• Far-infrared astronomy has advanced rapidly since its inception in the late 1950's, driven by a maturing technology base and an expanding community of researchers. This advancement has shown that observations at far-infrared wavelengths are important in nearly all areas of astrophysics, from the search for habitable planets and the origin of life, to the earliest stages of galaxy assembly in the first few hundred million years of cosmic history. The combination of a still developing portfolio of technologies, particularly in the field of detectors, and a widening ensemble of platforms within which these technologies can be deployed, means that far-infrared astronomy holds the potential for paradigm-shifting advances over the next decade. In this review, we examine current and future far-infrared observing platforms, including ground-based, sub-orbital, and space-based facilities, and discuss the technology development pathways that will enable and enhance these platforms to best address the challenges facing far-infrared astronomy in the 21st century.
  • Energetic feedback by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) plays an important evolutionary role in the regulation of star formation (SF) on galactic scales. However, the effects of this feedback as a function of redshift and galaxy properties such as mass, environment and cold gas content remain poorly understood. The broad frequency coverage (1 to 116 GHz), high sensitivity (up to ten times higher than the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array), and superb angular resolution (maximum baselines of at least a few hundred km) of the proposed next generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) are uniquely poised to revolutionize our understanding of AGNs and their role in galaxy evolution. Here, we provide an overview of the science related to AGN feedback that will be possible in the ngVLA era and present new continuum ngVLA imaging simulations of resolved radio jets spanning a wide range of intrinsic extents. We also consider key computational challenges and discuss exciting opportunities for multi-wavelength synergy with other next-generation instruments, such as the Square Kilometer Array and the James Webb Space Telescope. The unique combination of high-resolution, large collecting area, and wide frequency range will enable significant advancements in our understanding of the effects of jet-driven feedback on sub-galactic scales, particularly for sources with extents of a few pc to a few kpc such as young and/or lower-power radio AGNs, AGNs hosted by low-mass galaxies, radio jets that are interacting strongly with the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, and AGNs at high redshift.
  • We obtained $XMM-Newton$ observations of two highly luminous dust-reddened quasars, F2M1113+1244 and F2M1656+3821, that appear to be in the early, transitional phase predicted by merger-driven models of quasar/galaxy co-evolution. These sources have been well-studied at optical through mid-infrared wavelengths and are growing relatively rapidly, with Eddington ratios $>30\%$. Their black hole masses are relatively small compared to their host galaxies placing them below the $M_{\rm BH} - L_{\rm bulge}$ relation. We find that for both sources, an absorbed power-law model with $1-3\%$ of the intrinsic continuum scattered or leaked back into the line-of-sight best fits their X-ray spectra. We measure the absorbing column density ($N_H$) and constrain the dust-to-gas ratios in these systems, finding that they lie well below the Galactic value. This, combined with the presence of broad emission lines in their optical and near-infrared spectra, suggests that the dust absorption occurs far from the nucleus, in the host galaxy, while the X-rays are mostly absorbed in the nuclear, dust-free region within the sublimation radius. We also compare the quasars' absorption-corrected, rest-frame X-ray luminosities ($2-10$ keV) to their rest-frame infrared luminosities (6$\mu$m) and find that red quasars, similar to other populations of luminous obscured quasars, are either underluminous in X-rays or overluminous in the infrared.
  • The nearby dwarf galaxy NGC404 harbors a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered by the lowest-mass (< 150,000 solar-masses) central massive black hole (MBH) with a dynamical mass constraint currently known, thus providing a rare low-redshift analog to the MBH "seeds" that formed in the early Universe. Here, we present new imaging of the nucleus of NGC404 at 12-18 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of the CO(2-1) line with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). For the first time, we have successfully resolved the nuclear radio emission, revealing a centrally peaked, extended source spanning 17 pc. Combined with previous VLA observations, our new data place a tight constraint on the radio spectral index and indicate an optically-thin synchrotron origin for the emission. The peak of the resolved radio source coincides with the dynamical center of NGC404, the center of a rotating disk of molecular gas, and the position of a compact, hard X-ray source. We also present evidence for shocks in the NGC404 nucleus from archival narrowband HST imaging, Chandra X-ray data, and Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy, and discuss possible origins for the shock excitation. Given the morphology, location, and steep spectral index of the resolved radio source, as well as constraints on nuclear star formation from the ALMA CO(2-1) data, we find the most likely scenario for the origin of the radio source in the center of NGC404 to be a radio outflow associated with a confined jet driven by the active nucleus.
