• This paper contains an extensive combinatorial analysis of the single-peaked domain restriction and investigates the likelihood that an election is single-peaked. We provide a very general upper bound result for domain restrictions that can be defined by certain forbidden configurations. This upper bound implies that many domain restrictions (including the single-peaked restriction) are very unlikely to appear in a random election chosen according to the Impartial Culture assumption. For single-peaked elections, this upper bound can be refined and complemented by a lower bound that is asymptotically tight. In addition, we provide exact results for elections with few voters or candidates. Moreover, we consider the P\'{o}lya urn model and the Mallows model and obtain lower bounds showing that single-peakedness is considerably more likely to appear for certain parameterizations.
  • This paper is an axiomatic study of consistent approval-based multi-winner rules, i.e., voting rules that select a fixed-size group of candidates based on approval ballots. We introduce the class of counting rules and provide an axiomatic characterization of this class based on the consistency axiom. Building upon this result, we axiomatically characterize three important consistent multi-winner rules: Proportional Approval Voting, Multi-Winner Approval Voting and the Approval Chamberlin--Courant rule. Our results demonstrate the variety of multi-winner rules and illustrate three different, orthogonal principles that multi-winner voting rules may represent: individual excellence, diversity, and proportionality.
  • Liquid democracy is a proxy voting method where proxies are delegable. We propose and study a game-theoretic model of liquid democracy to address the following question: when is it rational for a voter to delegate her vote? We study the existence of pure-strategy Nash equilibria in this model, and how group accuracy is affected by them. We complement these results by means of simulations to study the effects of delegations on group's accuracy on various network structures.
  • To choose a multi-winner rule, i.e., a voting rule that selects a subset of $k$ alternatives based on preferences of a certain population, is a hard and ambiguous task. Depending on the context, it varies widely what constitutes an "optimal" committee. In this paper, we offer a new perspective to measure the quality of committees and---consequently---multi-winner rules. We provide a quantitative analysis using methods from the theory of approximation algorithms and estimate how well multi-winner rules approximate two extreme objectives: diversity as captured by the (Approval) Chamberlin--Courant rule (CC) and individual excellence as captured by Approval Voting (AV). With both theoretical and experimental methods we establish a classification of multi-winner rules in terms of their quantitative alignment with these two opposing objectives.
  • Manipulation, bribery, and control are well-studied ways of changing the outcome of an election. Many voting rules are, in the general case, computationally resistant to some of these manipulative actions. However when restricted to single-peaked electorates, these rules suddenly become easy to manipulate. Recently, Faliszewski, Hemaspaandra, and Hemaspaandra studied the computational complexity of strategic behavior in nearly single-peaked electorates. These are electorates that are not single-peaked but close to it according to some distance measure. In this paper we introduce several new distance measures regarding single-peakedness. We prove that determining whether a given profile is nearly single-peaked is NP-complete in many cases. For one case we present a polynomial-time algorithm. In case the single-peaked axis is given, we show that determining the distance is always possible in polynomial time. Furthermore, we explore the relations between the new notions introduced in this paper and existing notions from the literature.
  • We identify a whole family of approval-based multi-winner voting rules that satisfy PJR. Moreover, we identify a subfamily of voting rules within this family that satisfy EJR. All these voting rules can be computed in polynomial time as long as the subalgorithms that characterize each rule within the family are polynomial. One of the voting rules that satisfy EJR can be computed in $O(n m k)$.
  • In this short note, we describe an approval-based committee selection rule that admits a polynomial-time algorithm and satisfies the Extended Justified Representation (EJR) axiom. This rule is based on approximately maximizing the PAV score, by means of local search. Our proof strategy is to show that this rule provides almost optimal average satisfaction to all cohesive groups of voters, and that high average satisfaction for cohesive groups implies extended justified representation.
  • We study two notions of stability in multiwinner elections that are based on the Condorcet criterion. The first notion was introduced by Gehrlein: A committee is stable if each committee member is preferred to each non-member by a (possibly weak) majority of voters. The second notion is called local stability (introduced in this paper): A size-$k$ committee is locally stable in an election with $n$ voters if there is no candidate $c$ and no group of more than $\frac{n}{k+1}$ voters such that each voter in this group prefers $c$ to each committee member. We argue that Gehrlein-stable committees are appropriate for shortlisting tasks, and that locally stable committees are better suited for applications that require proportional representation. The goal of this paper is to analyze these notions in detail, explore their compatibility with notions of proportionality, and investigate the computational complexity of related algorithmic tasks.
