• The spread of opinions, memes, diseases, and "alternative facts" in a population depends both on the details of the spreading process and on the structure of the social and communication networks on which they spread. In this paper, we explore how \textit{anti-establishment} nodes (e.g., \textit{hipsters}) influence the spreading dynamics of two competing products. We consider a model in which spreading follows a deterministic rule for updating node states (which describe which product has been adopted) in which an adjustable fraction $p_{\rm Hip}$ of the nodes in a network are hipsters, who choose to adopt the product that they believe is the less popular of the two. The remaining nodes are conformists, who choose which product to adopt by considering which products their immediate neighbors have adopted. We simulate our model on both synthetic and real networks, and we show that the hipsters have a major effect on the final fraction of people who adopt each product: even when only one of the two products exists at the beginning of the simulations, a very small fraction of hipsters in a network can still cause the other product to eventually become the more popular one. To account for this behavior, we construct an approximation for the steady-state adoption fraction on $k$-regular trees in the limit of few hipsters. Additionally, our simulations demonstrate that a time delay $\tau$ in the knowledge of the product distribution in a population, as compared to immediate knowledge of product adoption among nearest neighbors, can have a large effect on the final distribution of product adoptions. Our simple model and analysis may help shed light on the road to success for anti-establishment choices in elections, as such success can arise rather generically in our model from a small number of anti-establishment individuals and ordinary processes of social influence on normal individuals.
  • We study asymptotic solutions to a singularly-perturbed, period-2 Toda lattice and use exponential asymptotics to examine `nanoptera', which are nonlocal solitary waves with constant-amplitude, exponentially small wave trains. With this approach, we isolate the exponentially small, constant-amplitude waves, and we elucidate the dynamics of these waves in terms of the Stokes phenomenon. We find a simple asymptotic expression for the waves, and we study configurations in which these waves vanish, producing localized solitary-wave solutions. In the limit of small mass ratio, we derive a simple anti-resonance condition for the manifestation these wave-free solutions.
  • Many problems in industry --- and in the social, natural, information, and medical sciences --- involve discrete data and benefit from approaches from subjects such as network science, information theory, optimization, probability, and statistics. The study of networks is concerned explicitly with connectivity between different entities, and it has become very prominent in industrial settings, an importance that has intensified amidst the modern data deluge. In this commentary, we discuss the role of network analysis in industrial and applied mathematics, and we give several examples of network science in industry. We focus, in particular, on discussing a physical-applied-mathematics approach to the study of networks. We also discuss several of our own collaborations with industry on projects in network analysis.
  • Network theory provides a useful framework for studying interconnected systems of interacting agents. Many networked systems evolve continuously in time, but most existing methods for analyzing time-dependent networks rely on discrete or discretized time. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for studying networks that evolve in continuous time by distinguishing between interactions, which we model as discrete contacts, and \emph{ties}, which represent strengths of relationships as functions of time. To illustrate our framework of tie-decay networks, we show how to examine --- in a mathematically tractable and computationally efficient way --- important (i.e., 'central') nodes in networks in which tie strengths decay in time after individuals interact. As a concrete illustration, we introduce a continuous-time generalization of PageRank centrality and apply it to a network of retweets during the 2012 National Health Service controversy in the United Kingdom. Our work also provides guidance for similar generalizations of other tools from network theory to continuous-time networks with tie decay, including for applications to streaming data.
  • Network analysis has driven key developments in animal behavior research by providing quantitative methods to study the social structures of animal groups and populations. A recent advancement in network science, \emph{multilayer network analysis}, the study of network structures of multiple interconnected 'layers' and associated dynamical processes, offers a novel way to represent and analyze animal behavior. It also helps strengthen the links between animal social behavior and broader ecological and evolutionary contexts and processes. In this article, we describe how to encode animal behavior data as different types of multilayer networks, and we link recently-developed multilayer methods to individual-, group-, population-, and evolutionary-level questions in behavioral ecology. We outline a variety of examples for how to apply multilayer methods in behavioral ecology research, including examples that demonstrate how taking a multilayer approach can alter inferences about social structure and the positions of individuals within such a structure. These new insights have consequences for ecological processes such as disease transmission. We also discuss caveats to undertaking multilayer network analysis in the study of animal social networks, and we outline methodological challenges for the application of these approaches. Multilayer network analysis offers a promising approach for tackling classical research questions from a new perspective, and it opens a plethora of new questions that have thus far been out of reach.
