• We propose the Cosmic Web Detachment (CWD) model, a framework to interpret the star-formation history of galaxies in a cosmological context. The CWD model unifies several starvation mechanisms known to disrupt or stop star formation into one single physical framework. Galaxies begin accreting star-forming gas at early times via a network of primordial filaments, simply related to the pattern of density fluctuations in the initial conditions. But when shell-crossing occurs on intergalactic scales, this pattern is disrupted, and the galaxy detaches from its primordial filaments, ending the accretion of cold gas. We argue that CWD encompasses known external processes halting star formation, such as harassment, strangulation and starvation. On top of these external processes, internal feedback processes such as AGN contribute to stop in star formation as well. By explicitly pointing out the non-linear nature of CWD events we introduce a simple formalism to identify CWD events in N-body simulations. With it we reproduce and explain, in the context of CWD, several observations including downsizing, the cosmic star formation rate history, the galaxy mass-color diagram and the dependence of the fraction of red galaxies with mass and local density.
  • The most common statistic used to analyze large-scale structure surveys is the correlation function, or power spectrum. Here, we show how `slicing' the correlation function on local density brings sensitivity to interesting non-Gaussian features in the large-scale structure, such as the expansion or contraction of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) according to the local density. The sliced correlation function measures the large-scale flows that smear out the BAO, instead of just correcting them as reconstruction algorithms do. Thus, we expect the sliced correlation function to be useful in constraining the growth factor, and modified gravity theories that involve the local density. Out of the studied cases, we find that the run of the BAO peak location with density is best revealed when slicing on a $\sim 40$ Mpc/$h$ filtered density. But slicing on a $\sim100$ Mpc/$h$ filtered density may be most useful in distinguishing between underdense and overdense regions, whose BAO peaks are separated by a substantial $\sim 5$ Mpc/$h$ at $z=0$. We also introduce `curtain plots' showing how local densities drive particle motions toward or away from each other over the course of an $N$-body simulation.
  • For over twenty years, the term 'cosmic web' has guided our understanding of the large-scale arrangement of matter in the cosmos, accurately evoking the concept of a network of galaxies linked by filaments. But the physical correspondence between the cosmic web and structural-engineering or textile 'spiderwebs' is even deeper than previously known, and extends to origami tessellations as well. Here we explain that in a good structure-formation approximation known as the adhesion model, threads of the cosmic web form a spiderweb, i.e. can be strung up to be entirely in tension. The correspondence is exact if nodes sampling voids are included, and if structure is excluded within collapsed regions (walls, filaments and haloes), where dark-matter multistreaming and baryonic physics affect the structure. We also suggest how concepts arising from this link might be used to test cosmological models: for example, to test for large-scale anisotropy and rotational flows in the cosmos.
  • We apply the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to the stacked voids identified using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We also use 1000 mock galaxy catalogs that match the geometry, density, and clustering properties of the BOSS sample in order to characterize the statistical uncertainties of our measurements and take into account systematic errors such as redshift space distortions. For both BOSS data and mock catalogs, we use the ZOBOV algorithm to identify voids, we stack together all voids with effective radii of 30-100Mpc/h in the redshift range 0.43-0.7, and we accurately measure the shape of the stacked voids. Our tests with the mock catalogs show that we measure the stacked void ellipticity with a statistical precision of 2.6%. We find that the stacked voids in redshift space are slightly squashed along the line of sight, which is consistent with previous studies. We repeat this measurement of stacked void shape in the BOSS data assuming several values of Omega_m within the flat LCDM model, and we compare to the mock catalogs in redshift space in order to perform the AP test. We obtain a constraint of $\Omega_m = 0.38^{+0.18}_{-0.15}$ at the 68% confidence level from the AP test. We discuss the various sources of statistical and systematic noise that affect the constraining power of this method. In particular, we find that the measured ellipticity of stacked voids scales more weakly with cosmology than the standard AP prediction, leading to significantly weaker constraints. We discuss how AP constraints will improve in future surveys with larger volumes and densities.