  • The Permutation Pattern Matching problem, asking whether a pattern permutation $\pi$ is contained in a permutation $\tau$, is known to be NP-complete. In this paper we present two polynomial time algorithms for special cases. The first algorithm is applicable if both $\pi$ and $\tau$ are $321$-avoiding; the second is applicable if $\pi$ and $\tau$ are skew-merged. Both algorithms have a runtime of $O(kn)$, where $k$ is the length of $\pi$ and $n$ the length of $\tau$.
  • In this paper we extend the principle of proportional representation to rankings. We consider the setting where alternatives need to be ranked based on approval preferences. In this setting, proportional representation requires that cohesive groups of voters are represented proportionally in each initial segment of the ranking. Proportional rankings are desirable in situations where initial segments of different lengths may be relevant, e.g., hiring decisions (if it is unclear how many positions are to be filled), the presentation of competing proposals on a liquid democracy platform (if it is unclear how many proposals participants are taking into consideration), or recommender systems (if a ranking has to accommodate different user types). We study the proportional representation provided by several ranking methods and prove theoretical guarantees. Furthermore, we experimentally evaluate these methods and present preliminary evidence as to which methods are most suitable for producing proportional rankings.
  • The goal of multi-winner elections is to choose a fixed-size committee based on voters' preferences. An important concern in this setting is representation: large groups of voters with cohesive preferences should be adequately represented by the election winners. Recently, Aziz et al. (2015a;2017) proposed two axioms that aim to capture this idea: justified representation (JR) and its strengthening extended justified representation (EJR). In this paper, we extend the work of Aziz et al. in several directions. First, we answer an open question of Aziz et al., by showing that Reweighted Approval Voting satisfies JR for $k=3, 4, 5$, but fails it for $k\ge 6$. Second, we observe that EJR is incompatible with the Perfect Representation criterion, which is important for many applications of multi-winner voting, and propose a relaxation of EJR, which we call Proportional Justified Representation (PJR). PJR is more demanding than JR, but, unlike EJR, it is compatible with perfect representation, and a committee that provides PJR can be computed in polynomial time if the committee size divides the number of voters. Moreover, just like EJR, PJR can be used to characterize the classic PAV rule in the class of weighted PAV rules. On the other hand, we show that EJR provides stronger guarantees with respect to average voter satisfaction than PJR does.
  • Many hard computational social choice problems are known to become tractable when voters' preferences belong to a restricted domain, such as those of single-peaked or single-crossing preferences. However, to date, all algorithmic results of this type have been obtained for the setting where each voter's preference list is a total order of candidates. The goal of this paper is to extend this line of research to the setting where voters' preferences are dichotomous, i.e., each voter approves a subset of candidates and disapproves the remaining candidates. We propose several analogues of the notions of single-peaked and single-crossing preferences for dichotomous profiles and investigate the relationships among them. We then demonstrate that for some of these notions the respective restricted domains admit efficient algorithms for computationally hard approval-based multi-winner rules.
  • The NP-complete Permutation Pattern Matching problem asks whether a $k$-permutation $P$ is contained in a $n$-permutation $T$ as a pattern. This is the case if there exists an order-preserving embedding of $P$ into $T$. In this paper, we present a fixed-parameter algorithm solving this problem with a worst-case runtime of $\mathcal{O}(1.79^{\mathsf{run}(T)}\cdot n\cdot k)$, where $\mathsf{run}(T)$ denotes the number of alternating runs of $T$. This algorithm is particularly well-suited for instances where $T$ has few runs, i.e., few ups and downs. Moreover, since $\mathsf{run}(T)<n$, this can be seen as a $\mathcal{O}(1.79^{n}\cdot n\cdot k)$ algorithm which is the first to beat the exponential $2^n$ runtime of brute-force search. Furthermore, we prove that under standard complexity theoretic assumptions such a fixed-parameter tractability result is not possible for $\mathsf{run}(P)$.
  • In the last years, different types of patterns in permutations have been studied: vincular, bivincular and mesh patterns, just to name a few. Every type of permutation pattern naturally defines a corresponding computational problem: Given a pattern P and a permutation T (the text), is P contained in T? In this paper we draw a map of the computational landscape of permutation pattern matching with different types of patterns. We provide a classical complexity analysis and investigate the impact of the pattern length on the computational hardness. Furthermore, we highlight several directions in which the study of computational aspects of permutation patterns could evolve.
  • The NP-complete Permutation Pattern Matching problem asks whether a permutation P (the pattern) can be matched into a permutation T (the text). A matching is an order-preserving embedding of P into T. In the Generalized Permutation Pattern Matching problem one can additionally enforce that certain adjacent elements in the pattern must be mapped to adjacent elements in the text. This paper studies the parameterized complexity of this more general problem. We show W[1]-completeness with respect to the length of the pattern P. Under standard complexity theoretic assumptions this implies that no fixed-parameter tractable algorithm can be found for any parameter depending solely on P.