• The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most -- a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform -- a platform where optics, electronics and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.
  • In this paper we use an ab-initio quantum transport approach to study the electron current flowing through lithiated SnO anodes for potential applications in Li-ion batteries. By investigating a set of lithiated structures with varying lithium concentrations, it is revealed that LixSnO can be a good conductor, with values comparable to bulk $\beta$-Sn and Li. A deeper insight into the current distribution indicates that electrons preferably follow specific trajectories, which offer superior conducting properties than others. These channels have been identified and it is shown here how they can enhance or deteriorate the current flow in lithiated anode materials.
  • Light emission from quantum tunneling has challenged researchers for more than four decades due to the intricate interplay of electrical and optical properties in nanoscopic volumes. Here we disentangle electronics and photonics by studying the interactions between electromagnetic modes and tunneling electrons in Van der Waals quantum tunneling (VdWQT) devices, which allow for the independent control over optical and electronic properties. Tunneling in these devices, consisting of vertical stacks of gold, hexagonal boron nitride and graphene, is found to either occur elastically, conserving the electrons energy, or inelastically accompanied by energy loss to phononic or photonic excitations. We unambiguously demonstrate that the emitted light originates from the direct emission of photons by inelastic electron tunneling, described as a spontaneous emission process, rather than hot electron luminescence. Additionally, we achieve spectral shaping and local, resonant enhancement of the photon emission rate by four orders of magnitude by integrating VdWQT devices with optical nanocube antennas.
  • Over the past thirty years, it has been consistently observed that surface engineering of colloidal nanocrystals (NC) is key to their performance parameters. In the case of lead chalcogenide NCs, for example, replacing thiols with halide anion surface termination has been shown to increase power conversion efficiency in NC-based solar cells. To gain insight into the origins of these improvements, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) on experimentally-relevant sized lead sulfide (PbS) NCs constructed with thiol or Cl, Br, and I anion surfaces. The surface of both the thiol- and halide-terminated NCs exhibit low and high-energy phonon modes with large thermal displacements not present in bulk PbS; however, halide anion surface termination reduces the overlap of the electronic wavefunctions with these vibration modes. These findings suggest that electron-phonon interactions will be reduced in the halide terminated NCs, a conclusion that is supported by analyzing the time-dependent evolution of the electronic energies and wavefunctions extracted from the AIMD. This work explains why electron-phonon interactions are crucial to charge carrier dynamics in NCs and how surface engineering can be applied to systematically control their electronic and phononic properties. Furthermore, we propose that the computationally efficient approach of gauging electron-phonon interaction implemented here can be used to guide the design of application-specific surface terminations for arbitrary nanomaterials.
  • An atomistic study of the order-effect occurring in Li$_{x}$CoO$_{2}$ at $x=0.5$ is presented and an explanation for the computationally and experimentally observed dip in the Li diffusivity is proposed. Configurations where a single half-filled Li layer arranged in either a linear or a zig-zag pattern are simulated. It is found that the lowest energy phase is the zig-zag pattern rather than the linear arrangement that currently is considered to be of lowest energy. Atomic interactions are modeled at the DFT level of accuracy and energy barriers for Li-ion diffusion are determined from searches for first order saddle points on the resulting potential energy surface. The determined saddle points reveal that the barriers for diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the zig-zag phase differ significantly and explain the observed dip in diffusivity.
  • Using first-principles calculations, we show that the conduction and valence band energies and their deformation potentials exhibit a non-negligible compositional bowing in strained ternary semiconductor alloys such as InGaAs. The electronic structure of these compounds has been calculated within the framework of local density approximation and hybrid functional approach for large cubic supercells and special quasi-random structures, which represent two kinds of model structures for random alloys. We find that the predicted bowing effect for the band energy deformation potentials is rather insensitive to the choice of the functional and alloy structural model. The direction of bowing is determined by In cations that give a stronger contribution to the formation of the In$_{x}$Ga$_{1-x}$As valence band states with $x\gtrsim 0.5$, compared to Ga cations.
  • A high reversible capacity is a key feature for any rechargeable battery. In the lithium-ion battery technology, tin-oxide anodes do fulfill this requirement, but a fast loss of capacity hinders a full commercialization. Using first-principles calculations, we propose a microscopic model that sheds light on the reversible lithiation/delithiation of SnO and reveals that a sintering of Sn causes a strong degradation of SnO-based anodes. When the initial irreversible transformation ends, active anode grains consist of Li-oxide layers separated by Sn bilayers. During the following reversible lithiation, the Li-oxide undergoes two phase transformations that give rise to a Li-enrichment of the oxide and the formation of a layered SnLi composite. We find that the model-predicted anode volume expansion and voltage profile agree well with experiment, and a layered anode grain is highly-conductive and has a theoretical reversible capacity of 4.5 Li atoms per a SnO host unit. The model suggests that the grain structure has to remain layered to sustain its reversible capacity and a thin-film design of battery anodes could be a remedy for the capacity loss.
