• We present the GAMBIT modules SpecBit, DecayBit and PrecisionBit. Together they provide a new framework for linking publicly available spectrum generators, decay codes and other precision observable calculations in a physically and statistically consistent manner. This allows users to automatically run various combinations of existing codes as if they are a single package. The modular design allows software packages fulfilling the same role to be exchanged freely at runtime, with the results presented in a common format that can be easily passed to downstream dark matter, collider and flavour codes. These modules constitute an essential part of the broader GAMBIT framework, a major new software package for performing global fits. In this paper we present the observable calculations, data, and likelihood functions implemented in the three modules, as well as the conventions and assumptions used in interfacing them with external codes. We also present 3-BIT-HIT, a command-line utility for computing mass spectra, couplings, decays and precision observables in the MSSM, which shows how the three modules can be easily used independently of GAMBIT.
  • In the field of automated program repair, the redundancy assumption claims large programs contain the seeds of their own repair. However, most redundancy-based program repair techniques do not reason about the repair ingredients---the code that is reused to craft a patch. We aim to reason about the repair ingredients by using code similarities to prioritize and transform statements in a codebase for patch generation. Our approach, DeepRepair, relies on deep learning to reason about code similarities. Code fragments at well-defined levels of granularity in a codebase can be sorted according to their similarity to suspicious elements (i.e., code elements that contain suspicious statements) and statements can be transformed by mapping out-of-scope identifiers to similar identifiers in scope. We examined these new search strategies for patch generation with respect to effectiveness from the viewpoint of a software maintainer. Our comparative experiments were executed on six open-source Java projects including 374 buggy program revisions and consisted of 19,949 trials spanning 2,616 days of computation time. DeepRepair's search strategy using code similarities generally found compilable ingredients faster than the baseline, jGenProg, but this improvement neither yielded test-adequate patches in fewer attempts (on average) nor found significantly more patches than the baseline. Although the patch counts were not statistically different, there were notable differences between the nature of DeepRepair patches and baseline patches. The results demonstrate that our learning-based approach finds patches that cannot be found by existing redundancy-based repair techniques.
  • We present the most comprehensive global fits to date of three supersymmetric models motivated by grand unification: the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM), and its Non-Universal Higgs Mass generalisations NUHM1 and NUHM2. We include likelihoods from a number of direct and indirect dark matter searches, a large collection of electroweak precision and flavour observables, direct searches for supersymmetry at LEP and Runs I and II of the LHC, and constraints from Higgs observables. Our analysis improves on existing results not only in terms of the number of included observables, but also in the level of detail with which we treat them, our sampling techniques for scanning the parameter space, and our treatment of nuisance parameters. We show that stau co-annihilation is now ruled out in the CMSSM at more than 95\% confidence. Stop co-annihilation turns out to be one of the most promising mechanisms for achieving an appropriate relic density of dark matter in all three models, whilst avoiding all other constraints. We find high-likelihood regions of parameter space featuring light stops and charginos, making them potentially detectable in the near future at the LHC. We also show that tonne-scale direct detection will play a largely complementary role, probing large parts of the remaining viable parameter space, including essentially all models with multi-TeV neutralinos.
  • We study the seven-dimensional Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM7) with the new GAMBIT software framework, with all parameters defined at the weak scale. Our analysis significantly extends previous weak-scale, phenomenological MSSM fits, by adding more and newer experimental analyses, improving the accuracy and detail of theoretical predictions, including dominant uncertainties from the Standard Model, the Galactic dark matter halo and the quark content of the nucleon, and employing novel and highly-efficient statistical sampling methods to scan the parameter space. We find regions of the MSSM7 that exhibit co-annihilation of neutralinos with charginos, stops and sbottoms, as well as models that undergo resonant annihilation via both light and heavy Higgs funnels. We find high-likelihood models with light charginos, stops and sbottoms that have the potential to be within the future reach of the LHC. Large parts of our preferred parameter regions will also be accessible to the next generation of direct and indirect dark matter searches, making prospects for discovery in the near future rather good.
