• As planning for the next generation of high contrast imaging instruments (e.g. WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR, TMT-PFI, EELT-EPICS) matures, and second-generation ground-based extreme adaptive optics facilities (e.g. VLT-SPHERE, Gemini-GPI) are halfway through their principal surveys, it is imperative that the performance of different designs, post-processing algorithms, observing strategies, and survey results be compared in a consistent, statistically robust framework. In this paper, we argue that the current industry standard for such comparisons -- the contrast curve -- falls short of this mandate. We propose a new figure of merit, the "performance map," that incorporates three fundamental concepts in signal detection theory: the true positive fraction (TPF), false positive fraction (FPF), and detection threshold. By supplying a theoretical basis and recipe for generating the performance map, we hope to encourage the widespread adoption of this new metric across subfields in exoplanet imaging.
  • We report on the performance of a vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph that operates over a wavelength range of $2-5 \mu$m and is installed in MagAO/Clio2 at the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The coronagraph manipulates the phase in the pupil to produce three beams yielding two coronagraphic point-spread functions (PSFs) and one faint leakage PSF. The phase pattern is imposed through the inherently achromatic geometric phase, enabled by liquid crystal technology and polarization techniques. The coronagraphic optic is manufactured using a direct-write technique for precise control of the liquid crystal pattern, and multitwist retarders for achromatization. By integrating a linear phase ramp to the coronagraphic phase pattern, two separated coronagraphic PSFs are created with a single pupil-plane optic, which makes it robust and easy to install in existing telescopes. The two coronagraphic PSFs contain a 180$^\circ$ dark hole on each side of a star, and these complementary copies of the star are used to correct the seeing halo close to the star. To characterize the coronagraph, we collected a dataset of a bright ($m_L=0-1$) nearby star with $\sim$1.5 hr of observing time. By rotating and optimally scaling one PSF and subtracting it from the other PSF, we see a contrast improvement by 1.46 magnitudes at $3.5 \lambda/D$. With regular angular differential imaging at 3.9 $\mu$m, the MagAO vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph delivers a $5\sigma\ \Delta$ mag contrast of 8.3 ($=10^{-3.3}$) at 2 $\lambda/D$ and 12.2 ($=10^{-4.8}$) at $3.5 \lambda/D$.
  • RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. We show that the distribution of light curve gradients is non-uniform for deep events, which we interpret as possible evidence for an asteroidal fragment-like clump structure. However, the clumps are very likely seen above a high optical depth mid-plane, so the disk's bulk clumpiness is not revealed. While circumstantial evidence suggests an asteroid belt is more plausible than a gas-rich transition disk, the evolutionary status remains uncertain. We suggest that the rarity of Sun-like stars showing disk-related variability may arise because i) any accretion streams are transparent, and/or ii) turbulence above the inner rim is normally shadowed by a flared outer disk.
  • Context. J1407 (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 in full) is a young star in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association that underwent a series of complex eclipses over 56 days in 2007. To explain these, it was hypothesised that a secondary substellar companion, J1407b, has a giant ring system filling a large fraction of the Hill sphere, causing the eclipses. Observations have not successfully detected J1407b, but do rule out circular orbits for the companion around the primary star. Aims. We test to what degree the ring model of J1407b could survive in an eccentric orbit required to fit the observations. Methods. We run N-body simulations under the AMUSE framework to test the stability of Hill radius-filling systems where the companion is on an eccentric orbit. Results. We strongly rule out prograde ring systems and find that a secondary of 60 to 100MJup with an 11 year orbital period and retrograde orbiting material can survive for at least $10^4$ orbits and produce eclipses with similar durations as the observed one.
  • The differential Optical Transfer Function (dOTF) is a focal plane wavefront sensing method that uses a diversity in the pupil plane to generate two different focal plane images. The difference of their Fourier transforms recovers the complex amplitude of the pupil down to the spatial scale of the diversity. We produce two simultaneous PSF images with diversity using a polarizing filter at the edge of the telescope pupil, and a polarization camera to simultaneously record the two images. Here we present the first on-sky demonstration of polarization dOTF at the 1.0m South African Astronomical Observatory telescope in Sutherland, and our attempt to validate it with simultaneous Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor images.