  • We discuss an idealized model of halo formation, in which a collapsing halo node is tetrahedral, with a filament extruding from each of its four faces, and with a wall connecting each pair of filaments. In the model, filaments generally spin when they form, and the halo spins if and only if there is some rotation in filaments. This is the simplest-possible fully three-dimensional halo collapse in the 'origami approximation,' in which voids are irrotational, and the dark-matter sheet out of which dark-matter structures form is allowed to fold in position-velocity phase space, but not stretch (i.e., it cannot vary in density along a stream). Up to an overall scaling, the four filament directions, and only three other quantities, such as filament spins, suffice to determine all of the collapse's properties: the shape, mass, and spin of the halo; the densities per unit length and spins of all filaments; and masses per unit area of the walls. If the filaments are arranged regular-tetrahedrally, filament properties obey simple laws, reminiscent of angular-momentum conservation. The model may be most useful in understanding spin correlations between neighboring galaxies joined by filaments; these correlations would give intrinsic alignments between galaxies, essential to understand for accurate cosmological weak-lensing measurements.
  • We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the galaxy catalog. We identify a total of 10,643 voids. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we obtain 1,228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20-100Mpc/h and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We release versions of the catalogs both with and without quality cuts. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stellar mass distribution of galaxies living inside and outside of the voids, and find no significant difference. These BOSS and mock void catalogs are useful for a number of cosmological and galaxy environment studies.
  • Here we present a simple, parameter-free, non-perturbative algorithm that gives low-redshift cosmological particle realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales, called MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution). It has virtually the same cost as producing N-body-simulation initial conditions, since it works with the 'stretch' parameter {\psi}, the Lagrangian divergence of the displacement field. It promises to be useful in quickly producing mock catalogs, and to simplify computationally intensive reconstructions of galaxy surveys. MUSCLE applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and 2LPT), and, by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme. Slight further improvement is possible by mixing in the 2LPT estimate on large scales. Additionally, we show the behavior of {\psi} for different morphologies (voids, walls, filaments, and haloes). A Python code to produce these realizations is available at http://skysrv.pha.jhu.edu/~neyrinck/muscle.html.
  • In the current cosmological paradigm, an initially flat three-dimensional manifold that pervades space (the `dark-matter sheet') folds up to build concentrations of mass (galaxies), and a cosmic web between them. Galaxies are nodes, connected by a network of filaments and walls. The folding is in six-dimensional (3D position, plus 3D velocity) phase space. The positions of creases, or caustics, mark the edges of structures. Here, I introduce an origami approximation to cosmological structure formation, in which the dark-matter sheet is not allowed to stretch. But it still produces an idealized cosmic web, with nodes, filaments, walls and voids. In 2D, nodes form in `polygonal collapse' (a twist-fold in origami), necessarily generating filaments simultaneously. In 3D, nodes form in `polyhedral collapse,' simultaneously generating filaments and walls. The masses, spatial arrangement, and angular momenta of nodes and filaments are related in the model. I describe some `tetrahedral collapse', or tetrahedral twist-fold, models.
  • We discuss the Kolmogorov complexity of primordial patches that collapse to form galaxies like the Milky Way; this complexity quantifies the amount of initial data available to form the structure. We also speculate on how the quantity changes with time. Because of dark-matter and baryonic collapse processes, it likely decreases with time, i.e.\ information sinks dominate sources. But sources of new random information do exist; e.g., a central black hole with an accretion disk and jets could in principle broadcast small-scale quantum fluctuations over a substantial portion of a galaxy. A speculative example of how this concept might be useful is in differentiating between warm (WDM) and cold (CDM) dark matter. With WDM, the initial patch that formed the Milky Way would have had few features, making the present high degree of structure a curiosity. The primordial patch would have had only several billion independent information-carrying `pixels' if the WDM particle had a mass of 1 keV. This number of `pixels' is much less than even the number of stars in the Milky Way. If the dark matter is proven to be warm, the high degree of structure in the Milky Way could have arisen in two ways: (1) from a high sensitivity to initial conditions, like an intricate fractal arising from a relatively simple computer code; or (2) from random information generated after the galaxy formed, i.e.\ not entirely deterministically from the initial conditions.
  • Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic "sub-web" inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In $N$-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the ZOBOV algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the ORIGAMI algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases (i.e., particle mass decreases), void density minima grow shallower, while void edges change little. Also, the number of subvoids decreases. The density field in voids is particularly insensitive to baryonic physics, so if void density profiles and minima could be measured observationally, they would offer a valuable probe of the nature of dark matter. Furthermore, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the substructures in between have been smoothed out; this leads to a clear, mid-range peak in the density PDF.