  • We suggest that the lithiation of pristine SnO forms a layered Li$_\text{X}$O structure while the expelled tin atoms agglomerate into 'surface' planes separating the Li$_\text{X}$O layers. The proposed lithiation model widely differs from the common assumption that tin segregates into nano-clusters embedded in the lithia matrix. With this model we are able to account for the various tin bonds that are seen experimentally and explain the three volume expansion phases that occur when SnO undergoes lithiation: (i) at low concentrations Li behaves as an intercalated species inducing small volume increases; (ii) for intermediate concentrations SnO transforms into lithia causing a large expansion; (iii) finally, as the Li concentration further increases a saturation of the lithia takes place until a layered Li$_2$O is formed. A moderate volume expansion results from this last process. We also report a 'zipper' nucleation mechanism that could provide the seed for the transformation from tin oxide to lithium oxide.
  • In general, there are two major factors affecting bandgaps in nanostructures: (i) the enhanced electron-electron interactions due to confinement and (ii) the modified self-energy of electrons due to the dielectric screening. While recent theoretical studies on graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) report on the first effect, the effect of dielectric screening from the surrounding materials such as substrates has not been thoroughly investigated. Using large-scale electronic structure calculations based on the GW approach, we show that when GNRs are deposited on substrates, bandgaps get strongly suppressed (by as much as 1 eV) even though the GNR-substrate interaction is weak.
  • The effects of an atomistic interface roughness in n-type silicon nanowire transistors (SiNWT) on the radio frequency performance are analyzed. Interface roughness scattering (IRS) is statistically investigated through a three dimensional full-band quantum transport simulation based on the sp3d5s?* tight-binding model. As the diameter of the SiNWT is scaled down below 3 nm, IRS causes a significant reduction of the cut-off frequency. The fluctuations of the conduction band edge due to the rough surface lead to a reflection of electrons through mode-mismatch. This effect reduces the velocity of electrons and hence the transconductance considerably causing a cut-off frequency reduction.
  • The effect of geometrical confinement, atomic position and orientation of Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) on their thermal properties are investigated using the phonon dispersion obtained using a Modified Valence Force Field (MVFF) model. The specific heat ($C_{v}$) and the ballistic thermal conductance ($\kappa^{bal}_{l}$) shows anisotropic variation with changing cross-section shape and size of the SiNWs. The $C_{v}$ increases with decreasing cross-section size for all the wires. The triangular wires show the largest $C_{v}$ due to their highest surface-to-volume ratio. The square wires with [110] orientation show the maximum $\kappa^{bal}_{l}$ since they have the highest number of conducting phonon modes. At the nano-scale a universal scaling law for both $C_{v}$ and $\kappa^{bal}_{l}$ are obtained with respect to the number of atoms in the unit cell. This scaling is independent of the shape, size and orientation of the SiNWs revealing a direct correlation of the lattice thermal properties to the atomistic properties of the nanowires. Thus, engineering the SiNW cross-section shape, size and orientation open up new ways of tuning the thermal properties at the nanometer regime.
  • Engineering of the cross-section shape and size of ultra-scaled Si nanowires (SiNWs) provides an attractive way for tuning their structural properties. The acoustic and optical phonon shifts of the free-standing circular, hexagonal, square and triangular SiNWs are calculated using a Modified Valence Force Field (MVFF) model. The acoustic phonon blue shift (acoustic hardening) and the optical phonon red shift (optical softening) show a strong dependence on the cross-section shape and size of the SiNWs. The triangular SiNWs have the least structural symmetry as revealed by the splitting of the degenerate flexural phonon modes and The show the minimum acoustic hardening and the maximum optical hardening. The acoustic hardening, in all SiNWs, is attributed to the decreasing difference in the vibrational energy distribution between the inner and the surface atoms with decreasing cross-section size. The optical softening is attributed to the reduced phonon group velocity and the localization of the vibrational energy density on the inner atoms. While the acoustic phonon shift shows a strong wire orientation dependence, the optical phonon softening is independent of wire orientation.
  • Through the Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) formalism, quantum-scale device simulation can be performed with the inclusion of electron-phonon scattering. However, the simulation of realistically sized devices under the NEGF formalism typically requires prohibitive amounts of memory and computation time. Two of the most demanding computational problems for NEGF simulation involve mathematical operations with structured matrices called semiseparable matrices. In this work, we present parallel approaches for these computational problems which allow for efficient distribution of both memory and computation based upon the underlying device structure. This is critical when simulating realistically sized devices due to the aforementioned computational burdens. First, we consider determining a distributed compact representation for the retarded Green's function matrix $G^{R}$. This compact representation is exact and allows for any entry in the matrix to be generated through the inherent semiseparable structure. The second parallel operation allows for the computation of electron density and current characteristics for the device. Specifically, matrix products between the distributed representation for the semiseparable matrix $G^{R}$ and the self-energy scattering terms in $\Sigma^{<}$ produce the less-than Green's function $G^{<}$. As an illustration of the computational efficiency of our approach, we stably generate the mobility for nanowires with cross-sectional sizes of up to 4.5nm, assuming an atomistic model with scattering.
