• This paper explores the information-theoretic limitations of graph property testing in zero-field Ising models. Instead of learning the entire graph structure, sometimes testing a basic graph property such as connectivity, cycle presence or maximum clique size is a more relevant and attainable objective. Since property testing is more fundamental than graph recovery, any necessary conditions for property testing imply corresponding conditions for graph recovery, while custom property tests can be statistically and/or computationally more efficient than graph recovery based algorithms. Understanding the statistical complexity of property testing requires the distinction of ferromagnetic (i.e., positive interactions only) and general Ising models. Using combinatorial constructs such as graph packing and strong monotonicity, we characterize how target properties affect the corresponding minimax upper and lower bounds within the realm of ferromagnets. On the other hand, by studying the detection of an antiferromagnetic (i.e., negative interactions only) Curie-Weiss model buried in Rademacher noise, we show that property testing is strictly more challenging over general Ising models. In terms of methodological development, we propose two types of correlation based tests: computationally efficient screening for ferromagnets, and score type tests for general models, including a fast cycle presence test. Our correlation screening tests match the information-theoretic bounds for property testing in ferromagnets.
  • We consider the recovery of regression coefficients, denoted by $\boldsymbol{\beta}_0$, for a single index model (SIM) relating a binary outcome $Y$ to a set of possibly high dimensional covariates $\boldsymbol{X}$, based on a large but 'unlabeled' dataset $\mathcal{U}$, with $Y$ never observed. On $\mathcal{U}$, we fully observe $\boldsymbol{X}$ and additionally, a surrogate $S$ which, while not being strongly predictive of $Y$ throughout the entirety of its support, can forecast it with high accuracy when it assumes extreme values. Such datasets arise naturally in modern studies involving large databases such as electronic medical records (EMR) where $Y$, unlike $(\boldsymbol{X}, S)$, is difficult and/or expensive to obtain. In EMR studies, an example of $Y$ and $S$ would be the true disease phenotype and the count of the associated diagnostic codes respectively. Assuming another SIM for $S$ given $\boldsymbol{X}$, we show that under sparsity assumptions, we can recover $\boldsymbol{\beta}_0$ proportionally by simply fitting a least squares LASSO estimator to the subset of the observed data on $(\boldsymbol{X}, S)$ restricted to the extreme sets of $S$, with $Y$ imputed using the surrogacy of $S$. We obtain sharp finite sample performance bounds for our estimator, including deterministic deviation bounds and probabilistic guarantees. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through multiple simulation studies, as well as by application to real data from an EMR study conducted at the Partners HealthCare Systems.
  • We propose a new family of combinatorial inference problems for graphical models. Unlike classical statistical inference where the main interest is point estimation or parameter testing, combinatorial inference aims at testing the global structure of the underlying graph. Examples include testing the graph connectivity, the presence of a cycle of certain size, or the maximum degree of the graph. To begin with, we develop a unified theory for the fundamental limits of a large family of combinatorial inference problems. We propose new concepts including structural packing and buffer entropies to characterize how the complexity of combinatorial graph structures impacts the corresponding minimax lower bounds. On the other hand, we propose a family of novel and practical structural testing algorithms to match the lower bounds. We provide thorough numerical results on both synthetic graphical models and brain networks to illustrate the usefulness of these proposed methods.
  • We consider the problem of undirected graphical model inference. In many applications, instead of perfectly recovering the unknown graph structure, a more realistic goal is to infer some graph invariants (e.g., the maximum degree, the number of connected subgraphs, the number of isolated nodes). In this paper, we propose a new inferential framework for testing nested multiple hypotheses and constructing confidence intervals of the unknown graph invariants under undirected graphical models. Compared to perfect graph recovery, our methods require significantly weaker conditions. This paper makes two major contributions: (i) Methodologically, for testing nested multiple hypotheses, we propose a skip-down algorithm on the whole family of monotone graph invariants (The invariants which are non-decreasing under addition of edges). We further show that the same skip-down algorithm also provides valid confidence intervals for the targeted graph invariants. (ii) Theoretically, we prove that the length of the obtained confidence intervals are optimal and adaptive to the unknown signal strength. We also prove generic lower bounds for the confidence interval length for various invariants. Numerical results on both synthetic simulations and a brain imaging dataset are provided to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method.