  • We study the nature of voids defined as single-stream regions that have not undergone shell-crossing. We use ORIGAMI to determine the cosmic web morphology of each dark matter particle in a suite of cosmological $N$-body simulations, which explicitly calculates whether a particle has crossed paths with others along multiple sets of axes and does not depend on a parameter or smoothing scale. The theoretical picture of voids is that of expanding underdensities with borders defined by shell-crossing. We find instead that locally underdense single-stream regions are not bounded on all sides by multi-stream regions, thus they percolate, filling the simulation volume; we show that the set of multi-stream particles also percolates. This percolation persists to high resolution, where the mass fraction of single-stream voids is low, because the volume fraction remains high; we speculate on the fraction of collapsed mass in the continuum limit of infinite resolution. By introducing a volume threshold parameter to define underdense void "cores", we create a catalog of ORIGAMI voids which consist entirely of single-stream particles and measure their percolation properties, volume functions, and average densities.
  • The powerful Lagrangian view of structure formation was essentially introduced to cosmology by Zel'dovich. In the current cosmological paradigm, a dark-matter-sheet 3D manifold, inhabiting 6D position-velocity phase space, was flat (with vanishing velocity) at the big bang. Afterward, gravity stretched and bunched the sheet together in different places, forming a cosmic web when projected to the position coordinates. Here, I explain some properties of an origami approximation, in which the sheet does not stretch or contract (an assumption that is false in general), but is allowed to fold. Even without stretching, the sheet can form an idealized cosmic web, with convex polyhedral voids separated by straight walls and filaments, joined by convex polyhedral nodes. The nodes form in 'polygonal' or 'polyhedral' collapse, somewhat like spherical/ellipsoidal collapse, except incorporating simultaneous filament and wall formation. The origami approximation allows phase-space geometries of nodes, filaments, and walls to be more easily understood, and may aid in understanding spin correlations between nearby galaxies. This contribution explores kinematic origami-approximation models giving velocity fields for the first time.
  • The star formation history of galaxies is a complex process usually considered to be stochastic in nature, for which we can only give average descriptions such as the color-density relation. In this work we follow star-forming gas particles in a hydrodynamical N-body simulation back in time in order to study their initial spatial configuration. By keeping record of the time when a gas particle started forming stars we can produce gas-star isochrone surfaces delineating the surfaces of accreting gas that begin producing stars at different times. These accretion surfaces are closely packed inside dense regions, intersecting each other, and as a result galaxies inside proto-clusters stop accreting gas early, naturally explaining the color dependence on density. The process described here has a purely gravitational / geometrical origin, arguably operating at a more fundamental level than complex processes such as AGN and supernovae, and providing a conceptual origin for the color-density relation.
  • As an alternative way of describing the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, proves to be very useful in understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell-crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with cosmic web structure, because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell-crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell-crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of these phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariants space.
  • Gaussianizing transformations are used statistically in many non-cosmological fields, but in cosmology, we are only starting to apply them. Here I explain a strategy of analyzing the 1-point function (PDF) of a spatial field, together with the 'essential' clustering statistics of the Gaussianized field, which are invariant to a local transformation. In cosmology, if the tracer sampling is sufficient, this achieves two important goals. First, it can greatly multiply the Fisher information, which is negligible on nonlinear scales in the usual $\delta$ statistics. Second, it decouples clustering statistics from a local bias description for tracers such as galaxies.
  • We study the relationship between dark-matter haloes and matter in the MIP $N$-body simulation ensemble, which allows precision measurements of this relationship, even deeply into voids. What enables this is a lack of discreteness, stochasticity, and exclusion, achieved by averaging over hundreds of possible sets of initial small-scale modes, while holding fixed large-scale modes that give the cosmic web. We find (i) that dark-matter-halo formation is greatly suppressed in voids; there is an exponential downturn at low densities in the otherwise power-law matter-to-halo density bias function. Thus, the rarity of haloes in voids is akin to the rarity of the largest clusters, and their abundance is quite sensitive to cosmological parameters. The exponential downturn appears both in an excursion-set model, and in a model in which fluctuations evolve in voids as in an open universe with an effective $\Omega_m$ proportional to a large-scale density. We also find that (ii) haloes typically populate the average halo-density field in a super-Poisson way, i.e. with a variance exceeding the mean; and (iii) the rank-order-Gaussianized halo and dark-matter fields are impressively similar in Fourier space. We compare both their power spectra and cross-correlation, supporting the conclusion that one is roughly a strictly-increasing mapping of the other. The MIP ensemble especially reveals how halo abundance varies with `environmental' quantities beyond the local matter density; (iv) we find a visual suggestion that at fixed matter density, filaments are more populated by haloes than clusters.
