• The gamma-ray-detected blazar 3C 454.3 exhibits dramatic flux and polarization variations in the optical and near-infrared bands. In December 2010, the object emitted a very bright outburst. We monitored it for approximately four years (including the 2010 outburst) by optical and near-infrared photopolarimetry. During the 2010 outburst, the object emitted two rapid, redder brightenings, at which the polarization degrees (PDs) in both bands increased significantly and the bands exhibited a frequency-dependent polarization. The observed frequency-dependent polarization leads us to propose that the polarization vector is composed of two vectors. Therefore, we separate the observed polarization vectors into short and long-term components that we attribute to the emissions of the rapid brightenings and the outburst that varied the timescale of days and months, respectively. The estimated PD of the short-term component is greater than the maximum observed PD and is close to the theoretical maximum PD. We constrain the bulk Lorentz factors and inclination angles between the jet axis and the line of sight from the estimated PDs. In this case, the inclination angle of the emitting region of short-term component from the first rapid brightening should be equal to 90$^{\circ}$, because the estimated PD of the short-term component was approximately equal to the theoretical maximum PD. Thus, the Doppler factor at the emitting region of the first rapid brightening should be equal to the bulk Lorentz factor.
  • 3C 66A is an intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lac object detected by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present a study of the long-term variations of this blazar seen over 2 years at GeV energies with Fermi and in the optical (flux and polarization) and near infrared with the Kanata telescope. In 2008, the first year of the study, we find a correlation between the gamma-ray flux and the measurements taken with the Kanata telescope. This is in contrast to the later measurements performed during 2009--2010 which show only a weak correlation along with a gradual increase of the optical flux. We calculate an external seed photon energy density assuming that the gamma-ray emission is due to external Compton scattering. The energy density of the external photons is found to be higher by a factor of two in 2008 compared to 2009--2010. We conclude that the different behaviors observed between the first year and the later years might be explained by postulating two different emission components.
  • In December 2009, the bright blazar, 3C 454.3 exhibited a strong outburst in the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray regions. We performed photometric and polarimetric monitoring of this outburst in the optical and near-infrared bands with TRISPEC and HOWPol attached to the Kanata telescope. We also observed this outburst in the infrared band with AKARI, and the radio band with the 32-m radio telescope of Yamaguchi University. The object was in an active state from JD 2455055 to 2455159. It was 1.3 mag brighter than its quiescent state before JD 2455055 in the optical band. After the end of the active state in JD 2455159, a prominent outburst was observed in all wavelengths. The outburst continued for two months. Our optical and nearinfrared polarimetric observations revealed that the position angle of the polarization (PA) apparently rotated clockwise by 240 degrees within 11 d in the active state (JD 2455063-2455074), and after this rotation, PA remained almost constant during our monitoring. In the outburst state, PA smoothly rotated counterclockwise by 350 degrees within 35 d (JD 2455157-2455192). Thus, we detected two distinct rotation events of polarization vector in opposite directions. We discuss these two events compared with the past rotation events observed in 2005, 2007 and 2008.
  • We report on the correlation between the flux, color and polarization variations on time scales of days--months in blazars, and discuss their universal aspects. We performed monitoring of 42 blazars in the optical and near-infrared bands from 2008 to 2010 using TRISPEC attached to the "Kanata" 1.5-m telescope. We found that 28 blazars exhibited "bluer-when-brighter" trends in their whole or a part of time-series data sets. This corresponds to 88% of objects that were observed for >10 days. Thus, our observation unambiguously confirmed that the "bluer-when-brighter" trend is common in the emission from blazar jets. This trend was apparently generated by a variation component with a constant and relatively blue color and an underlying red component. Prominent short-term flares on time scales of days--weeks tended to exhibit a spectral hysteresis; their rising phases were bluer than their decay phases around the flare maxima. In contrast to the strong flux--color correlation, the correlation of the flux and polarization degree was relatively weak; only 10 objects showed significant positive correlations. Rotations of polarization were detected only in three objects: PKS 1510-089, 3C 454.3, and PKS 1749+096, and possibly in S5 0716+714. We also investigated the dependence of the degree of variability on the luminosity and the synchrotron peak frequency, \nu_peak. As a result, we found that lower luminosity and higher \nu_peak objects had smaller variations in their amplitudes both in the flux, color, and polarization degree. Our observation suggests the presence of several distinct emitting sources, which have different variation time-scales, colors, and polarizations. We propose that the energy injection by, for example, internal shocks in relativistic shells is a major factor for blazar variations on time scales of both days and months.
  • We report on multi-band photometric and polarimetric observations of the blazars AO 0235+164 and PKS 1510-089. These two blazars were active in 2008 and 2009, respectively. In these active states, prominent short flares were observed in both objects, having amplitudes of >1 mag within 10 d. The $V-J$ color became bluer when the objects were brighter in these flares. On the other hand, the color of PKS 1510-089 exhibited a trend that it became redder when it was brighter, except for its prominent flare. This redder-when-brighter trend can be explained by the strong contribution of thermal emission from an accretion disk. The polarization degree increased at the flares, and reached >25 % at the maxima. We compare these flares in AO 0235+164 and PKS 1510-089 with other short flares which were detected by our monitoring of 41 blazars. Those two flares had one of the largest variation amplitudes in both flux and polarization degree. Furthermore, we found a significant positive correlation between the amplitudes of the flux and polarization degree in the short flares. It indicates that the short flares originate from the region where the magnetic field is aligned.