  • The light curve of 1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6, a $\sim$16 Myr old star in the Sco-Cen OB association, underwent a complex series of deep eclipses that lasted 56 days, centered on April 2007. This light curve is interpreted as the transit of a giant ring system that is filling up a fraction of the Hill sphere of an unseen secondary companion, J1407b. We fit the light curve with a model of an azimuthally symmetric ring system, including spatial scales down to the temporal limit set by the star's diameter and relative velocity. The best ring model has 37 rings and extends out to a radius of 0.6 AU (90 million km), and the rings have an estimated total mass on the order of $100 M_{Moon}$. The ring system has one clearly defined gap at 0.4 AU (61 million km), which we hypothesize is being cleared out by a $< 0.8 M_{\oplus}$ exosatellite orbiting around J1407b. This eclipse and model implies that we are seeing a circumplanetary disk undergoing a dynamic transition to an exosatellite-sculpted ring structure and is one of the first seen outside our Solar system.
  • We present our first results from a high-contrast imaging search for planetary mass companions around stars with gapped debris disks, as inferred from the stars' bright infrared excesses. For the six considered stars, we model the disks' unresolved infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in order to derive the temperature and location of the disk components. With VLT/NaCo Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraphic L'-band imaging, we search for planetary mass companions that may be sculpting the disks. We detect neither disks nor companions in this sample, confirmed by comparing plausible point sources with archival data. In order to calculate our mass sensitivity limit, we revisit the stellar age estimates. One target, HD 17848, at 540$\pm$100 Myr old is significantly older than previously estimated. We then discuss our high-contrast imaging results with respect to the disk properties.
  • LP 876-10 is a nearby active M4 dwarf in Aquarius at a distance of 7.6 pc. The star is a new addition to the 10-pc census, with a parallax measured via the Research Consortium on Nearby Stars (RECONS) astrometric survey on the Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System's (SMARTS) 0.9-m telescope. We demonstrate that the astrometry, radial velocity, and photometric data for LP 876-10 are consistent with the star being a third, bound, stellar component to the Fomalhaut multiple system, despite the star lying nearly 6 degrees away from Fomalhaut A in the sky. The 3D separation of LP 876-10 from Fomalhaut is only 0.77+-0.01 pc, and 0.987+-0.006 pc from TW PsA (Fomalhaut B), well within the estimated tidal radius of the Fomalhaut system (1.9 pc). LP 876-10 shares the motion of Fomalhaut within ~1 km/s, and we estimate an interloper probability of ~10^{-5}. Neither our echelle spectroscopy nor astrometry are able to confirm the close companion to LP 876-10 reported in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WSI 138). We argue that the Castor Moving Group to which the Fomalhaut system purportedly belongs, is likely to be a dynamical stream, and hence membership to the group does not provide useful age constraints for group members. LP 876-10 (Fomalhaut C) has now risen from obscurity to become a rare example of a field M dwarf with well-constrained age (440+-40 Myr) and metallicity. Besides harboring a debris disk system and candidate planet, Fomalhaut now has two of the widest known stellar companions.
  • Gliese 569B is a multiple brown dwarf system whose exact nature has been the subject of several investigations over the past few years. Interpretation has partially relied on infra-red photometry and spectroscopy of the resolved components of the system. We present seeing limited Ks photometry over four nights, searching for variability in this young low mass substellar system. Our photometry is consistent with other reported photometry, and we report the tentative detection of several periodic signals consistent with rotational modulation due to spots on their surfaces. The five significant periods range from 2.90 hours to 12.8 hours with peak to peak variabilities from 28 mmag to 62 mmag in the Ks band. If both components are rotating with the shortest periods, then their rotation axes are not parallel with each other, and the rotation axis of the Bb component is not perpendicular to the Ba-Bb orbital plane. If Bb has one of the longer rotational periods, then the Bb rotation axis is consistent with being parallel to the orbital axis of the Ba-Bb system.