  • Structures like galaxies and filaments of galaxies in the Universe come about from the origami-like folding of an initially flat three-dimensional manifold in 6D phase space. The ORIGAMI method identifies these structures in a cosmological simulation, delineating the structures according to their outer folds. Structure identification is a crucial step in comparing cosmological simulations to observed maps of the Universe. The ORIGAMI definition is objective, dynamical and geometric: filament, wall and void particles are classified according to the number of orthogonal axes along which dark-matter streams have crossed. Here, we briefly review these ideas, and speculate on how ORIGAMI might be useful to find cosmic voids.
  • We present an experiment in which we 'ring' a set of cosmological N-body-simulation initial conditions, placing spikes in the initial power spectrum at different wavenumber bins. We then measure where these spikes end up in the final conditions. In the usual overdensity power spectrum, most sensitive to contracting and collapsing dense regions, initial power on slightly non-linear scales (k ~ 0.3 h/Mpc) smears to smaller scales, coming to dominate the initial power once there. Log-density and Gaussianized-density power spectra, sensitive to low-density (expanding) and high-density regions, respond differently: initial spikes spread symmetrically in scale, both upward and downward. In fact, in the power spectrum of 1/(1 + {\delta}), spikes migrate to larger scales, showing the magnifying effect of voids on small-scale modes. These power spectra show much greater sensitivity to small-scale initial features. We also test the difference between an approximation of the Ly-{\alpha} flux field, and its Gaussianized form, and give a toy model that qualitatively explains the symmetric power spreading in Gaussianized-density power spectra. Also, we discuss how to use this framework to estimate power-spectrum covariance matrices. This can be used to track the fate of information in the Universe, that takes the form of initial degrees of freedom, one random spike per initial mode.
  • Large-scale bulk flows in the Universe distort the initial density field, broadening the baryon-acoustic-oscillation (BAO) feature that was imprinted when baryons were strongly coupled to photons. Additionally, there is a small shift inward in the peak of the conventional overdensity correlation function, a mass-weighted statistic. This shift occurs when high density peaks move toward each other. We explore whether this shift can be removed by applying to the density field a transform (such as a logarithm) that gives fairer statistical weight to fluctuations in underdense regions. Using configuration-space perturbation theory in the Zel'dovich approximation, we find that the log-density correlation function shows a much smaller inward shift in the position of the BAO peak at low redshift than is seen in the overdensity correlation function. We also show that if the initial, Lagrangian density of matter parcels could be estimated at their Eulerian positions, giving a displaced-initial-density field, its peak shift would be even smaller. In fact, a transformed field that accentuates underdensities, such as the reciprocal of the density, pushes the peak the other way, outward. In our model, these shifts in the peak position can be attributed to shift terms, involving the derivative of the linear correlation function, that entirely vanish in this displaced-initial-density field.
  • We examine the Lagrangian divergence of the displacement field, arguably a more natural object than the density in a Lagrangian description of cosmological large-scale structure. This quantity, which we denote \psi, quantifies the stretching and distortion of the initially homogeneous lattice of dark-matter particles in the universe. \psi\ encodes similar information as the density, but the correspondence has subtleties. It corresponds better to the log-density A than the overdensity \delta. A Gaussian distribution in \psi\ produces a distribution in A with slight skewness; in \delta, we find that in many cases the skewness is further increased by 3. A local spherical-collapse-based (SC) fit found by Bernardeau gives a formula for \psi's particle-by-particle behavior that works quite well, better than applying Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) at first or second (2LPT) order. In 2LPT, there is a roughly parabolic relation between initial and final \psi\ that can give overdensities in deep voids, so low-redshift, high-resolution 2LPT realizations should be used with caution. The SC fit excels at predicting \psi\ until streams cross; then, for particles forming haloes, \psi\ plummets as in a waterfall to -3. This gives a new method for producing N-particle realizations. Compared to LPT realizations, such SC realizations give reduced stream-crossing, and better visual and 1-point-PDF correspondence to the results of full gravity. LPT, on the other hand, predicts large-scale flows and the large-scale power-spectrum amplitude better, unless an empirical correction is added to the SC formula.