  • We study continuum percolation with disks, a variant of continuum percolation in two-dimensional Euclidean space, by applying tools from topological data analysis. We interpret each realization of continuum percolation with disks as a topological subspace of $[0,1]^2$ and investigate its topological features across many realizations. We apply persistent homology to investigate topological changes as we vary the number and radius of disks. We observe evidence that the longest persisting invariant is born at or near the percolation transition.
  • In 1955, Fermi, Pasta, Ulam, and Tsingou reported recurrence over time of energy between modes in a one-dimensional array of nonlinear oscillators. Subsequently, there have been myriad numerical experiments using homogenous FPUT arrays, which consist of chains of ideal, nonlinearly-coupled oscillators. However, inherent variations --- e.g., due to manufacturing tolerance --- introduce heterogeneity into the parameters of any physical system. We demonstrate that such tolerances degrade the observance of recurrence, often leading to complete loss in moderately sized arrays. We numerically simulate heterogeneous FPUT systems to investigate the effects of tolerances on dynamics. Our results illustrate that tolerances in real nonlinear oscillator arrays may limit the applicability of results from numerical experiments on them to physical systems, unless appropriate heterogeneities are taken into account.
  • Characterizing large-scale organization in networks, including multilayer networks, is one of the most prominent topics in network science and is important for many applications. One type of mesoscale feature is community structure, in which sets of nodes are densely connected internally but sparsely connected to other dense sets of nodes. Two of the most popular approaches for community detection are maximizing an objective function called "modularity" and performing statistical inference using stochastic block models. Generalizing work by Newman on monolayer networks (Physical Review E 94, 052315), we show in multilayer networks that maximizing modularity is equivalent, under certain conditions, to maximizing the posterior probability of community assignments under suitably chosen stochastic block models. We derive versions of this equivalence for various types of multilayer structure, including temporal, multiplex, and multilevel (i.e., hierarchical) networks. We consider cases in which the key parameters are constant as well as ones in which they vary across layers; in the latter case, this yields a novel, layer-weighted version of the modularity function. Our results also help address a longstanding difficulty of multilayer modularity-maximization algorithms, which require the specification of two sets of tuning parameters that have been difficult to choose in practice. We show how to perform this parameter selection in a statistically-grounded way, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several multilayer network benchmarks. Finally, we apply our method to empirical data to identify multilayer communities without having to tune parameters.
  • We study quasiperiodicity-induced localization of waves in strongly precompressed granular chains. We propose three different setups, inspired by the Aubry--Andr\'e (AA) model, of quasiperiodic chains; and we use these models to compare the effects of on-site and off-site quasiperiodicity in nonlinear lattices. When there is purely on-site quasiperiodicity, which we implement in two different ways, we show for a chain of spherical particles that there is a localization transition (as in the original AA model). However, we observe no localization transition in a chain of cylindrical particles in which we incorporate quasiperiodicity in the distribution of contact angles between adjacent cylinders by making the angle periodicity incommensurate with that of the chain. For each of our three models, we compute the Hofstadter spectrum and the associated Minkowski--Bouligand fractal dimension, and we demonstrate that the fractal dimension decreases as one approaches the localization transition (when it exists). Finally, in a suite of numerical computations, we demonstrate both localization and that there exist regimes of ballistic, superdiffusive, diffusive, and subdiffusive transport. Our models provide a flexible set of systems to study quasiperiodicity-induced analogs of Anderson phenomena in granular chains that one can tune controllably from weakly to strongly nonlinear regimes.
  • We study - experimentally, theoretically, and numerically - nonlinear excitations in lattices of magnets with long-range interactions. We examine breather solutions, which are spatially localized and periodic in time, in a chain with algebraically-decaying interactions. It was established two decades ago [S. Flach, Phys. Rev. E 58, R4116 (1998)] that lattices with long-range interactions can have breather solutions in which the spatial decay of the tails has a crossover from exponential to algebraic decay. In this Letter, we revisit this problem in the setting of a chain of repelling magnets with a mass defect and verify, both numerically and experimentally, the existence of breathers with such a crossover.