  • <abridged> The large relative sizes of circumstellar and circumplanetary disks imply that they might be seen in eclipse in stellar light curves. We estimate that a survey of ~10^4 young (~10 Myr old) post-accretion pre-MS stars monitored for ~10 years should yield at least a few deep eclipses from circumplanetary disks and disks surrounding low mass companion stars. We present photometric and spectroscopic data for a pre-MS K5 star (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6), a newly discovered ~0.9 Msun member of the ~16 Myr-old Upper Cen-Lup subgroup of Sco-Cen at a kinematic distance of 128 pc. SuperWASP and ASAS light curves for this star show a remarkably long, deep, and complex eclipse event centered on 29 April 2007. At least 5 multi-day dimming events of >0.5 mag are identified, with a >3.3 mag deep eclipse bracketed by two pairs of ~1 mag eclipses symmetrically occurring +-12 days and +-26 days before and after. Hence, significant dimming of the star was taking place on and off over at least a ~54 day period in 2007, and a strong >1 mag dimming event occurred over a ~12 day span. We place a firm lower limit on the period of 850 days (i.e. the orbital radius of the eclipser must be >1.7 AU and orbital velocity must be <22 km/s). The shape of the light curve is similar to the lop-sided eclipses of the Be star EE Cep. We suspect that this new star is being eclipsed by a low-mass object orbited by a dense inner disk, girded by at least 3 dusty rings of lower optical depth. Between these rings are at least two annuli of near-zero optical depth (i.e. gaps), possibly cleared out by planets or moons, depending on the nature of the secondary. For possible periods in the range 2.33-200 yr, the estimated total ring mass is ~8-0.4 Mmoon (if the rings have optical opacity similar to Saturn's rings), and the edge of the outermost detected ring has orbital radius ~0.4-0.09 AU.
  • This paper aims at giving an update on the most versatile adaptive optics fed instrument to date, the well known and successful NACO . Although NACO is only scheduled for about two more years at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), it keeps on evolving with additional operation modes bringing original astronomical results. The high contrast imaging community uses it creatively as a test-bench for SPHERE and other second generation planet imagers. A new visible wavefront sensor (WFS) optimized for Laser Guide Star (LGS) operations has been installed and tested, the cube mode is more and more requested for frame selection on bright sources, a seeing enhancer mode (no tip/tilt correction) is now offered to provide full sky coverage and welcome all kind of extragalactic applications, etc. The Instrument Operations Team (IOT) and Paranal engineers are currently working hard at maintaining the instrument overall performances but also at improving them and offering new capabilities, providing the community with a well tuned and original instrument for the remaining time it is being used. The present contribution delivers a non-exhaustive overview of the new modes and experiments that have been carried out in the past months.
  • We describe a coronagraphic optic for use with CONICA at the VLT that provides suppression of diffraction from 1.8 to 7 lambda/D at 4.05 microns, an optimal wavelength for direct imaging of cool extrasolar planets. The optic is designed to provide 10 magnitudes of contrast at 0.2 arcseconds, over a D-shaped region in the image plane, without the need for any focal plane occulting mask.
  • We present direct imaging observations at wavelengths of 3.3, 3.8 (L',band), and 4.8 (M band) microns, for the planetary system surrounding HR 8799. All three planets are detected at L'. The c and d component are detected at 3.3 microns, and upper limits are derived from the M band observations. These observations provide useful constraints on warm giant planet atmospheres. We discuss the current age constraints on the HR 8799 system, and show that several potential co-eval objects can be excluded from being co-moving with the star. Comparison of the photometry is made to models for giant planet atmospheres. Models which include non-equilibrium chemistry provide a reasonable match to the colors of c and d. From the observed colors in the thermal infrared we estimate T_eff < 960 K for b, and T_eff=1300 and 1170 K for c and d, respectively. This provides an independent check on the effective temperatures and thus masses of the objects from the Marois 2008 results.