  • Accurate modeling of the pi-bands of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) requires correctly reproducing asymmetries in the bulk graphene bands as well as providing a realistic model for hydrogen passivation of the edge atoms. The commonly used single-pz orbital approach fails on both these counts. To overcome these failures we introduce a nearest-neighbor, three orbital per atom p/d tight-binding model for graphene. The parameters of the model are fit to first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) - based calculations as well as to those based on the many-body Green's function and screened-exchange (GW) formalism, giving excellent agreement with the ab initio AGNR bands. We employ this model to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of an AGNR MOSFET and the conductance of rough-edge AGNRs, finding significant differences versus the single-pz model. These results show that an accurate bandstructure model is essential for predicting the performance of graphene-based nanodevices.
  • The influence of interface roughness scattering (IRS) on the performances of silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (NWFETs) is numerically investigated using a full 3D quantum transport simulator based on the atomistic sp3d5s* tight-binding model. The interface between the silicon and the silicon dioxide layers is generated in a real-space atomistic representation using an experimentally derived autocovariance function (ACVF). The oxide layer is modeled in the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) using fictitious SiO2 atoms. <110>-oriented nanowires with different diameters and randomly generated surface configurations are studied. The experimentally observed ON-current and the threshold voltage is quantitatively captured by the simulation model. The mobility reduction due to IRS is studied through a qualitative comparison of the simulation results with the experimental results.
  • A simulation methodology for ultra-scaled InAs quantum well field effect transistors (QWFETs) is presented and used to provide design guidelines and a path to improve device performance. A multiscale modeling approach is adopted, where strain is computed in an atomistic valence-force-field method, an atomistic sp3d5s* tight-binding model is used to compute channel effective masses, and a 2-D real-space effective mass based ballistic quantum transport model is employed to simulate three terminal current-voltage characteristics including gate leakage. The simulation methodology is first benchmarked against experimental I-V data obtained from devices with gate lengths ranging from 30 to 50 nm. A good quantitative match is obtained. The calibrated simulation methodology is subsequently applied to optimize the design of a 20 nm gate length device. Two critical parameters have been identified to control the gate leakage magnitude of the QWFETs, (i) the geometry of the gate contact (curved or square) and (ii) the gate metal work function. In addition to pushing the threshold voltage towards an enhancement mode operation, a higher gate metal work function can help suppress the gate leakage and allow for much aggressive insulator scaling.
  • he correct estimation of thermal properties of ultra-scaled CMOS and thermoelectric semiconductor devices demands for accurate phonon modeling in such structures. This work provides a detailed description of the modified valence force field (MVFF) method to obtain the phonon dispersion in zinc-blende semiconductors. The model is extended from bulk to nanowires after incorporating proper boundary conditions. The computational demands by the phonon calculation increase rapidly as the wire cross-section size increases. It is shown that the nanowire phonon spectrum differ considerably from the bulk dispersions. This manifests itself in the form of different physical and thermal properties in these wires. We believe that this model and approach will prove beneficial in the understanding of the lattice dynamics in the next generation ultra-scaled semiconductor devices.
  • Phonon dispersions in <100> silicon nanowires (SiNW) are modeled using a Modified Valence Force Field (MVFF) method based on atomistic force constants. The model replicates the bulk Si phonon dispersion very well. In SiNWs, apart from four acoustic like branches, a lot of flat branches appear indicating strong phonon confinement in these nanowires and strongly affecting their lattice properties. The sound velocity (Vsnd) and the lattice thermal conductance (kl) decrease as the wire cross-section size is reduced whereas the specific heat (Cv) increases due to increased phonon confinement and surface-to-volume ratio (SVR).
  • The Landauer approach to diffusive transport is mathematically related to the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, and expressions for the thermoelectric parameters in both formalisms are presented. Quantum mechanical and semiclassical techniques to obtain from a full description of the bandstructure, E(k), the number of conducting channels in the Landauer approach or the transport distribution in the Boltzmann solution are developed and compared. Thermoelectric transport coefficients are evaluated from an atomistic level, full band description of a crystal. Several example calculations for representative bulk materials are presented, and the full band results are related to the more common effective mass formalism. Finally, given a full E(k) for a crystal, a procedure to extract an accurate, effective mass level description is presented.