• A metastable {\epsilon}-Al60Sm11 phase appears during the initial devitrification of as-quenched Al-10.2 at.% Sm glasses. The {\epsilon} phase is nonstoichiometric in nature since Al occupation is observed on the 16f Sm lattice sites. Scanning transmission electron microscopic images reveal profound spatial correlation of Sm content on these sites, which cannot be explained by the "average crystal" description from Rietveld analysis of diffraction data. Thermodynamically favorable configurations, established by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations based on a cluster-expansion model, also give qualitatively different correlation functions from experimental observations. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations of the growth of {\epsilon}-Al60Sm11 in undercooled liquid show that when the diffusion range of Sm is limited to ~ 4 {\AA}, the correlation function of the as-grown crystal structure agrees well with that of the STEM images. Our results show that kinetic effects, especially the limited diffusivity of Sm atoms plays the fundamental role in determining the nonstoichiometric site occupancies of the {\epsilon}-Al60Sm11 phase during the crystallization process.
  • Further property enhancement of alnico, an attractive near-term, non-rare-earth permanent magnet alloy system, primarily composed of Al, Ni, Co, and Fe, relies on improved morphology control and size refinement of its complex spinodally decomposed nanostructure that forms during heat-treatment. Using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques, this study evaluates the magnetic properties and microstructures of an isotropic 32.4Fe-38.1Co-12.9Ni-7.3Al-6.4Ti-3.0Cu (wt.$\%$) alloy in terms of processing parameters such as annealing temperature, annealing time, application of an external magnetic field, as well as low-temperature "draw" annealing. Optimal spinodal morphology and spacing is formed within a narrow temperature and time range ($\sim 840 \unicode{x2103}$ and 10 min during thermal-magnetic annealing (MA). The ideal morphology is a mosaic structure consisting of periodically arrayed $\sim 40$ nm diameter (Fe-Co)-rich rods ($\alpha_1$ phase) embedded in an (Al-Ni)-rich ($\alpha_2$ phase) matrix. A Cu-enriched phase with a size of $\sim$ 3-5 nm is located at the corners of two adjacent $\{110\}$ facets of the $\alpha_1$ phase. The MA process significantly increased remanence ($B_\text{r}$) ($\sim$ 40-70 $\%$) of the alloy due to biased elongation of the $\alpha_1$ phase along the $\langle100\rangle$ crystallographic direction, which is closest in orientation to the applied magnetic field. The optimum magnetic properties of the alloy with an intrinsic coercivity ($H_\text{cj}$) of 1845 Oe and a maximum energy product ($BH_\text{max}$) of 5.9 MGOe were attributed to the uniformity of the mosaic structure.
  • Micromagnetic simulations of alnico show substantial deviations from Stoner-Wohlfarth behavior due to the unique size and spatial distribution of the rod-like Fe-Co phase formed during spinodal decomposition in an external magnetic field. The maximum coercivity is limited by single-rod effects, especially deviations from ellipsoidal shape, and by interactions between the rods. Both the exchange interaction between connected rods and magnetostatic interaction between rods are considered, and the results of our calculations show good agreement with recent experiments. Unlike systems dominated by magnetocrystalline anisotropy, coercivity in alnico is highly dependent on size, shape, and geometric distribution of the Fe-Co phase, all factors that can be tuned with appropriate chemistry and thermal-magnetic annealing.
  • The electronic structure and intrinsic magnetic properties of $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$-related compounds and their alloys have been investigated using density functional theory. For $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$, the crystallographic $a$ axis is the easiest axis, which agrees with experiments. The magnetic ground state of $\text{Mn}_2\text{AlB}_2$ is found to be ferromagnetic in the basal $ab$ plane, but antiferromagnetic along the $c$ axis. All $3d$ dopings considered decrease the magnetization and Curie temperature in $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$. Electron doping with Co or Ni has a stronger effect on the decreasing of Curie temperature in $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$ than hole doping with Mn or Cr. However, a larger amount of Mn doping on $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$ promotes the ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition. A very anisotropic magnetoelastic effect is found in $\text{Fe}_2\text{AlB}_2$: the magnetization has a much stronger dependence on the lattice parameter $c$ than on $a$ or $b$, which is explained by electronic-structure features near the Fermi level. Dopings of other elements on B and Al sites are also discussed.
  • Transport and magnetic studies of PbTaSe$_2$ under pressure suggest existence of two superconducting phases with the low temperature phase boundary at $\sim 0.25$ GPa that is defined by a very sharp, first order, phase transition. The first order phase transition line can be followed via pressure dependent resistivity measurements, and is found to be near 0.12 GPa near room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction at elevated temperatures confirm that this first order phase transition is structural and occurs at ambient pressure near $\sim 425$ K. The new, high temperature / high pressure phase has a similar crystal structure and slightly lower unit cell volume relative to the ambient pressure, room temperature structure. Based on first-principles calculations this structure is suggested to be obtained by shifting the Pb atoms from the $1a$ to $1e$ Wyckoff position without changing the positions of Ta and Se atoms. PbTaSe$_2$ has an exceptionally pressure sensitive, structural phase transition with $\Delta T_s/\Delta P \approx - 1700$ K/GPa near 4 K, this first order transition causes an $\sim 1$ K ($\sim 25 \%$) step - like decrease in $T_c$ as pressure is increased through 0.25 GPa.
  • The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT~MnBi). To date, the properties of the HT~MnBi, which is stable between $613$ and $719$~K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT~MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn$_{1.0625-x}$Rh$_{x}$Bi [$x=0.02(1)$] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni$_2$In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of $416$~K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT~MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately $3$~$\mu_B$/f.u. at low temperatures. While this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.
  • Phase selection in deeply undercooled liquids and devitrified glasses during heating involves complex interplay between the barriers to nucleation and the ability for these nuclei to grow. During the devitrification of glassy alloys, complicated metastable structures often precipitate instead of simpler, more stable compounds. Here, we access this unconventional type of phase selections by investigating an Al-10%Sm system, where a complicated cubic structure first precipitates with a large lattice parameter of 1.4 nm. We not only solve the structure of this "big cubic" phase containing ~140 atoms but establish an explicit interconnection between the structural orderings of the amorphous alloy and the cubic phase, which provides a low-barrier nucleation pathway at low temperatures. The surprising rapid growth of the crystal is attributed to its high tolerance to point defects, which minimize the short-scale atomic rearrangements to form the crystal. Our study suggests a new scenario of devitrification, where phase transformation proceeds initially without partitioning through a complex intermediate crystal phase.