  • Networks are a convenient way to represent complex systems of interacting entities. Many networks contain "communities" of nodes that are more densely connected to each other than to nodes in the rest of the network. In this paper, we investigate the detection of communities in temporal networks represented as multilayer networks. As a focal example, we study time-dependent financial-asset correlation networks. We first argue that the use of the "modularity" quality function---which is defined by comparing edge weights in an observed network to expected edge weights in a "null network"---is application-dependent. We differentiate between "null networks" and "null models" in our discussion of modularity maximization, and we highlight that the same null network can correspond to different null models. We then investigate a multilayer modularity-maximization problem to identify communities in temporal networks. Our multilayer analysis only depends on the form of the maximization problem and not on the specific quality function that one chooses. We introduce a diagnostic to measure \emph{persistence} of community structure in a multilayer network partition. We prove several results that describe how the multilayer maximization problem measures a trade-off between static community structure within layers and larger values of persistence across layers. We also discuss some computational issues that the popular "Louvain" heuristic faces with temporal multilayer networks and suggest ways to mitigate them.
  • We construct two ordinary-differential-equation models of a predator feeding adaptively on two prey types, and we evaluate the models' ability to fit data on freshwater plankton. We model the predator's switch from one prey to the other in two different ways: (1) smooth switching using a hyperbolic tangent function; and (2) by incorporating a parameter that changes abruptly across the switching boundary as a system variable that is coupled to the population dynamics. We conduct linear stability analyses, use approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) combined with a population Monte Carlo (PMC) method to fit model parameters, and compare model predictions quantitatively to data for ciliate predators and their two algal prey groups collected from Lake Constance on the German--Swiss--Austrian border. We show that the two models fit the data well when the smooth transition is steep, supporting the simplifying assumption of a discontinuous prey switching behavior for this scenario. We thus conclude that prey switching is a possible mechanistic explanation for the observed ciliate--algae dynamics in Lake Constance in spring, but that these data cannot distinguish between the details of prey switching that are encoded in these different models.
  • The arrangements of particles and forces in granular materials have a complex organization on multiple spatial scales that ranges from local structures to mesoscale and system-wide ones. This multiscale organization can affect how a material responds or reconfigures when exposed to external perturbations or loading. The theoretical study of particle-level, force-chain, domain, and bulk properties requires the development and application of appropriate physical, mathematical, statistical, and computational frameworks. Traditionally, granular materials have been investigated using particulate or continuum models, each of which tends to be implicitly agnostic to multiscale organization. Recently, tools from network science have emerged as powerful approaches for probing and characterizing heterogeneous architectures across different scales in complex systems, and a diverse set of methods have yielded fascinating insights into granular materials. In this paper, we review work on network-based approaches to studying granular matter and explore the potential of such frameworks to provide a useful description of these systems and to enhance understanding of their underlying physics. We also outline a few open questions and highlight particularly promising future directions in the analysis and design of granular matter and other kinds of material networks.
  • A counterparty credit limit (CCL) is a limit imposed by a financial institution to cap its maximum possible exposure to a specified counterparty. Although CCLs are designed to help institutions mitigate counterparty risk by selective diversification of their exposures, their implementation restricts the liquidity that institutions can access in an otherwise centralized pool. We address the question of how this mechanism impacts trade prices and volatility, both empirically and via a new model of trading with CCLs. We find empirically that CCLs cause little impact on trade. However, our model highlights that in extreme situations, CCLs could serve to destabilize prices and thereby influence systemic risk.
  • We explore how to study dynamical interactions between brain regions using functional multilayer networks whose layers represent the different frequency bands at which a brain operates. Specifically, we investigate the consequences of considering the brain as a multilayer network in which all brain regions can interact with each other at different frequency bands, instead of as a multiplex network, in which interactions between different frequency bands are only allowed within each brain region and not between them. We study the second smallest eigenvalue of the combinatorial supra-Laplacian matrix of the multilayer network in detail, and we thereby show that the heterogeneity of interlayer edges and, especially, the fraction of missing edges crucially modify the spectral properties of the multilayer network. We illustrate our results with both synthetic network models and real data sets obtained from resting state magnetoencephalography. Our work demonstrates an important issue in the construction of frequency-based multilayer brain networks.