  • We present HST WFC3 F160W imaging and infrared spectral energy distributions for twelve extremely luminous, obscured AGN at $1.8<z<2.7$, selected via "Hot, Dust Obscured" mid-infrared colors. Their infrared luminosities span $2-15\times10^{13}$L$_{\odot}$, making them among the most luminous objects in the Universe at $z\sim2$. In all cases the infrared emission is consistent with arising at least in most part from AGN activity. The AGN fractional luminosities are higher than those in either sub-millimeter galaxies, or AGN selected via other mid-infrared criteria. Adopting the $G$, M$_{20}$ and $A$ morphological parameters, together with traditional classification boundaries, infers that three quarters of the sample as mergers. Our sample do not, however, show any correlation between the considered morphological parameters and either infrared luminosity or AGN fractional luminosity. Moreover, their asymmetries and effective radii are distributed identically to those of massive galaxies at $z\sim2$. We conclude that our sample is not preferentially associated with mergers, though a significant merger fraction is still plausible. Instead, we propose that our sample are examples of the massive galaxy population at $z\sim2$ that harbor a briefly luminous, "flickering" AGN, and in which the $G$ and M$_{20}$ values have been perturbed, due to either the AGN, and/or the earliest formation stages of a bulge in an inside-out manner. Furthermore, we find that the mass assembly of the central black holes in our sample leads the mass assembly of any bulge component. Finally, we speculate that our sample represent a small fraction of the immediate antecedents of compact star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$.
  • We apply The Tractor image modeling code to improve upon existing multi-band photometry for the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). SERVS consists of post-cryogenic Spitzer observations at 3.6 and 4.5 micron over five well-studied deep fields spanning 18 square degrees. In concert with data from ground-based near-infrared (NIR) and optical surveys, SERVS aims to provide a census of the properties of massive galaxies out to z ~ 5. To accomplish this, we are using The Tractor to perform "forced photometry." This technique employs prior measurements of source positions and surface brightness profiles from a high-resolution fiducial band from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to model and fit the fluxes at lower-resolution bands. We discuss our implementation of The Tractor over a square degree test region within the XMM-LSS field with deep imaging in 12 NIR/optical bands. Our new multi-band source catalogs offer a number of advantages over traditional position-matched catalogs, including 1) consistent source cross-identification between bands, 2) de-blending of sources that are clearly resolved in the fiducial band but blended in the lower-resolution SERVS data, 3) a higher source detection fraction in each band, 4) a larger number of candidate galaxies in the redshift range 5 < z < 6, and 5) a statistically significant improvement in the photometric redshift accuracy as evidenced by the significant decrease in the fraction of outliers compared to spectroscopic redshifts. Thus, forced photometry using The Tractor offers a means of improving the accuracy of multi-band extragalactic surveys designed for galaxy evolution studies. We will extend our application of this technique to the full SERVS footprint in the future.
  • We use ALMA to detect and image CO (1-0) emission from Minkowski's Object, a dwarf galaxy that is interacting with a radio jet from a nearby elliptical galaxy. These observations are the first to detect molecular gas in Minkowski's Object. We estimate the range in the mass of molecular gas in Minkowski's Object assuming two different values of the ratio of the molecular gas mass to the CO luminosity, $\alpha_{\rm CO}$. For the Milky Way value of $\alpha_{\rm CO}=4.6~M_{\odot}{\rm (K~km~s^{-1}~pc^2)^{-1}}$ we obtain a molecular gas mass of $M_{\rm H_2} =3.0 \times 10^7~M_{\odot}$, 6% of the HI gas mass. We also use the prescription of Narayanan et al. (2012) to estimate an $\alpha_{\rm CO}=27~M_{\odot}{\rm (K~km~s^{-1}~pc^2)^{-1}}$, in which case we obtain $M_{\rm H_2} =1.8 \times 10^8~M_{\odot}$, 36% of the HI mass. The observations are consistent with previous claims of star formation being induced in Minkowski's Object via the passage of the radio jet, and it therefore being a rare local example of positive feedback from an AGN. In particular, we find highly efficient star formation, with gas depletion timescales $\sim 5\times 10^7 - 3\times 10^8$yr (for assumed values of $\alpha_{\rm CO}=4.6$ and $27~M_{\odot}{\rm (K~km~s^{-1}~pc^2)^{-1}}$, respectively) in the upstream regions of Minkowski's Object that were struck first by the jet, and less efficient star formation downstream. We discuss the implications of this observation for models of jet induced star formation and radio mode feedback in massive galaxies.