  • One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above $\sim$1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned.
  • Faint star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ can be used as alternative background sources to probe the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in addition to quasars, yielding high sightline densities that enable 3D tomographic reconstruction of the foreground absorption field. Here, we present the first data release from the COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Mapping Observations (CLAMATO) Survey, which was conducted with the LRIS spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. Over an observational footprint of 0.157$\mathrm{deg}^2$ within the COSMOS field, we used 240 galaxies and quasars at $2.17<z<3.00$, with a mean comoving transverse separation of $2.37\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$, as background sources probing the foreground Lyman-$\alpha$ forest absorption at $2.05<z<2.55$. The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data was then used to create a Wiener-filtered tomographic reconstruction over a comoving volume of $3.15\,\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$ with an effective smoothing scale of $2.5\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. In addition to traditional figures, this map is also presented as a virtual-reality YouTube360 video visualization and manipulable interactive figure. We see large overdensities and underdensities that visually agree with the distribution of coeval galaxies from spectroscopic redshift surveys in the same field, including overdensities associated with several recently-discovered galaxy protoclusters in the volume. This data release includes the redshift catalog, reduced spectra, extracted Lyman-$\alpha$ forest pixel data, and tomographic map of the absorption.
  • We present the most distant detection of cosmic voids ($z \sim 2.3$) and the first detection of three-dimensional voids in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest. We used a 3D tomographic map of the absorption with effective comoving spatial resolution of $2.5\,h^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}$ and volume of $3.15\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\mathrm{Mpc}^3$, which was reconstructed from moderate-resolution Keck-I/LRIS spectra of 240 background Lyman-break galaxies and quasars in a $0.16\,\mathrm{deg}^2$ footprint in the COSMOS field. Voids were detected using a spherical overdensity finder calibrated from hydrodynamical simulations of the intergalactic medium. This allows us to identify voids in the IGM corresponding to voids in the underlying matter density field, yielding a consistent volume fraction of voids in both data (19.5%) and simulations (18.2%). We fit excursion set models to the void radius function and compare the radially-averaged stacked profiles of large voids ($r > 5$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc) to stacked voids in mock observations and the simulated density field. Comparing with 432 coeval galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the same volume as the tomographic map, we find that the tomography-identified voids are underdense in galaxies by 5.95$\sigma$ compared to random cells.
  • Recently the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration released the long-waited phase-2 results with a lower energy threshold. It was recently argued that a one-component dark matter explanation of the observed annual modulation is strongly disfavoured or excluded unless isospin-violating couplings are invoked. In this short letter, we make the observation that dark matter comprising both a light and a heavy state can reproduce the observed spectrum without the need to invoke fine-tuned isospin-violating couplings. We perform a fit to scenarios with two-component dark matter and find that they are indeed in excellent agreement with the data. Our results show that two qualitatively different solutions are possible in the simplest case of isospin-conserving couplings with equal cross sections (or energy densities) of the two components. The p-values of the best-fit points of the two-component scenarios are equal, or better than, those of the one-component isospin-violating case. We also find very good agreement in the case of general two-component dark matter models.
  • We study halo assembly bias for cluster-sized halos. Previous work has found little evidence for correlations between large-scale bias and halo mass assembly history for simulated cluster-sized halos, in contrast to the significant correlation found between bias and concentration for halos of this mass. This difference in behavior is surprising, given that both concentration and assembly history are closely related to the same properties of the linear-density peaks that collapse to form halos. Using publicly available simulations, we show that significant assembly bias is indeed found in the most massive halos with $M\sim 10^{15}M_\odot$, using essentially any definition of halo age. For lower halo masses $M\sim 10^{14}M_\odot$, no correlation is found between bias and the commonly used age indicator $a_{0.5}$, the half-mass time. We show that this is a mere accident, and that significant assembly bias exists for other definitions of halo age, including those based on the time when the halo progenitor acquires some fraction $f$ of the ultimate mass at $z=0$. For halos with $M_{\rm vir}\sim 10^{14}M_\odot$, the sense of assembly bias changes sign at $f=0.5$. We explore the origin of this behavior, and argue that it arises because standard definitions of halo mass in halo finders do not correspond to the collapsed, virialized mass that appears in the spherical collapse model used to predict large-scale clustering. Because bias depends strongly on halo mass, these errors in mass definition can masquerade as or even obscure the assembly bias that is physically present. More physically motivated halo definitions using splashback should be free of this particular defect of standard halo finders.