  • A candidate < 3 Jupiter mass, extrasolar planet was recently imaged by Kalas et al. (2008) using HST/ACS at 12.7" (96 AU) separation from the nearby (d = 7.7 pc) young (~200 Myr) A2V star Fomalhaut. Here we report results from M-band (4.8 micron) imaging of Fomalhaut on 5 Dec 2006 using the Clio IR imager on the 6.5-m MMT with the adaptive secondary mirror. Our images are sensitive to giant planets at orbital radii comparable to the outer solar system (~5-40 AU). Comparing our 5-sigma M-band photometric limits to theoretical evolutionary tracks for substellar objects, our results rule out the existence of planets with masses greater than 2 Jupiter masses, from ~13-40 AU and objects greater than 13 Jupiter masses from ~8-40 AU.
  • We present the first astronomical observations obtained with an Apodizing Phase Plate (APP). The plate is designed to suppress the stellar diffraction pattern by 5 magnitudes from 2-9 lambda/D over a 180 degree region. Stellar images were obtained in the M' band (4.85 microns) at the MMTO 6.5m telescope, with adaptive wavefront correction made with a deformable secondary mirror designed for low thermal background observations. The measured PSF shows a halo intensity of 0.1% of the stellar peak at 2 lambda/D (0.36 arcsec), tapering off as r^{-5/3} out to radius 9 lambda/D. Such a profile is consistent with residual errors predicted for servo lag in the AO system. We project a 5 sigma contrast limit, set by residual atmospheric fluctuations, of 10.2 magnitudes at 0.36 arcsec separation for a one hour exposure. This can be realised if static and quasi-static aberrations are removed by differential imaging, and is close to the sensitivity level set by thermal background photon noise for target stars with M'>3. The advantage of using the phase plate is the removal of speckle noise caused by the residuals in the diffraction pattern that remain after PSF subtraction. The APP gives higher sensitivity over the range 2-5 lambda/D compared to direct imaging techniques.
  • Vega may have a massive companion in a wide orbit, as evidenced by structure in its cold dust debris. We have tested this hypothesis by direct imaging with adaptive optics in the M band. The observations were made with a newly commissioned thermal infrared camera, Clio, on the 6.5 MMT AO system with low-background deformable secondary. The observations constrain a planet to be less than 7 M$_J$ at the approximate position angle expected from the dust structure and at a radius $>$ 20AU (2.5 arcsec) . This result is more stringent than similar previous near-infrared observations of Vega, that achieve limits of 20 and 10 M$_J$ at separations of 7 arcsec. The higher sensitivity is due both to the more favorable contrast of gas giant planets at M band and to the higher Strehl and more stable point spread function at longer wavelengths. Future L' or M band observations could provide a powerful approach for wide separation planet detection, especially for cooler, and thus older or less massive planets. The natural best targets are nearby stars where planets in the range of 5-15 M$_J$ and as old as several Gyr are expected to be detectable with this technique.
  • We report follow-up observations of two gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) dataset. We have confirmed that SDSS J102111.02+491330.4 is a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. This lens system exhibits two images of a $z = 1.72$ quasar, with an image separation of $1{\farcs}14 \pm 0.04$. Optical and near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Observations of SDSS J112012.12+671116.0 indicate that it is more likely a binary quasar than a gravitational lens. This system has two quasars at a redshift of $z = 1.49$, with an angular separation of $1{\farcs}49 \pm 0.02$. However, the two quasars have markedly different SEDs and no lens galaxy is apparent in optical and near-IR images of this system. We also present a list of 31 SDSS lens candidates which follow-up observations have confirmed are \textit{not} gravitational lenses.
  • We present details of a prototype fiber feed for use on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) that uses a dedicated fiber-fed medium/high resolution (R > 10000) visible-band spectrograph to give integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of an extended object. A focal reducer couples light from the telescope to the close-packed lenslet array and fiber feed, allowing the spectrograph be used on other telescopes with the change of a single lens. By considering the properties of the fibers in the design of the spectrograph, an efficient design can be realised, and we present the first scientific results of a prototype spectrograph using a fiber feed with 37 spatial elements, namely the detection of Lithium confirming a brown dwarf candidate and IFS of the supernova remnant SN1987A.