  • It is known that for a certain class of single index models (SIMs) $Y = f(\boldsymbol{X}_{p \times 1}^\intercal\boldsymbol{\beta}_0, \varepsilon)$, support recovery is impossible when $\boldsymbol{X} \sim \mathcal{N}(0, \mathbb{I}_{p \times p})$ and a model complexity adjusted sample size is below a critical threshold. Recently, optimal algorithms based on Sliced Inverse Regression (SIR) were suggested. These algorithms work provably under the assumption that the design $\boldsymbol{X}$ comes from an i.i.d. Gaussian distribution. In the present paper we analyze algorithms based on covariance screening and least squares with $L_1$ penalization (i.e. LASSO) and demonstrate that they can also enjoy optimal (up to a scalar) rescaled sample size in terms of support recovery, albeit under slightly different assumptions on $f$ and $\varepsilon$ compared to the SIR based algorithms. Furthermore, we show more generally, that LASSO succeeds in recovering the signed support of $\boldsymbol{\beta}_0$ if $\boldsymbol{X} \sim \mathcal{N}(0, \boldsymbol{\Sigma})$, and the covariance $\boldsymbol{\Sigma}$ satisfies the irrepresentable condition. Our work extends existing results on the support recovery of LASSO for the linear model, to a more general class of SIMs.
  • In this paper we study the support recovery problem for single index models $Y=f(\boldsymbol{X}^{\intercal} \boldsymbol{\beta},\varepsilon)$, where $f$ is an unknown link function, $\boldsymbol{X}\sim N_p(0,\mathbb{I}_{p})$ and $\boldsymbol{\beta}$ is an $s$-sparse unit vector such that $\boldsymbol{\beta}_{i}\in \{\pm\frac{1}{\sqrt{s}},0\}$. In particular, we look into the performance of two computationally inexpensive algorithms: (a) the diagonal thresholding sliced inverse regression (DT-SIR) introduced by Lin et al. (2015); and (b) a semi-definite programming (SDP) approach inspired by Amini & Wainwright (2008). When $s=O(p^{1-\delta})$ for some $\delta>0$, we demonstrate that both procedures can succeed in recovering the support of $\boldsymbol{\beta}$ as long as the rescaled sample size $\kappa=\frac{n}{s\log(p-s)}$ is larger than a certain critical threshold. On the other hand, when $\kappa$ is smaller than a critical value, any algorithm fails to recover the support with probability at least $\frac{1}{2}$ asymptotically. In other words, we demonstrate that both DT-SIR and the SDP approach are optimal (up to a scalar) for recovering the support of $\boldsymbol{\beta}$ in terms of sample size. We provide extensive simulations, as well as a real dataset application to help verify our theoretical observations.
  • We propose a new inferential framework for constructing confidence regions and testing hypotheses in statistical models specified by a system of high dimensional estimating equations. We construct an influence function by projecting the fitted estimating equations to a sparse direction obtained by solving a large-scale linear program. Our main theoretical contribution is to establish a unified Z-estimation theory of confidence regions for high dimensional problems. Different from existing methods, all of which require the specification of the likelihood or pseudo-likelihood, our framework is likelihood-free. As a result, our approach provides valid inference for a broad class of high dimensional constrained estimating equation problems, which are not covered by existing methods. Such examples include, noisy compressed sensing, instrumental variable regression, undirected graphical models, discriminant analysis and vector autoregressive models. We present detailed theoretical results for all these examples. Finally, we conduct thorough numerical simulations, and a real dataset analysis to back up the developed theoretical results.