  • The contribution of line-of-sight peculiar velocities to the observed redshift of objects breaks the translational symmetry of the underlying theory, modifying the predicted 2-point functions. These `wide angle effects' have mostly been studied using linear perturbation theory in the context of the multipoles of the correlation function and power spectrum. In this work we present the first calculation of wide angle terms in the Zeldovich approximation, which is known to be more accurate than linear theory on scales probed by the next generation of galaxy surveys. We present the exact result for dark matter and perturbatively biased tracers as well as the small angle expansion of the configuration- and Fourier-space two-point functions and the connection to the multi-frequency angular power spectrum. We compare different definitions of the line-of-sight direction and discuss how to translate between them. We show that wide angle terms can reach tens of percent of the total signal in a measurement at low redshift in some approximations, and that a generic feature of wide angle effects is to slightly shift the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation scale.
  • Redshift space distortions privilege the location of the observer in cosmological redshift surveys, breaking the translational symmetry of the underlying theory. This violation of statistical homogeneity has consequences for the modeling of clustering observables, leading to what are frequently called `wide angle effects'. We study these effects analytically, computing their signature in the clustering of the multipoles in configuration and Fourier space. We take into account both physical wide angle contributions as well as the terms generated by the galaxy selection function. Similar considerations also affect the way power spectrum estimators are constructed. We quantify, in an analytical way the biases which enter and clarify the relation between what we measure and the underlying theoretical modeling. The presence of an angular window function is also discussed. Motivated by this analysis we present new estimators for the three dimensional Cartesian power spectrum and bispectrum multipoles written in terms of spherical Fourier-Bessel coefficients. We show how the latter have several interesting properties, allowing in particular a clear separation between angular and radial modes.
  • GUI-based models extracted from Android app execution traces, events, or source code can be extremely useful for challenging tasks such as the generation of scenarios or test cases. However, extracting effective models can be an expensive process. Moreover, existing approaches for automatically deriving GUI-based models are not able to generate scenarios that include events which were not observed in execution (nor event) traces. In this paper, we address these and other major challenges in our novel hybrid approach, coined as MonkeyLab. Our approach is based on the Record-Mine-Generate-Validate framework, which relies on recording app usages that yield execution (event) traces, mining those event traces and generating execution scenarios using statistical language modeling, static and dynamic analyses, and validating the resulting scenarios using an interactive execution of the app on a real device. The framework aims at mining models capable of generating feasible and fully replayable (i.e., actionable) scenarios reflecting either natural user behavior or uncommon usages (e.g., corner cases) for a given app. We evaluated MONKEYLAB in a case study involving several medium-to-large open-source Android apps. Our results demonstrate that MonkeyLab is able to mine GUI-based models that can be used to generate actionable execution scenarios for both natural and unnatural sequences of events on Google Nexus 7 tablets.
