• We discuss the progress in integration of nanodiamonds with photonic devices for quantum optics applications. Experimental results in GaP, SiO2 and SiC-nanodiamond platforms show that various regimes of light and matter interaction can be achieved by engineering color center systems through hybrid approaches. We present our recent results on the growth of color center-rich nanodiamond on prefabricated 3C-SiC microdisk resonators. These hybrid devices achieve up to five-fold enhancement of diamond color center light emission and can be employed for integrated quantum photonics.
  • We demonstrate cavity-enhanced Raman emission from a single atomic defect in a solid. Our platform is a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond coupled with a monolithic diamond photonic crystal cavity. The cavity enables an unprecedented frequency tuning range of the Raman emission (100 GHz) that significantly exceeds the spectral inhomogeneity of silicon-vacancy centers in diamond nanostructures. We also show that the cavity selectively suppresses the phonon-induced spontaneous emission that degrades the efficiency of Raman photon generation. Our results pave the way towards photon-mediated many-body interactions between solid-state quantum emitters in a nanophotonic platform.
  • The controlled generation and manipulation of atom-like defects in solids has a wide range of applications in quantum technology. Although various defect centres have displayed promise as either quantum sensors, single photon emitters or light-matter interfaces, the search for an ideal defect with multi-functional ability remains open. In this spirit, we investigate here the optical and spin properties of the V1 defect centre, one of the silicon vacancy defects in the 4H polytype of silicon carbide (SiC). The V1 centre in 4H-SiC features two well-distinguishable sharp optical transitions and a unique S=3/2 electronic spin, which holds promise to implement a robust spin-photon interface. Here, we investigate the V1 defect at low temperatures using optical excitation and magnetic resonance techniques. The measurements, which are performed on ensemble, as well as on single centres, prove that this centre combines coherent optical emission, with up to 40% of the radiation emitted into the zero-phonon line (ZPL), a strong optical spin signal and long spin coherence time. These results single out the V1 defect in SiC as a promising system for spin-based quantum technologies.
  • We develop a thermally tunable hybrid photonic platform comprising gallium arsenide (GaAs) photonic crystal cavities, silicon nitride (SiN$_x$) grating couplers and waveguides, and chromium (Cr) microheaters on an integrated photonic chip. The GaAs photonic crystal cavities are evanescently connected to a common bus waveguide, separating the computation and communication layers. The microheaters are designed to continuously and reversibly tune distant photonic crystal cavities to a common resonance. This architecture can be implemented in a coherent optical network for dedicated optical computing and machine learning.
  • Quantum emitters are an integral component for a broad range of quantum technologies including quantum communication, quantum repeaters, and linear optical quantum computation. Solid-state color centers are promising candidates for scalable quantum optics due to their long coherence time and small inhomogeneous broadening. However, once excited, color centers often decay through phonon-assisted processes, limiting the efficiency of single photon generation and photon mediated entanglement generation. Herein, we demonstrate strong enhancement of spontaneous emission rate of a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond embedded within a monolithic optical cavity, reaching a regime where the excited state lifetime is dominated by spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We observe 10-fold lifetime reduction and 42-fold enhancement in emission intensity when the cavity is tuned into resonance with the optical transition of a single silicon-vacancy center, corresponding to 90% of the excited state energy decay occurring through spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We also demonstrate the largest to date coupling strength ($g/2\pi=4.9\pm0.3 GHz$) and cooperativity ($C=1.4$) for color-center-based cavity quantum electrodynamics systems, bringing the system closer to the strong coupling regime.
  • In this chapter, we present the state-of-the-art in the generation of nonclassical states of light using semiconductor cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) platforms. Our focus is on the photon blockade effects that enable the generation of indistinguishable photon streams with high purity and efficiency. Starting with the leading platform of InGaAs quantum dots in optical nanocavities, we review the physics of a single quantum emitter strongly coupled to a cavity. Furthermore, we propose a complete model for photon blockade and tunneling in III-V quantum dot cavity QED systems. Turning toward quantum emitters with small inhomogeneous broadening, we propose a direction for novel experiments for nonclassical light generation based on group-IV color-center systems. We present a model of a multi-emitter cavity QED platform, which features richer dressed-states ladder structures, and show how it can offer opportunities for studying new regimes of high-quality photon blockade.
  • The photon blockade (PB) effect in emitter-cavity systems depends on the anharmonicity of the ladder of dressed energy eigenstates. The recent developments in color center photonics are leading toward experimental demonstrations of multi-emitter-cavity solid-state systems with an expanded set of energy levels compared to the traditionally studied single-emitter systems. We focus on the case of N = 2 nonidentical quasi-atoms strongly coupled to a nanocavity in the bad cavity regime (with parameters within reach of the color center systems), and discover three PB mechanisms: polaritonic, subradiant and unconventional. The polaritonic PB, which is the conventional mechanism studied in single-emitter-cavity systems, also occurs at the polariton frequencies in multi-emitter systems. The subradiant PB is a new interference effect owing to the inhomogeneous broadening of the emitters which results in a purer and a more robust single photon emission than the polaritonic PB. The unconventional PB in the modeled system corresponds to the suppression of the single- and two-photon correlation statistics and the enhancement of the three-photon correlation statistic. Using the effective Hamiltonian approach, we unravel the origin and the time-domain evolution of these phenomena.