  • We present results of two- and three-dimensional, multi-physics simulations of an AGN jet colliding with an intergalactic cloud. The purpose of these simulations is to assess the degree of "positive feedback," i.e. jet-induced star formation, that results from such a collision. We have specifically tailored our simulation parameters to facilitate comparison with recent observations of Minkowski's Object (M.O.), a stellar nursery located at the termination point of a radio jet coming from galaxy NGC 541. As shown in our simulations, such a collision triggers shocks which propagate around and through the cloud. These shocks condense the gas and trigger cooling instabilities, creating runaway increases in density, to the point that individual clumps can become Jeans unstable. Our simulations provide information about the expected star formation rate, total mass converted to \ion{H}{1}, H$_2$, and stars, and the relative velocity of the stars and gas. Our results confirm the possibility of jet-induced star formation, though fail to match the level observed in M.O. We discuss ways in which the agreement might be improved in future simulations.
  • With high over-subscription rates and significant operational costs, observatories must ensure that their operations are efficient and effective. A number of key performance indicators are generally used to evaluate the observatory's performance among which are the numbers of publications and citations of refereed journal articles to measure the overall scientific impact. Those measures, however, are broad and can not assess whether the observatory was successful on a project-by-project basis to deliver data to the PIs enabling them to carry out their science and to publish their results. In particular the reasons that prevented PIs from publishing remain hidden. Understanding and acting upon those reasons, however, have the potential to substantially improve the observatory's operational model. Of course not every approved project even should lead to a publication. Indeed, the risk of not finding the expected (or any unexpected) science in the data the PI receives is an inherent and indispensable part of the scientific process. But even here, measuring the fraction of such projects can lead to valuable insights which might then be used to instruct future proposal review committees. To fully close the loop on the end-to-end data-flow, ALMA has started in March 2015 to send survey questions to PIs where two years after the end of the proprietary period no publication making use of the delivered data could be identified. We describe our method as well as the type of conclusions we hope to be able to draw once a statistically relevant sample of answers has been received.
  • Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S_{1.4GHz} >= 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an AGN. Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} <= 1 mJy). The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 mum IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for, and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that they are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z >= 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} ~ 100 muJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z ~ 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios > 500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios (~ 100--200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.
  • We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of 115 deg^2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its 'warm' mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z > 3 to test various models for "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z > 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5{\sigma} depths of 6.13 {\mu}Jy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 {\mu}Jy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively - depths significantly fainter than WISE. We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically-confirmed quasars (98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z > 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.1 million sources, a 4.5 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing 5.4 million sources.
  • We investigate the relation between star formation rates ($\dot{M}_{s}$) and AGN properties in optically selected type 1 quasars at $2<z<3$ using data from Herschel and the SDSS. We find that $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ remains approximately constant with redshift, at $300\pm100~\rm{M}_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$. Conversely, $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ increases with AGN luminosity, up to a maximum of $\sim600~\rm{M}_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, and with CIV FWHM. In context with previous results, this is consistent with a relation between $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ and black hole accretion rate ($\dot{\rm{M}}_{bh}$) existing in only parts of the $z-\dot{\rm{M}}_{s}-\dot{\rm{M}}_{bh}$ plane, dependent on the free gas fraction, the trigger for activity, and the processes that may quench star formation. The relations between $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ and both AGN luminosity and CIV FWHM are consistent with star formation rates in quasars scaling with black hole mass, though we cannot rule out a separate relation with black hole accretion rate. Star formation rates are observed to decline with increasing CIV equivalent width. This decline can be partially explained via the Baldwin effect, but may have an additional contribution from one or more of three factors; $M_i$ is not a linear tracer of L$_{2500}$, the Baldwin effect changes form at high AGN luminosities, and high CIV EW values signpost a change in the relation between $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ and $\dot{\rm{M}}_{bh}$. Finally, there is no strong relation between $\dot{\rm{M}}_s$ and Eddington ratio, or the asymmetry of the CIV line. The former suggests that star formation rates do not scale with how efficiently the black hole is accreting, while the latter is consistent with CIV asymmetries arising from orientation effects.