  • We present an anisotropic analysis of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal from the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) Data Release 14 (DR14) quasar sample. The sample consists of 147,000 quasars distributed over a redshift range of $0.8 < z < 2.2$. We apply the redshift weights technique to the clustering of quasars in this sample and achieve a 4.6 per cent measurement of the angular distance measurement $D_M$ at $z = 2.2$ and Hubble parameter $H$ at $z=0.8$. We parameterize the distance-redshift relation, relative to a fiducial model, as a quadratic expansion. The coefficients of this expansion are used to reconstruct the distance-redshift relation and obtain distance and Hubble parameter measurements at all redshifts within the redshift range of the sample. Reporting the result at two characteristic redshifts, we determine $D_M(z=1) = 3405\pm305 \ (r_{\rm d} / r_{\rm d, fid}) \ {\rm Mpc}$, $H(z=1) = 120.7\pm 7.3 \ (r_{\rm d,fid} / r_{\rm d}) \ {\rm km} \ {\rm s}^{-1}{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ and $D_M(z=2) = 5325\pm249 \ (r_{\rm d} / r_{\rm d, fid}) \ {\rm Mpc}$, $H(z=2) = 189.9\pm 32.9 \ (r_{\rm d,fid} / r_{\rm d}) \ {\rm km} \ {\rm s}^{-1}{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. These measurements are highly correlated. We assess the outlook of BAO analysis from the final quasar sample by testing the method on a set of mocks that mimic the noise level in the final sample. We demonstrate on these mocks that redshift weighting shrinks the measurement error by over 25 per cent on average. We conclude redshift weighting can bring us closer to the cosmological goal of the final quasar sample.
  • We introduce DarkBit, an advanced software code for computing dark matter constraints on various extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, comprising both new native code and interfaces to external packages. This release includes a dedicated signal yield calculator for gamma-ray observations, which significantly extends current tools by implementing a cascade decay Monte Carlo, as well as a dedicated likelihood calculator for current and future experiments (gamlike). This provides a general solution for studying complex particle physics models that predict dark matter annihilation to a multitude of final states. We also supply a direct detection package that models a large range of direct detection experiments (DDcalc), and provides the corresponding likelihoods for arbitrary combinations of spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering processes. Finally, we provide custom relic density routines along with interfaces to DarkSUSY, micrOMEGAs, and the neutrino telescope likelihood package nuLike. DarkBit is written in the framework of the Global And Modular Beyond the Standard Model Inference Tool (GAMBIT), providing seamless integration into a comprehensive statistical fitting framework that allows users to explore new models with both particle and astrophysics constraints, and a consistent treatment of systematic uncertainties. In this paper we describe its main functionality, provide a guide to getting started quickly, and show illustrative examples for results obtained with DarkBit (both as a standalone tool and as a GAMBIT module). This includes a quantitative comparison between two of the main dark matter codes (DarkSUSY and micrOMEGAs), and application of DarkBit's advanced direct and indirect detection routines to a simple effective dark matter model.
  • We describe the open-source global fitting package GAMBIT: the Global And Modular Beyond-the-Standard-Model Inference Tool. GAMBIT combines extensive calculations of observables and likelihoods in particle and astroparticle physics with a hierarchical model database, advanced tools for automatically building analyses of essentially any model, a flexible and powerful system for interfacing to external codes, a suite of different statistical methods and parameter scanning algorithms, and a host of other utilities designed to make scans faster, safer and more easily-extendible than in the past. Here we give a detailed description of the framework, its design and motivation, and the current models and other specific components presently implemented in GAMBIT. Accompanying papers deal with individual modules and present first GAMBIT results. GAMBIT can be downloaded from gambit.hepforge.org.
  • We study the case of multi-component dark matter, in particular how direct detection signals are modified in the presence of several stable weakly-interacting-massive particles. Assuming a positive signal in a future direct detection experiment, stemming from two dark matter components, we study the region in parameter space where it is possible to distinguish a one from a two-component dark matter spectrum. First, we leave as free parameters the two dark matter masses and show that the two hypotheses can be significantly discriminated for a range of dark matter masses with their splitting being the critical factor. We then investigate how including the effects of different interaction strengths, local densities or velocity dispersions for the two components modifies these conclusions. We also consider the case of isospin-violating couplings. In all scenarios, we show results for various types of nuclei both for elastic spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions. Finally, assuming that the two-component hypothesis is confirmed, we quantify the accuracy with which the parameters can be extracted and discuss the different degeneracies that occur. This includes studying the case in which only a single experiment observes a signal, and also the scenario of having two signals from two different experiments, in which case the ratios of the couplings to neutrons and protons may also be extracted.