  • In a cold-dark-matter universe, cosmological structure formation proceeds in rough analogy to origami folding. Dark matter occupies a three-dimensional 'sheet' of free- fall observers, non-intersecting in six-dimensional velocity-position phase space. At early times, the sheet was flat like an origami sheet, i.e. velocities were essentially zero, but as time passes, the sheet folds up to form cosmic structure. The present paper further illustrates this analogy, and clarifies a Lagrangian definition of caustics and streams: caustics are two-dimensional surfaces in this initial sheet along which it folds, tessellating Lagrangian space into a set of three-dimensional regions, i.e. streams. The main scientific result of the paper is that streams may be colored by only two colors, with no two neighbouring streams (i.e. streams on either side of a caustic surface) colored the same. The two colors correspond to positive and negative parities of local Lagrangian volumes. This is a severe restriction on the connectivity and therefore arrangement of streams in Lagrangian space, since arbitrarily many colors can be necessary to color a general arrangement of three-dimensional regions. This stream two-colorability has consequences from graph theory, which we explain. Then, using N-body simulations, we test how these caustics correspond in Lagrangian space to the boundaries of haloes, filaments and walls. We also test how well outer caustics correspond to a Zel'dovich-approximation prediction.
  • Tessellations are valuable both conceptually and for analysis in the study of the large-scale structure of the universe. They provide a conceptual model for the 'cosmic web,' and are of great use to analyze cosmological data. Here we describe tessellations in another set of coordinates, of the initially flat sheet of dark matter that gravity folds up in rough analogy to origami. The folds that develop are called caustics, and they tessellate space into stream regions. Tessellations of the dark-matter sheet are also useful in simulation analysis, for instance for density measurement, and to identify structures where streams overlap.
  • We present the ORIGAMI method of identifying structures, particularly halos, in cosmological N-body simulations. Structure formation can be thought of as the folding of an initially flat three-dimensional manifold in six-dimensional phase space. ORIGAMI finds the outer folds that delineate these structures. Halo particles are identified as those that have undergone shell-crossing along 3 orthogonal axes, providing a dynamical definition of halo regions that is independent of density. ORIGAMI also identifies other morphological structures: particles that have undergone shell-crossing along 2, 1, or 0 orthogonal axes correspond to filaments, walls, and voids respectively. We compare this method to a standard Friends-of-Friends halo-finding algorithm and find that ORIGAMI halos are somewhat larger, more diffuse, and less spherical, though the global properties of ORIGAMI halos are in good agreement with other modern halo-finding algorithms.
  • Motivated by recent results on lognormal statistics showing that the moment hierarchy of a lognormal variable completely fails at capturing its information content in the large variance regime, we discuss in this work the inadequacy of the hierarchy of correlation functions to describe a correlated lognormal field, which provides a roughly accurate description of the non-linear cosmological matter density field. We present families of fields having the same hierarchy of correlation functions than the lognormal field at all orders. This explicitly demonstrates the little studied though known fact that the correlation function hierarchy never provides a complete description of a lognormal field, and that it fails to capture information in the non-linear regime, where other simple observables are left totally unconstrained. We discuss why perturbative, Edgeworth-like approaches to statistics in the non-linear regime, common in cosmology, can never reproduce or predict that effect, and why it is however generic for tailed fields, hinting at a breakdown of the perturbation theory based on the field fluctuations. We make a rough but successful quantitative connection to N-body simulations results, that showed that the spectrum of the log-density field carries more information than the spectrum of the field entering the non-linear regime.
  • We investigate the use of a logarithmic density variable in estimating the Lagrangian displacement field, motivated by the success of a logarithmic transformation in restoring information to the matter power spectrum. The logarithmic relation is an extension of the linear relation, motivated by the continuity equation, in which the density field is assumed to be proportional to the divergence of the displacement field; we compare the linear and logarithmic relations by measuring both of these fields directly in a cosmological N-body simulation. The relative success of the logarithmic and linear relations depends on the scale at which the density field is smoothed. Thus we explore several ways of measuring the density field, including Cloud-In-Cell smoothing, adaptive smoothing, and the (scale-independent) Delaunay tessellation, and we use both a Fourier space and a geometrical tessellation approach to measuring the divergence. We find that the relation between the divergence of the displacement field and the density is significantly tighter with a logarithmic density variable, especially at low redshifts and for very small (~2 Mpc/h) smoothing scales. We find that the grid-based methods are more reliable than the tessellation-based method of calculating both the density and the divergence fields, though in both cases the logarithmic relation works better in the appropriate regime, which corresponds to nonlinear scales for the grid-based methods and low densities for the tessellation-based method.