  • We present ALMA 870 micron (345 GHz) data for 49 high redshift (0.47<z<2.85), luminous (11.7 < log L(bol) (Lsun) < 14.2) radio-powerful AGN, obtained to constrain cool dust emission from starbursts concurrent with highly obscured radiative-mode black hole (BH) accretion in massive galaxies which possess a small radio jet. The sample was selected from WISE with extremely steep (red) mid-infrared (MIR) colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 microns, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7 < log P3.0 GHz (W/Hz) < 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log M(BH) (Msun) < 10.2. The rest frame 1-5 um SEDs are very similar to the "Hot DOGs" (Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA detected sources are 9.9 < log M(ISM) (Msun) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates (SFRs) reaching several thousand Msun/yr, depending on the assumed dust temperature, however we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with ~ equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10-15 Myr) compact starburst.
  • We present observations and analysis of an unusual [C II] emission line in the very luminous QSO SDSS J155426.16+193703.0 at z~4.6. The line is extremely broad (FWHM 735 km/s) and seems to have a flat-topped or double-peaked line profile. A velocity map of the line shows a gradient across the source that indicates large-scale rotation of star-forming gas. Together, the velocity map and line profile suggest the presence of a massive rotating disc with a dynamical mass M_dyn > 5x10^10 M_sun. Using the assumption of a rotating disc origin, we employ an empirical relation between galaxy disc circular velocity and bulge velocity dispersion (sigma) to estimate that sigma > 310 km/s, subject to a correction for the unknown disc inclination. This result implies that this source is consistent with the local M--sigma relation, or offset at most by an order of magnitude in black hole mass. In contrast, the assumption of a bulge origin for the [C II] emission line would lead to a conclusion that the black hole is nearly two orders of magnitude more massive than predicted by the M--sigma relation, similar to previous findings for other high-redshift QSOs. As disc rotation may be a common origin for [C II] emission at high redshifts, these results stress that careful consideration of dynamical origins is required when using observations of this line to derive properties of high-redshift galaxies.
  • We study the environments of 49 WISE/NVSS-selected dusty, hyper-luminous, z~2 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 345GHz images. We find that 17 of the 49 WISE/NVSS sources show additional sub-mm galaxies within the ALMA primary beam, probing scales within ~150 kpc. We find a total of 23 additional sub-mm sources, four of which in the field of a single WISE/NVSS source. The measured 870 um source counts are ~10 times expectations for unbiased regions, suggesting such hyper-luminous dusty quasars are excellent at probing high-density peaks.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, is the largest astronomical project in existence. While ALMA's capabilities are ramping up, Early Science observations have started. The ALMA Archive is at the center of the operations of the telescope array and is designed to manage the 200 TB of data that will be taken each year, once the observatory is in full operations. We briefly describe design principles. The second part of this paper focuses on how astronomy is likely to evolve as the amount and complexity of data taken grows. We argue that in the future observatories will compete for astronomers to work with their data, that observatories will have to reorient themselves to from providing good data only to providing an excellent end-to-end user-experience with all its implications, that science-grade data-reduction pipelines will become an integral part of the design of a new observatory or instrument and that all this evolution will have a deep impact on how astronomers will do science. We show how ALMA's design principles are in line with this paradigm.
  • We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850microns submillimetre (submm) observations of 30 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous AGN, detected jointly by the WISE all-sky IR survey and the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and compact radio counterparts. Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. These galaxies appear to be consistent with an AGN-dominated galaxy, and could be a transient phase of merging galaxies. When comparing the number of submm galaxies (SMGs) detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5-arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE/radio-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments, that could be forming in pre-viralised clusters of galaxies. WISE/radio-selected AGNs appear to be the strongest signposts of high-density regions of active, luminous and dusty galaxies. SCUBA-2 850microns observations indicate that their submm fluxes are low compared to many popular AGN SED templates, hence the WISE/radio-selected AGNs have either less cold and/or more warm dust emission than normally assumed for typical AGN. Most of the targets are not detected, only four targets are detected at SCUBA-2 850microns, and have total IR luminosities >= 10^13 L_solar, if their redshifts are consistent with the subset of the 10 SCUBA-2 undetected targets with known redshifts, z ~ 0.44 - 2.86.