  • We analyse a simple extension of the SM with just an additional scalar singlet coupled to the Higgs boson. We discuss the possible probes for electroweak baryogenesis in this model including collider searches, gravitational wave and direct dark matter detection signals. We show that a large portion of the model parameter space exists where the observation of gravitational waves would allow detection while the indirect collider searches would not.
  • A new generation of interferometric instruments is emerging which aim to use intensity mapping of redshifted $21\,$cm radiation to measure the large-scale structure of the Universe at $z\simeq 1-2$ over wide areas of sky. While these instruments typically have limited angular resolution, they cover huge volumes and thus can be used to provide large samples of rare objects. In this paper we study how well such instruments could find spatially extended large-scale structures, such as cosmic voids, using a matched filter formalism. Such a formalism allows us to work in Fourier space, the natural space for interferometers, and to study the impact of finite $u-v$ coverage, noise and foregrounds on our ability to recover voids. We find that in the absence of foregrounds such instruments would provide enormous catalogs of voids, with high completeness, but that control of foregrounds is key to realizing this goal.
  • A new generation of surveys will soon map large fractions of sky to ever greater depths and their science goals can be enhanced by exploiting cross correlations between them. In this paper we study cross correlations between the lensing of the CMB and biased tracers of large-scale structure at high $z$. We motivate the need for more sophisticated bias models for modeling increasingly biased tracers at these redshifts and propose the use of perturbation theories, specifically Convolution Lagrangian Effective Field Theory ({\sc CLEFT}). Since such signals reside at large scales and redshifts, they can be well described by perturbative approaches. We compare our model with the current approach of using scale independent bias coupled with fitting functions for non-linear matter power spectra, showing that the latter will not be sufficient for upcoming surveys. We illustrate our ideas by estimating $\sigma_8$ from the auto- and cross-spectra of mock surveys, finding that {\sc CLEFT} returns accurate and unbiased results at high $z$. We discuss uncertainties due to the redshift distribution of the tracers, and several avenues for future development.
  • Our Galaxy hosts the annihilation of a few $\times 10^{43}$ low-energy positrons every second. Radioactive isotopes capable of supplying such positrons are synthesised in stars, stellar remnants, and supernovae. For decades, however, there has been no positive identification of a main stellar positron source leading to suggestions that many positrons originate from exotic sources like the Galaxy's central super-massive black hole or dark matter annihilation. %, but such sources would not explain the recently-detected positron signal from the extended Galactic disk. Here we show that a single type of transient source, deriving from stellar populations of age 3-6 Gyr and yielding ~0.03 $M_\odot$ of the positron emitter $^{44}$Ti, can simultaneously explain the strength and morphology of the Galactic positron annihilation signal and the solar system abundance of the $^{44}$Ti decay product $^{44}$Ca. This transient is likely the merger of two low-mass white dwarfs, observed in external galaxies as the sub-luminous, thermonuclear supernova known as SN1991bg-like.
  • We describe ColliderBit, a new code for the calculation of high energy collider observables in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). ColliderBit features a generic interface to BSM models, a unique parallelised Monte Carlo event generation scheme suitable for large-scale supercomputer applications, and a number of LHC analyses, covering a reasonable range of the BSM signatures currently sought by ATLAS and CMS. ColliderBit also calculates likelihoods for Higgs sector observables, and LEP searches for BSM particles. These features are provided by a combination of new code unique to ColliderBit, and interfaces to existing state-of-the-art public codes. ColliderBit is both an important part of the GAMBIT framework for BSM inference, and a standalone tool for efficiently applying collider constraints to theories of new physics.