  • We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of a classical nova, V2362 Cyg (= Nova Cygni 2006). V2362 Cyg experienced a peculiar rebrightening with a long duration from 100 to 240 d after the maximum of the nova. Our multicolor observation indicates an emergence of a pseudophotosphere with an effective temperature of 9000 K at the rebrightening maximum. After the rebrightening maximum, the object showed a slow fading homogeneously in all of the used bands for one week. This implies that the fading just after the rebrightening maximum ( less or equal 1 week ) was caused by a slowly shrinking pseudophotosphere. Then, the NIR flux drastically increased, while the optical flux steeply declined. The optical and NIR flux was consistent with blackbody radiation with a temperature of 1500 K during this NIR rising phase. These facts are likely to be explained by dust formation in the nova ejecta. Assuming an optically thin case, we estimate the dust mass of 10^(-8) -- 10^(-10) M_solar, which is less than those in typical dust-forming novae. These results support the senario that a second, long-lasting outflow, which caused the rebrightening, interacted with a fraction of the initial outflow and formed dust grains.
  • We report on optical-near-infrared photopolarimetric observations of a blazar 3C 454.3 over 200 d. The object experienced an optical outburst in July 2007. This outburst was followed by a short state fainter than $V=15.2$ mag lasting $\sim 25$ d. The object, then, entered an active state during which we observed short flares having a timescale of 3-10 d. The object showed two types of features in the color-magnitude relationship. One is a "bluer-when-brighter" trend in the outburst state, and the other is a "redder-when-brighter" trend in the faint state. These two types of features suggest a contribution of a thermal emission to the observed flux, as suspected in previous studies. Our polarimetric observation detected two episodes of the rotation of the polarization vector. The first one was a counterclockwise rotation in the $QU$ plane during the outburst state. After this rotation event of the polarization vector, the object entered a rapidly fading stage. The second one was seen in a series of flares during the active state. Each flare had a specific position angle of polarization, and it apparently rotated clockwise from the first to the last flares. Thus, the object exhibited rotations of the polarization vector in opposite directions. We estimated a decay timescale of the short flares during the active state, and then calculated an upper limit of the strength of the magnetic field, $B$=0.2 G, assuming a typical beaming factor of blazars, $\delta=20$. This upper limit of $B$ is smaller than those previously estimated from spectral analysis.
  • We report the observation of a new dwarf nova, OT J055717+683226, during its first-ever recorded superoutburst in December 2006. Our observation shows that this object is an SU UMa-type dwarf nova having a very short superhump period of 76.67+/- 0.03 min (0.05324+/-0.00002 d). The next superoutburst was observed in March 2008. The recurrence time of superoutbursts (supercycle) is, hence, estimated to be ~480 d. The supercycle is much shorter than those of WZ Sge-type dwarf novae having supercycles of >~ 10 yr, which are a major population of dwarf novae in the shortest orbital period regime (<~85 min). Using a hierarchical cluster analysis, we identified seven groups of dwarf novae in the shortest orbital period regime. We identified a small group of objects that have short supercycles, small outburst amplitudes, and large superhump period excesses, compared with those of WZ Sge stars. OT J055717+683226 probably belongs to this group.
  • We developed a method to separate a long-term trend from observed temporal variations of polarization in blazars using a Bayesian approach. The temporal variation of the polarization vector is apparently erratic in most blazars, while several objects occasionally exhibited systematic variations, for example, an increase of the polarization degree associated with a flare of the total flux. We assume that the observed polarization vector is a superposition of distinct two components, a long-term trend and a short-term variation component responsible for short flares. Our Bayesian model estimates the long-term trend which satisfies the condition that the total flux correlates with the polarized flux of the short-term component. We demonstrate that assumed long-term polarization components are successfully separated by the Bayesian model for artificial data. We applied this method to photopolarimetric data of OJ 287, S5 0716+714, and S2 0109+224. Simple and systematic long-term trends were obtained in OJ 287 and S2 0109+224, while no such a trend was identified in S5 0716+714. We propose that the apparently erratic variations of polarization in OJ 287 and S2 0109+224 are due to the presence of the long-term polarization component. The behavior of polarization in S5 0716+714 during our observation period implies the presence of a number of polarization components having a quite short time-scale of variations.
  • We report detailed, long term near-infrared (NIR) light curves of GRS 1915+105 in 2007-2008, covering its long "soft state" for the first time. From our NIR monitoring and the X-ray data of the All Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we discovered that the NIR flux dropped by > 1 mag during short X-ray flares with a time-scale of days. With the termination of the soft state, the H-Ks color reddened and the anti-correlation pattern was broken. The observed H-Ks color variation suggests that the dominant NIR source was an accretion disk during the soft state. The short X-ray flares during the soft state were associated with spectral hardening in X-rays and increasing radio emission indicating jet ejection. The temporal NIR fading during the X-ray flares, hence, implies a sudden decrease of the contribution of the accretion disk when the jet is ejected.
  • We report time-resolved CCD photometry of the cataclysmic variable EG Aquarii during the 2006 November outburst During the outburst, superhumps were unambiguously detected with a mean period of 0.078828(6) days, firstly classifying the object as an SU UMa-type dwarf nova. It also turned out that the outburst contained a precursor. At the end of the precursor, immature profiles of humps were observed. By a phase analysis of these humps, we interpreted the features as superhumps. This is the second example that the superhumps were shown during a precursor. Near the maximum stage of the outburst, we discovered an abrupt shift of the superhump period by ${\sim}$ 0.002 days. After the supermaximum, the superhump period decreased at the rate of $\dot{P}/P$=$-8.2{\times}10^{-5}$, which is typical for SU UMa-type dwarf novae. Although the outburst light curve was characteristic of SU UMa-type dwarf novae, long-term monitoring of the variable shows no outbursts over the past decade. We note on the basic properties of long period and inactive SU UMa-type dwarf novae.