  • Persistent homology (PH) is a method used in topological data analysis (TDA) to study qualitative features of data that persist across multiple scales. It is robust to perturbations of input data, independent of dimensions and coordinates, and provides a compact representation of the qualitative features of the input. The computation of PH is an open area with numerous important and fascinating challenges. The field of PH computation is evolving rapidly, and new algorithms and software implementations are being updated and released at a rapid pace. The purposes of our article are to (1) introduce theory and computational methods for PH to a broad range of computational scientists and (2) provide benchmarks of state-of-the-art implementations for the computation of PH. We give a friendly introduction to PH, navigate the pipeline for the computation of PH with an eye towards applications, and use a range of synthetic and real-world data sets to evaluate currently available open-source implementations for the computation of PH. Based on our benchmarking, we indicate which algorithms and implementations are best suited to different types of data sets. In an accompanying tutorial, we provide guidelines for the computation of PH. We make publicly available all scripts that we wrote for the tutorial, and we make available the processed version of the data sets used in the benchmarking.
  • Animals live in groups to defend against predation and to obtain food. However, for some animals --- especially ones that spend long periods of time feeding --- there are costs if a group chooses to move on before their nutritional needs are satisfied. If the conflict between feeding and keeping up with a group becomes too large, it may be advantageous to some animals to split into subgroups of animals with similar nutritional needs. We model the costs and benefits of splitting by a herd of cows using a cost function (CF) that quantifies individual variation in hunger, desire to lie down, and predation risk. We model the costs associated with hunger and lying desire as the standard deviations of individuals within a group, and we model predation risk as an inverse exponential function of group size. We minimize the cost function over all plausible groups that can arise from a given herd and study the dynamics of group splitting. We explore our model using two examples: (1) we consider group switching and group fission in a herd of relatively homogeneous cows; and (2) we examine a herd with an equal number of adult males (larger animals) and adult females (smaller animals).
  • Multiplex networks are a type of multilayer network in which entities are connected to each other via multiple types of connections. We propose a method, based on computing pairwise similarities between layers and then doing community detection, for grouping structurally similar layers in multiplex networks. We illustrate our approach using both synthetic and empirical networks, and we are able to find meaningful groups of layers in both cases. For example, we find that airlines that are based in similar geographic locations tend to be grouped together in an airline multiplex network and that related research areas in physics tend to be grouped together in an multiplex collaboration network.
  • A great deal of effort has gone into trying to model social influence --- including the spread of behavior, norms, and ideas --- on networks. Most models of social influence tend to assume that individuals react to changes in the states of their neighbors without any time delay, but this is often not true in social contexts, where (for various reasons) different agents can have different response times. To examine such situations, we introduce the idea of a timer into threshold models of social influence. The presence of timers on nodes delays the adoption --- i.e., change of state --- of each agent, which in turn delays the adoptions of its neighbors. With a homogeneous-distributed timer, in which all nodes exhibit the same amount of delay, adoption delays are also homogeneous, so the adoption order of nodes remains the same. However, heterogeneously-distributed timers can change the adoption order of nodes and hence the "adoption paths" through which state changes spread in a network. Using a threshold model of social contagions, we illustrate that heterogeneous timers can either accelerate or decelerate the spread of adoptions compared to an analogous situation with homogeneous timers, and we investigate the relationship of such acceleration or deceleration with respect to timer distribution and network structure. We derive an analytical approximation for the temporal evolution of the fraction of adopters by modifying a pair approximation of the Watts threshold model, and we find good agreement with numerical computations. We also examine our new timer model on networks constructed from empirical data.
  • The study of energy transport properties in heterogeneous materials has attracted scientific interest for more than a century, and it continues to offer fundamental and rich questions. One of the unanswered challenges is to extend Anderson theory for uncorrelated and fully disordered lattices in condensed-matter systems to physical settings in which additional effects compete with disorder. Specifically, the effect of strong nonlinearity has been largely unexplored experimentally, partly due to the paucity of testbeds that can combine the effect of disorder and nonlinearity in a controllable manner. Here we present the first systematic experimental study of energy transport and localization properties in simultaneously disordered and nonlinear granular crystals. We demonstrate experimentally that disorder and nonlinearity --- which are known from decades of studies to individually favor energy localization --- can in some sense "cancel each other out", resulting in the destruction of wave localization. We also report that the combined effect of disorder and nonlinearity can enable the manipulation of energy transport speed in granular crystals from subdiffusive to superdiffusive ranges.