  • We study the first year of the eBOSS quasar sample in the redshift range $0.9<z<2.2$ which includes 68,772 homogeneously selected quasars. We show that the main source of systematics in the evaluation of the correlation function arises from inhomogeneities in the quasar target selection, particularly related to the extinction and depth of the imaging data used for targeting. We propose a weighting scheme that mitigates these systematics. We measure the quasar correlation function and provide the most accurate measurement to date of the quasar bias in this redshift range, $b_Q = 2.45 \pm 0.05$ at $\bar z=1.55$, together with its evolution with redshift. We use this information to determine the minimum mass of the halo hosting the quasars and the characteristic halo mass, which we find to be both independent of redshift within statistical error. Using a recently-measured quasar-luminosity-function we also determine the quasar duty cycle. The size of this first year sample is insufficient to detect any luminosity dependence to quasar clustering and this issue should be further studied with the final $\sim$500,000 eBOSS quasar sample.
  • The distribution of diffuse gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM) imprints a series of hydrogen absorption lines on the spectra of distant background quasars known as the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations predict that IGM density fluctuations are suppressed below a characteristic scale where thermal pressure balances gravity. We measured this pressure-smoothing scale by quantifying absorption correlations in a sample of close quasar pairs. We compared our measurements to hydrodynamical simulations, where pressure smoothing is determined by the integrated thermal history of the IGM. Our findings are consistent with standard models for photoionization heating by the ultraviolet radiation backgrounds that reionized the universe.
  • We present a measurement of the linear growth rate of structure, \textit{f} from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) using Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) with Gaussian Streaming Redshift-Space Distortions (GSRSD) to model the two point statistics of BOSS galaxies in DR12. The BOSS-DR12 dataset includes 1,198,006 massive galaxies spread over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$. These galaxy samples are categorized in three redshift bins. Using CLPT-GSRSD in our analysis of the combined sample of the three redshift bins, we report measurements of $f \sigma_8$ for the three redshift bins. We find $f \sigma_8 = 0.430 \pm 0.054$ at $z_{\rm eff} = 0.38$, $f \sigma_8 = 0.452 \pm 0.057$ at $z_{\rm eff} = 0.51$ and $f \sigma_8 = 0.457 \pm 0.052$ at $z_{\rm eff} = 0.61$. Our results are consistent with the predictions of Planck $\Lambda$CDM-GR. Our constraints on the growth rates of structure in the Universe at different redshifts serve as a useful probe, which can help distinguish between a model of the Universe based on dark energy and models based on modified theories of gravity. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. 2016 to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.
  • Minimal Composite Higgs Models (MCHM) have long provided a solution to the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model, yet suffer from various sources of fine tuning that are becoming increasingly problematic with the lack of new physics observations at the LHC. We develop a new fine tuning measure that accurately counts each contribution to fine tuning (single, double, triple, etc) that can occur in a theory with $n_p$ parameters, that must reproduce $n_o$ observables. We then use a novel scanning procedure to perform a comprehensive study of three different two-site, 4D, $SO(5)\rightarrow SO(4)$ MCHMs with all third generation fermions included, distinguished by the choice of the lepton embeddings. These are the MCHM$^{\textbf{5-5-5}}_{\textbf{5-5-5}}$, MCHM$^{\textbf{5-5-5}}_{\textbf{14-14-10}}$ and MCHM$^{\textbf{5-5-5}}_{\textbf{14-1-10}}$, where MCHM$^{q-t-b}_{l-\tau-\nu}$ has the lepton doublet partner in representation $l$, tau partner in representation $\tau$, and so on. We find that embedding at least one massive lepton in the symmetric $\textbf{14}$ of $SO(5)$ reduces the tuning for the case of low top partner masses (in line with previous results), but that this is balanced against the increased complexity of the model when one properly accounts for all sources of fine tuning. We study both the current relative fine-tuning of each scenario, and the future prospects. Noting that the different scenarios behave differently with respect to future improvements in collider measurements, we find that the MCHM$^{\textbf{5-5-5}}_{\textbf{14-1-10}}$ enjoys a relatively low increase in fine tuning even for a future lower bound on the top partner masses of 3.4 TeV (or equivalently a maximum Higgs-fermion or Higgs-gluon coupling deviation of 2%).