• The work we present in this paper initiated the formal study of fractional hedonic games, coalition formation games in which the utility of a player is the average value he ascribes to the members of his coalition. Among other settings, this covers situations in which players only distinguish between friends and non-friends and desire to be in a coalition in which the fraction of friends is maximal. Fractional hedonic games thus not only constitute a natural class of succinctly representable coalition formation games, but also provide an interesting framework for network clustering. We propose a number of conditions under which the core of fractional hedonic games is non-empty and provide algorithms for computing a core stable outcome. By contrast, we show that the core may be empty in other cases, and that it is computationally hard in general to decide non-emptiness of the core.
  • We consider the one-to-one Pickup and Delivery Problem (PDP) in Euclidean Space with arbitrary dimension $d$ where $n$ transportation requests are picked i.i.d. with a separate origin-destination pair for each object to be moved. First, we consider the problem from the customer perspective where the objective is to compute a plan for transporting the objects such that the Euclidean distance traveled by the vehicles when carrying objects is minimized. We develop a polynomial time asymptotically optimal algorithm for vehicles with capacity $o(\sqrt[2d]{n})$ for this case. This result also holds imposing LIFO constraints for loading and unloading objects. Secondly, we extend our algorithm to the classical single-vehicle PDP where the objective is to minimize the total distance traveled by the vehicle and present results indicating that the extended algorithm is asymptotically optimal for a fixed vehicle capacity if the origins and destinations are picked i.i.d. using the same distribution.
  • Consider a situation with $n$ agents or players where some of the players form a coalition with a certain collective objective. Simple games are used to model systems that can decide whether coalitions are successful (winning) or not (losing). A simple game can be viewed as a monotone boolean function. The dimension of a simple game is the smallest positive integer $d$ such that the simple game can be expressed as the intersection of $d$ threshold functions where each threshold function uses a threshold and $n$ weights. Taylor and Zwicker have shown that $d$ is bounded from above by the number of maximal losing coalitions. We present two new upper bounds both containing the Taylor/Zwicker-bound as a special case. The Taylor/Zwicker-bound imply an upper bound of ${n \choose n/2}$. We improve this upper bound significantly by showing constructively that $d$ is bounded from above by the cardinality of any binary covering code with length $n$ and covering radius $1$. This result supplements a recent result where Olsen et al. showed how to construct simple games with dimension $|C|$ for any binary constant weight SECDED code $C$ with length $n$. Our result represents a major step in the attempt to close the dimensionality gap for simple games.
  • Voting is a commonly applied method for the aggregation of the preferences of multiple agents into a joint decision. If preferences are binary, i.e., "yes" and "no", every voting system can be described by a (monotone) Boolean function $\chi\colon\{0,1\}^n\rightarrow \{0,1\}$. However, its naive encoding needs $2^n$ bits. The subclass of threshold functions, which is sufficient for homogeneous agents, allows a more succinct representation using $n$ weights and one threshold. For heterogeneous agents, one can represent $\chi$ as an intersection of $k$ threshold functions. Taylor and Zwicker have constructed a sequence of examples requiring $k\ge 2^{\frac{n}{2}-1}$ and provided a construction guaranteeing $k\le {n\choose {\lfloor n/2\rfloor}}\in 2^{n-o(n)}$. The magnitude of the worst-case situation was thought to be determined by Elkind et al.~in 2008, but the analysis unfortunately turned out to be wrong. Here we uncover a relation to coding theory that allows the determination of the minimum number $k$ for a subclass of voting systems. As an application, we give a construction for $k\ge 2^{n-o(n)}$, i.e., there is no gain from a representation complexity point of view.
  • This paper studies the complexity of computing a representation of a simple game as the intersection (union) of weighted majority games, as well as, the dimension or the codimension. We also present some examples with linear dimension and exponential codimension with respect to the number of players.
  • In this work we consider the problem of maximizing the PageRank of a given target node in a graph by adding $k$ new links. We consider the case that the new links must point to the given target node (backlinks). Previous work shows that this problem has no fully polynomial time approximation schemes unless $P=NP$. We present a polynomial time algorithm yielding a PageRank value within a constant factor from the optimal. We also consider the naive algorithm where we choose backlinks from nodes with high PageRank values compared to the outdegree and show that the naive algorithm performs much worse on certain graphs compared to the constant factor approximation scheme.
  • Using a one-dimensional jellium model and standard beam theory we calculate the spring constant of a vibrating nanowire cantilever. By using the asymptotic energy eigenvalues of the standing electron waves over the nanometer-sized cross-section area, the change in the grand canonical potential is calculated and hence the force and the spring constant. As the wire is bent more electron states fits in its cross section. This has an impact on the spring"constant" which oscillates slightly with the bending of the wire. In this way we obtain an amplitude-dependent resonance frequency of the oscillations that should be detectable.
  • Simple games cover voting systems in which a single alternative, such as a bill or an amendment, is pitted against the status quo. A simple game or a yes-no voting system is a set of rules that specifies exactly which collections of ``yea'' votes yield passage of the issue at hand. A collection of ``yea'' voters forms a winning coalition. We are interested on performing a complexity analysis of problems on such games depending on the game representation. We consider four natural explicit representations, winning, loosing, minimal winning, and maximal loosing. We first analyze the computational complexity of obtaining a particular representation of a simple game from a different one. We show that some cases this transformation can be done in polynomial time while the others require exponential time. The second question is classifying the complexity for testing whether a game is simple or weighted. We show that for the four types of representation both problem can be solved in polynomial time. Finally, we provide results on the complexity of testing whether a simple game or a weighted game is of a special type. In this way, we analyze strongness, properness, decisiveness and homogeneity, which are desirable properties to be fulfilled for a simple game.