  • Silicon carbide is a promising platform for single photon sources, quantum bits (qubits) and nanoscale sensors based on individual color centers. Towards this goal, we develop a scalable array of nanopillars incorporating single silicon vacancy centers in 4H-SiC, readily available for efficient interfacing with free-space objective and lensed-fibers. A commercially obtained substrate is irradiated with 2 MeV electron beams to create vacancies. Subsequent lithographic process forms 800 nm tall nanopillars with 400-1,400 nm diameters. We obtain high collection efficiency, up to 22 kcounts/s optical saturation rates from a single silicon vacancy center, while preserving the single photon emission and the optically induced electron-spin polarization properties. Our study demonstrates silicon carbide as a readily available platform for scalable quantum photonics architecture relying on single photon sources and qubits.
  • Arrays of identical and individually addressable qubits lay the foundation for the creation of scalable quantum hardware such as quantum processors and repeaters. Silicon vacancy centers in diamond (SiV) offer excellent physical properties such as low inhomogeneous broadening, fast photon emission, and a large Debye-Waller factor, while the possibility for all-optical ultrafast manipulation and techniques to extend the spin coherence times make them very promising candidates for qubits. Here, we have developed arrays of nanopillars containing single SiV centers with high yield, and we demonstrate ultrafast all-optical complete coherent control of the state of a single SiV center. The high quality of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown SiV centers provides excellent spectral stability, which allows us to coherently manipulate and quasi-resonantly read out the state of individual SiV centers on picosecond timescales using ultrafast optical pulses. This work opens new opportunities towards the creation of a scalable on-chip diamond platform for quantum information processing and scalable nanophotonics applications.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV$^-$) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid SiC/diamond structures are realized by combining the growth of nanoand micro-diamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV$^-$ color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ionimplantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV$^-$ on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV$^-$ centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV$^-$ lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow linewidths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV$^-$ lines from all-diamond nano-pillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV$^-$ centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.
  • We present the design, fabrication and characterization of cubic (3C) silicon carbide microdisk resonators with high quality factor modes at visible and near infrared wavelengths (600 - 950 nm). Whispering gallery modes with quality factors as high as 2,300 and corresponding mode volumes V ~ 2 ({\lambda}/n)^3 are measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy at room temperature. We obtain excellent correspondence between transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarized resonances simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and those observed in experiment. These structures based on ensembles of optically active impurities in 3C-SiC resonators could play an important role in diverse applications of nonlinear and quantum photonics, including low power optical switching and quantum memories.
  • We demonstrate the design, fabrication and characterization of nanobeam cavities with multiple higher order modes. Designs with two high Q modes with frequency separations of an octave are introduced, and we fabricate such cavities exhibiting resonances with wavelength separations of up to 740 nm.
  • We demonstrate second harmonic generation in photonic crystal cavities in (001) and (111)B oriented GaAs. The fundamental resonance is at 1800 nm, leading to second harmonic below the GaAs bandgap. Below-bandgap operation minimizes absorption of the second harmonic and two photon absorption of the pump. Photonic crystal cavities were fabricated in both orientations at various in-plane rotations of the GaAs substrate. The rotation dependence and farfield patterns of the second harmonic match simulation. We observe similar maximum efficiencies of 1.2 %/W in (001) and (111)B oriented GaAs.
  • We demonstrate second harmonic generation at telecommunications wavelengths in L3 photonic crystal cavities in (111)-oriented GaAs. The second harmonic power from photonic crystal cavities fabricated in (111)-oriented GaAs is significantly increased compared to those fabricated in conventional (001)-oriented GaAs.
  • We demonstrate the design, fabrication and characterization of nanobeam photonic crystal cavities in (111)-GaAs with multiple high quality factor modes, with large frequency separations (up to 740 nm in experiment, i.e., a factor of 1.5 and up to an octave in theory). Such structures are crucial for efficient implementation of nonlinear frequency conversion. Here, we employ them to demonstrate sum frequency generation from 1300 nm and 1950 nm to 780 nm. These wavelengths are particularly interesting for quantum frequency conversion between Si vacancy centers in diamond and the fiber optic network.
  • We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities from cubic (3C) thin films (thickness ~ 200 nm) of silicon carbide (SiC) grown epitaxially on a silicon substrate. We demonstrate cavity resonances across the telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1,250 - 1,600 nm. Finally, we discuss possible applications in nonlinear optics, optical interconnects, and quantum information science.