of 18 small parabolic mirrors distributed over the face of, and feeding parallel light to, the telescope entrance pupil. The mirrors are illuminated by integrating spheres and a wavelength-tunable (from UV to IR) light source, generating light beams with opening angles of 1 degree. These nearly parallel beams are flat and flux-calibrated at a subpercent level, enabling us to calibrate our "telescope + SNIFS system" at the required precision.
  • If Dark Matter is composed of hidden-sector photons that kinetically mix with photons of the visible sector, then Dark Matter has a tiny oscillating electric field component. Its presence would lead to a small amount of visible radiation being emitted from a conducting surface, with the photon frequency given approximately by the mass of the hidden photon. Here, we report on experimental efforts that have started recently to search for such hidden photon Dark Matter in the (sub-)eV regime with a prototype mirror for the Auger fluorescence detector at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.
  • Building on the technological success of the IceCube neutrino telescope, we outline a prospective low-energy extension that utilizes the clear ice of the South Pole. Aiming at a 10 Mton effective volume and a 10 MeV threshold, the detector would provide sufficient sensitivity to detect neutrino bursts from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in nearby galaxies. The detector geometry and required density of instrumentation are discussed along with the requirements to control the various sources of background, such as solar neutrinos. In particular, the suppression of spallation events induced by atmospheric muons poses a challenge that will need to be addressed. Assuming this background can be controlled, we find that the resulting detector will be able to detect SNe from beyond 10 Mpc, delivering between 10 and 41 regular core-collapse SN detections per decade. It would further allow to study more speculative phenomena, such as optically dark (failed) SNe, where the collapse proceeds directly to a black hole, at a detection rate similar to that of regular SNe. We find that the biggest technological challenge lies in the required number of large area photo-sensors, with simultaneous strict limits on the allowed noise rates. If both can be realized, the detector concept we present will reach the required sensitivity with a comparatively small construction effort and hence offers a route to future routine observations of SNe with neutrinos.
  • Large-scale underground water-Cherenkov neutrino observatories rely on single photon sensors whose sensitive area for Cherenkov photons one wants to maximise. Low dark noise rates and dense module spacing will thereby allow to substantially decrease the energy threshold in future projects. We describe a feasibility study of a novel type of single photon sensor that employs organic wavelength-shifting material (WLS) to capture Cherenkov photons and guide them to a PMT readout. Different WLS materials have been tested in lab measurements as candidates for use in such a sensor and photon capture efficiencies as high as 50 % have been achieved. Based on these findings we estimate that the effective photosensitive area of a prototype built with existing technology can easily exceed that of modules currently used e. g. in IceCube. Additionally, the dark noise rate of such a module can be exceptionally low in the order of 10 Hz. This is of special importance when targeting low-energy neutrinos that yield only few photons that need to be distinguished from noise hits.
  • As an increasing number of well measured type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) become available, the statistical uncertainty on w has been reduced to the same size as the systematic uncertainty. The statistical error will decrease further in the near future, and hence the improvement of systematic uncertainties needs to be addressed, if further progress is to be made. We study how uncertainties in the primary reference spectrum - which are a main contribution to the systematic uncertainty budget - affect the measurement of the Dark Energy equation of state parameter w from SNe Ia. The increasing number of SN observations can be used to reduce the uncertainties by including perturbations of the reference spectrum as nuisance parameters in a cosmology fit, thus "self-calibrating" the Hubble diagram. We employ this method to real SNe data for the first time and find the perturbations of the reference spectrum consistent with zero at the 1%-level. For future surveys we estimate that ~3500 SNe will be required for our method to outperform the standard method of deriving the cosmological parameters.
  • A novel method is presented which will enhance the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to identify transient sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and core-collapse Supernovae (SNe). Triggered by the detection of high energy neutrino events from IceCube or other large scale neutrino telescopes, an optical follow-up program will allow the identification of the transient neutrino source. We show that once the follow-up program is implemented, the achievable sensitivity of IceCube to neutrinos from SNe and GRBs would increase by a factor of 2-3. The program can be realized with a small network of automated 1-2 meter telescopes and has rather modest observing time requirements.
  • We examine the utility of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and systematic uncertainty control. Next generation space surveys such as the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will obtain thousands of supernovae at z>1.7, beyond the design redshift for which the supernovae will be exquisitely characterized. We find that any z\gtrsim2 standard candles' use for cosmological parameter estimation is quite modest and subject to pitfalls; we examine gravitational lensing, redshift calibration, and contamination effects in some detail. The very high redshift supernovae - both thermonuclear and core collapse - will provide copious interesting information on star formation, environment, and evolution. However, the new observational systematics that must be faced, as well as the limited expansion of SN-parameter space afforded, does not point to high value for 1.7<z<3 SNe Ia in controlling evolutionary systematics relative to what SNAP can already achieve at z<1.7. Synergy with observations from JWST and thirty meter class telescopes afford rich opportunities for advances throughout astrophysics.
  • In this paper the sensitivity of a future kilometer-sized neutrino detector to detect and measure the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos is evaluated. Event rates in established detection channels, such as muon events from charged current muon neutrino interactions or cascade events from electron neutrino and tau neutrino interactions, are calculated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Neutrino fluxes as expected from prompt charm decay in the atmosphere or from astrophysical sources such as Active Galactic Nuclei are modeled assuming power laws. The ability to measure the normalization and slope of these spectra is then analyzed. It is found that the cascade channel generally has a high sensitivity for the detection and characterization of the diffuse flux, when compared to what is expected for the upgoing- and downgoing-muon channels. A flux at the level of the Waxman-Bahcall upper bound should be detectable in all channels separately while a combination of the information of the different channels will allow detection of a flux more than one order of magnitude lower. Neutrinos from the prompt decay of charmed mesons in the atmosphere should be detectable in future measurements for all but the lowest predictions.
  • We present the high energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The aim of the program is to provide a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA and ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specific flux, propagates them through the Earth and in a final step simulates neutrino interactions within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strength and limitations of the program, and provide as an example event rates for atmospheric and E^-2 neutrino spectra.