• We present the cluster mass-richness scaling relation calibrated by a weak lensing analysis of >18000 galaxy cluster candidates in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Detected using the 3D-Matched-Filter cluster-finder of Milkeraitis et al., these cluster candidates span a wide range of masses, from the small group scale up to $\sim10^{15} M_{\odot}$, and redshifts 0.2 $\lesssim z\lesssim$ 0.9. The total significance of the stacked shear measurement amounts to 54$\sigma$. We compare cluster masses determined using weak lensing shear and magnification, finding the measurements in individual richness bins to yield 1$\sigma$ compatibility, but with magnification estimates biased low. This first direct mass comparison yields important insights for improving the systematics handling of future lensing magnification work. In addition, we confirm analyses that suggest cluster miscentring has an important effect on the observed 3D-MF halo profiles, and we quantify this by fitting for projected cluster centroid offsets, which are typically $\sim$ 0.4 arcmin. We bin the cluster candidates as a function of redshift, finding similar cluster masses and richness across the full range up to $z \sim$ 0.9. We measure the 3D-MF mass-richness scaling relation $M_{200} = M_0 (N_{200} / 20)^\beta$. We find a normalization $M_0 \sim (2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.4}) \times 10^{13} M_{\odot}$, and a logarithmic slope of $\beta \sim 1.4 \pm 0.1$, both of which are in 1$\sigma$ agreement with results from the magnification analysis. We find no evidence for a redshift-dependence of the normalization. The CFHTLenS 3D-MF cluster catalogue is now available at cfhtlens.org.
  • Gravitational lensing magnification is measured with a significance of 9.7 sigma on a large sample of galaxy clusters in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). This survey covers ~154 deg^2 and contains over 18,000 cluster candidates at redshifts 0.2 <= z <= 0.9, detected using the 3D-Matched Filter cluster-finder of Milkeraitis et al. (2010). We fit composite-NFW models to the ensemble, accounting for cluster miscentering, source-lens redshift overlap, as well as nearby structure (the 2-halo term), and recover mass estimates of the cluster dark matter halos in range of ~10^13 M_sun to 2*10^14 M_sun. Cluster richness is measured for the entire sample, and we bin the clusters according to both richness and redshift. A mass-richness relation M_200 = M_0 (N_200 / 20)^beta is fit to the measurements. For two different cluster miscentering models we find consistent results for the normalization and slope, M_0 = (2.3 +/- 0.2)*10^13 M_sun, beta = 1.4 +/- 0.1 and M_0 = (2.2 +/- 0.2)*10^13 M_sun, beta = 1.5 +/- 0.1. We find that accounting for the full redshift distribution of lenses and sources is important, since any overlap can have an impact on mass estimates inferred from flux magnification.
  • We propose a new approach for measuring the mass profile and shape of groups and clusters of galaxies, which uses lensing magnification of distant background galaxies. The main advantage of lensing magnification is that, unlike lensing shear, it relies on accurate photometric redshifts only and not galaxy shapes, thus enabling the study of the dark matter distribution with unresolved source galaxies. We present a feasibility study, using a real population of z > 2.5 Lyman Break Galaxies as source galaxies, and where, similar to galaxy-galaxy lensing, foreground lenses are stacked in order to increase the signal-to-noise. We find that there is an interesting new observational window for gravitational lensing as a probe of dark matter halos at high redshift, which does not require measurement of galaxy shapes.
  • We present photometric, spectroscopic and weak lensing analysis of the large-scale structure and dynamics of the most X-ray luminous galaxy cluster known, RX J1347-1145, at z=0.451. We spectroscopically confirmed 47 new members with LDSS3 on the Magellan telescope. Together with previously known members, we measure a new velocity dispersion of 1163(+/-97) km/s. The mass inferred from our velocity dispersion is M200 = 1.16^{+0.32}_{-0.27}x10^{15} solar mass, with r200=1.85Mpc, under the assumption of a singular isothermal sphere. We also present a weak lensing analysis using deep CFHT data on this cluster, and find a deprojected mass of 1.47^{+0.46}_{-0.43}x10^{15} solar mass within r200, in excellent agreement with our dynamical estimate. Thus, our new dynamical mass estimate is consistent with that from weak lensing and X-ray studies in the literature, resolving a previously claimed discrepancy. We photometrically detect and spectroscopically confirm another massive cluster with sigma=780(+/-100) km/s and M200=3.4^{+1.4}_{-1.1}x10^{14} solar mass ~7Mpc south-west of RX J1347-1145, which we refer to as RXJ1347-SW. Our spectroscopic survey reveals a possible excess of galaxies in velocity space in the region between RX J1347-1145 and RXJ1347-SW; comparing with simulations, this excess appears consistent with that expected from a large filamentary structure traced by galaxies connecting these two clusters.