  • The study of networks plays a crucial role in investigating the structure, dynamics, and function of a wide variety of complex systems in myriad disciplines. Despite the success of traditional network analysis, standard networks provide a limited representation of complex systems, which often include different types of relationships (i.e., "multiplexity") among their constituent components and/or multiple interacting subsystems. Such structural complexity has a significant effect on both dynamics and function. Throwing away or aggregating available structural information can generate misleading results and be a major obstacle towards attempts to understand complex systems. The recent "multilayer" approach for modeling networked systems explicitly allows the incorporation of multiplexity and other features of realistic systems. On one hand, it allows one to couple different structural relationships by encoding them in a convenient mathematical object. On the other hand, it also allows one to couple different dynamical processes on top of such interconnected structures. The resulting framework plays a crucial role in helping achieve a thorough, accurate understanding of complex systems. The study of multilayer networks has also revealed new physical phenomena that remain hidden when using ordinary graphs, the traditional network representation. Here we survey progress towards attaining a deeper understanding of spreading processes on multilayer networks, and we highlight some of the physical phenomena related to spreading processes that emerge from multilayer structure.
  • Random walks are ubiquitous in the sciences, and they are interesting from both theoretical and practical perspectives. They are one of the most fundamental types of stochastic processes; can be used to model numerous phenomena, including diffusion, interactions, and opinions among humans and animals; and can be used to extract information about important entities or dense groups of entities in a network. Random walks have been studied for many decades on both regular lattices and (especially in the last couple of decades) on networks with a variety of structures. In the present article, we survey the theory and applications of random walks on networks, restricting ourselves to simple cases of single and non-adaptive random walkers. We distinguish three main types of random walks: discrete-time random walks, node-centric continuous-time random walks, and edge-centric continuous-time random walks. We first briefly survey random walks on a line, and then we consider random walks on various types of networks. We extensively discuss applications of random walks, including ranking of nodes (e.g., PageRank), community detection, respondent-driven sampling, and opinion models such as voter models.
  • Message-passing methods provide a powerful approach for calculating the expected size of cascades either on random networks (e.g., drawn from a configuration-model ensemble or its generalizations) asymptotically as the number $N$ of nodes becomes infinite or on specific finite-size networks. We review the message-passing approach and show how to derive it for configuration-model networks using the methods of (Dhar et al., 1997) and (Gleeson, 2008). Using this approach, we explain for such networks how to determine an analytical expression for a "cascade condition", which determines whether a global cascade will occur. We extend this approach to the message-passing methods for specific finite-size networks (Shrestha and Moore, 2014; Lokhov et al., 2015), and we derive a generalized cascade condition. Throughout this chapter, we illustrate these ideas using the Watts threshold model.
  • We study community structure in time-dependent legislation cosponsorship networks in the Peruvian Congress, and we compare them briefly to legislation cosponsorship networks in the US Senate. To study these legislatures, we employ a multilayer representation of temporal networks in which legislators in each layer are connected to each other with a weight that is based on how many bills they cosponsor. We then use multilayer modularity maximization to detect communities in these networks. From our computations, we are able to capture power shifts in the Peruvian Congress during 2006--2011. For example, we observe the emergence of 'opportunists', who switch from one community to another, as well as cohesive legislative communities whose initial component legislators never change communities. Interestingly, many of the opportunists belong to the group that won the majority in Congress.
  • We investigate the application of mesoscopic response functions (MRFs) to characterize a large set of networks of fungi and slime moulds grown under a wide variety of different experimental treatments, including inter-species competition and attack by fungivores. We construct 'structural networks' by estimating cord conductances (which yield edge weights) from the experimental data, and we construct 'functional networks' by calculating edge weights based on how much nutrient traffic is predicted to occur along each edge. Both types of networks have the same topology, and we compute MRFs for both families of networks to illustrate two different ways of constructing taxonomies to group the networks into clusters of related fungi and slime moulds. Although both network taxonomies generate intuitively sensible groupings of networks across species, treatments and laboratories, we find that clustering using the functional-network measure appears to give groups with lower intra-group variation in species or treatments. We argue that MRFs provide a useful quantitative analysis of network behaviour that can (1) help summarize an expanding set of increasingly complex biological networks and (2) help extract information that captures subtle changes in intra- and inter-specific phenotypic traits that are integral to a mechanistic understanding of fungal behaviour and ecology. As an accompaniment to our paper, we also make a large data set of fungal networks available in the public domain.