  • We present luminosity functions derived from a spectroscopic survey of AGN selected from Spitzer Space Telescope imaging surveys. Selection in the mid-infrared is significantly less affected by dust obscuration. We can thus compare the luminosity functions of the obscured and unobscured AGN in a more reliable fashion than by using optical or X-ray data alone. We find that the AGN luminosity function can be well described by a broken power-law model in which the break luminosity decreases with redshift. At high redshifts ($z>1.6$), we find significantly more AGN at a given bolometric luminosity than found by either optical quasar surveys or hard X-ray surveys. The fraction of obscured AGN decreases rapidly with increasing AGN luminosity, but, at least at high redshifts, appears to remain at $\approx 50$\% even at bolometric luminosities $\sim 10^{14}L_{\odot}$. The data support a picture in which the obscured and unobscured populations evolve differently, with some evidence that high luminosity obscured quasars peak in space density at a higher redshift than their unobscured counterparts. The amount of accretion energy in the Universe estimated from this work suggests that AGN contribute about 12\% to the total radiation intensity of the Universe, and a high radiative accretion efficiency $\approx 0.18^{+0.12}_{-0.07}$ is required to match current estimates of the local mass density in black holes.
  • We report the discovery of a grand-design spiral galaxy associated with a double-lobed radio source. J1649+2635 (z = 0.0545) is a red spiral galaxy with a prominent bulge that it is associated with a L$_{1.4{\rm GHz}}\sim$10$^{24}$WHz$^{-1}$ double-lobed radio source that spans almost 100kpc. J1649+2635 has a black hole mass of M$_{\rm BH} \sim$ 3--7 $\times$ 10$^8$M$_{\odot}$ and SFR$\sim$ 0.26 -- 2.6M$_{\odot}$year$^{-1}$. The galaxy hosts a $\sim$96kpc diffuse optical halo, which is unprecedented for spiral galaxies. We find that J1649+2635 resides in an overdense environment with a mass of M$_{dyn} = 7.7^{+7.9}_{-4.3} \times 10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$, likely a galaxy group below the detection threshold of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We suggest one possible scenario for the association of double-lobed radio emission from J1649+2635 is that the source may be similar to a Seyfert galaxy, located in a denser-than-normal environment. The study of spiral galaxies that host large-scale radio emission is important because although rare in the local Universe, these sources may be more common at high-redshifts.
  • Understanding the evolution of accretion activity is fundamental to our understanding of how galaxies form and evolve over the history of the Universe. We analyse a complete sample of 27 radio galaxies which includes both high-excitation (HEGs) and low excitation galaxies (LEGs), spanning a narrow redshift range of 0.9 < z < 1.1 and covering a factor of ~1000 in radio luminosity. Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope combined with ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, we show that the host galaxies have masses in the range of 10.7 < log (M /M_sun) < 12.0 with HEGs and LEGs exhibiting no difference in their mass distributions. We also find that HEGs accrete at significantly higher rates than LEGs, with the HEG/LEG division lying at an Eddington ratio of ~0.04, which is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of where the accretion rate becomes radiatively inefficient, thus supporting the idea of HEGs and LEGs being powered by different modes of accretion. Our study also shows that at least up to L_151MHz ~3x10^27 W /Hz /sr, HEGs and LEGs are indistinguishable in terms of their radio properties. From this result we infer that, at least for the lower radio luminosity range, another factor besides accretion rate must play an important role in the process of triggering jet activity.
  • KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources are one of the efficient tracers of powerful High-z Radio Galaxies (HzRGs). In contrast to searches for powerful HzRGs from radio surveys of moderate depths, fainter USS samples derived from deeper radio surveys can be useful in finding HzRGs at even higher redshifts and in unveiling a population of obscured weaker radio-loud AGN at moderate redshifts. Using our 325 MHz GMRT observations (5-sigma ~ 800 microJy) and 1.4 GHz VLA observations (5-sigma ~ 80 - 100 microJy) available in two subfields (viz., VLA-VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VLA-VVDS) and Subaru X-ray Deep Field (SXDF)) of the XMM-LSS field, we derive a large sample of 160 faint USS radio sources and characterize their nature. The optical, IR counterparts of our USS sample sources are searched using existing deep surveys, at respective wavelengths. We attempt to unveil the nature of our faint USS sources using diagnostic techniques based on mid-IR colors, flux ratios of radio to mid-IR, and radio luminosities. Redshift estimates are available for 86/116 (~ 74%) USS sources in the VLA-VVDS field and for 39/44 (~ 87%) USS sources in the SXDF fields with median values (z_median) ~ 1.18 and ~ 1.57, which are higher than that for non-USS radio sources (z_median non-USS ~ 0.99 and ~ 0.96), in the two subfields, respectively. The flux ratio of radio to mid-IR (S_1.4 GHz/S_3.6 micron) versus redshift diagnostic plot suggests that more than half of our USS sample sources distributed over z ~ 0.5 to 3.8 are likely to be hosted in obscured environments. A significant fraction (~ 26% in the VLA-VVDS and ~ 13% in the SXDF) of our USS sources without redshift estimates mostly remain unidentified in the existing optical, IR surveys, and exhibit high radio to mid-IR flux ratio limits similar to HzRGs, and thus, can be considered as potential HzRG candidates.
  • We present the results of a pilot survey to find dust-reddened quasars by matching the FIRST radio catalog to the UKIDSS near-infrared survey, and using optical data from SDSS to select objects with very red colors. The deep K-band limit provided by UKIDSS allows for finding more heavily-reddened quasars at higher redshifts as compared with previous work using FIRST and 2MASS. We selected 87 candidates with K<=17.0 from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS) First Data Release (DR1) which covers 190 deg2. These candidates reach up to ~1.5 magnitudes below the 2MASS limit and obey the color criteria developed to identify dust-reddened quasars. We have obtained 61 spectroscopic observations in the optical and/or near-infrared as well as classifications in the literature and have identified 14 reddened quasars with E(B-V)>0.1, including three at z>2. We study the infrared properties of the sample using photometry from the WISE Observatory and find that infrared colors improve the efficiency of red quasar selection, removing many contaminants in an infrared-to-optical color-selected sample alone. The highest-redshift quasars (z > 2) are only moderately reddened, with E(B-V) ~ 0.2-0.3. We find that the surface density of red quasars rises sharply with faintness, comprising up to 17% of blue quasars at the same apparent K-band flux limit. We estimate that to reach more heavily reddened quasars (i.e., E(B-V) > 0.5) at z>2 and a depth of K=17 we would need to survey at least ~2.5 times more area.
  • We describe a method to measure the M-sigma relation in the non-local universe using dust-obscured QSOs. We present results from a pilot sample of nine 2MASS red QSOs with redshifts 0.14<z<0.37. We find that there is an offset (0.8 dex, on average) between the position of our objects and the local relation for AGN, in the sense that the majority of red QSO hosts have lower velocity dispersions and/or more massive BHs than local galaxies. These results are in agreement with recent studies of AGN at similar and higher redshifts. This could indicate an unusually rapid growth in the host galaxies since z~0.2, if these objects were to land in the local relation at present time. However, the z>0.1 AGN (including our sample and those of previous studies) have significantly higher BH mass than those of local AGN, so a direct comparison is not straightforward. Further, using several samples of local and higher-z AGN, we find a striking trend of an increasing offset with respect to the local M-sigma relation as a function of AGN luminosity, with virtually all objects with log(L_5100/erg s^-1) > 43.6 falling above the relation. Given the relatively small number of AGN at z>0.1 for which there are direct measurements of stellar velocity dispersions, it is impossible at present to determine whether there truly is evolution in M-sigma with redshift. Larger, carefully selected samples of AGN are necessary to disentangle the dependence of M-sigma on mass, luminosity, accretion rates, and redshift.
  • We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of thirteen redshift 0.4<z<1 dust-reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic AGN luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from HST imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass -- bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the OIII 5007 Angstrom emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.