• The measured $B$-meson semi-leptonic branching ratios $R_{D}$ and $R_{D^*}$ have long-standing deviations between theory and experiment. We introduce a model which explains both anomalies through a single interaction by introducing a right-handed neutrino as the missing energy particle. This interaction is mediated by a heavy charged vector boson ($W'$) which couples only to right-handed quarks and leptons of the Standard Model through the mixing of these particles with new vector-like fermions. Previous $W'$ models for the $R_{D^{(*)}}$ anomaly were strongly constrained from flavor changing neutral currents and direct collider searches for $Z'\to\tau\tau$ resonances. We show that relying on right-handed fermion mixing enables us to avoid these constraints, as well as other severe bounds from electroweak precision tests and neutrino mixing.
  • The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: the dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption, and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored, but potentially interesting.
  • In previous work, we identified an anomalous number of events in the LHC jets+MET searches characterized by low jet multiplicity and low-to-moderate transverse energy variables. Here, we update this analysis with results from a new ATLAS search in the monojet channel which also shows a consistent excess. As before, we find that this "monojet excess" is well-described by the resonant production of a heavy colored state decaying to a quark and a massive invisible particle. In the combined ATLAS and CMS data, we now find a local (global) preference of 3.3$\sigma$ (2.5$\sigma$) for the new physics model over the Standard Model-only hypothesis. As the signal regions containing the excess are systematics-limited, we consider additional cuts to enhance the signal-to-background ratio. We show that binning finer in $H_T$ and requiring the jets to be more central can increase $S/B$ by a factor of ${\sim} 1.5$.
  • We derive the latest constraints on various simplified models of natural SUSY with light higgsinos, stops and gluinos, using a detailed and comprehensive reinterpretation of the most recent 13 TeV ATLAS and CMS searches with $\sim 15$ fb$^{-1}$ of data. We discuss the implications of these constraints for fine-tuning of the electroweak scale. While the most "vanilla" version of SUSY (the MSSM with $R$-parity and flavor-degenerate sfermions) with 10% fine-tuning is ruled out by the current constraints, models with decoupled valence squarks or reduced missing energy can still be fully natural. However, in all of these models, the mediation scale must be extremely low ($<100$ TeV). We conclude by considering the prospects for the high-luminosity LHC era, where we expect the current limits on particle masses to improve by up to $\sim 1$ TeV, and discuss further model-building directions for natural SUSY that are motivated by this work.
  • In this paper we describe a novel, model-independent technique of "rectangular aggregations" for mining the LHC data for hints of new physics. A typical (CMS) search now has hundreds of signal regions, which can obscure potentially interesting anomalies. Applying our technique to the two CMS jets+MET SUSY searches, we identify a set of previously overlooked $\sim 3\sigma$ excesses. Among these, four excesses survive tests of inter- and intra-search compatibility, and two are especially interesting: they are largely overlapping between the jets+MET searches and are characterized by low jet multiplicity, zero $b$-jets, and low MET and $H_T$. We find that resonant color-triplet production decaying to a quark plus an invisible particle provides an excellent fit to these two excesses and all other data -- including the ATLAS jets+MET search, which actually sees a correlated excess. We discuss the additional constraints coming from dijet resonance searches, monojet searches and pair production. Based on these results, we believe the wide-spread view that the LHC data contains no interesting excesses is greatly exaggerated.
  • Any form of dark matter which was in thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model in the early Universe must have some annihilation mechanism in order to avoid overclosure. In general, such models are now constrained by the negative experimental results from colliders, direct detection, and indirect detection, all of which are capable of probing interactions at the approximate strength suggested by a thermal cross section. It is timely to consider what scenarios of thermal dark matter which are still viable. In this paper we consider a class of dark matter models which is designed to avoid many of the current constraints: Majorana dark matter coupling to the Standard Model through leptophilic singlet scalars and pseudoscalars. We show that requiring realistic electroweak symmetry breaking generically forces the mediators to couple with quarks, allowing these models to be constrained by the current experimental data. We find that -- barring fine-tuning -- this type of thermal dark matter is excluded by a combination of direct and indirect detection for masses below $\sim 100$ GeV. Heavier dark matter is still viable, but in principle visible via its indirect detection signature.
  • Dark matter interacting with the Standard Model fermions through new scalars or pseudoscalars with flavour-diagonal couplings proportional to fermion mass are well motivated theoretically, and provide a useful phenomenological model with which to interpret experimental results. Two modes of dark matter production from these models have been considered in the existing literature: pairs of dark matter produced through top quark loops with an associated monojet in the event, and pair production of dark matter with pairs of heavy flavoured quarks (tops or bottoms). In this paper, we demonstrate that a third, previously overlooked channel yields a non-negligible contribution to LHC dark matter searches in these models. In spite of a generally lower production cross section at LHC when compared to the associated top-pair channel, non-flavour violating single top quark processes are kinematically favored and can significantly increase the sensitivity to these models. Including dark matter production in association with a single top quark through scalar or pseudoscalar mediators, the exclusion limit set by the LHC searches for dark matter can be improved by $30$--$90\%$, depending on the mass assumed for the mediator particle.
  • Requiring that the contributions of supersymmetric particles to the Higgs mass are not highly tuned places upper limits on the masses of superpartners -- in particular the higgsino, stop, and gluino. We revisit the details of the tuning calculation and introduce a number of improvements, including RGE resummation, two-loop effects, a proper treatment of UV vs. IR masses, and threshold corrections. This improved calculation more accurately connects the tuning measure with the physical masses of the superpartners at LHC-accessible energies. After these refinements, the tuning bound on the stop is now also sensitive to the masses of the 1st and 2nd generation squarks, which limits how far these can be decoupled in Effective SUSY scenarios. We find that, for a fixed level of tuning, our bounds can allow for heavier gluinos and stops than previously considered. Despite this, the natural region of supersymmetry is under pressure from the LHC constraints, with high messenger scales particularly disfavored.
  • We study the local dark matter velocity distribution in simulated Milky Way-mass galaxies, generated at high resolution with both dark matter and baryons. We find that the dark matter in the Solar neighborhood is influenced appreciably by the inclusion of baryons, increasing the speed of dark matter particles compared to dark matter-only simulations. The gravitational potential due to the presence of a baryonic disk increases the amount of high velocity dark matter, resulting in velocity distributions which are more similar to the Maxwellian Standard Halo Model than predicted from dark matter-only simulations. Further, the velocity structures present in baryonic simulations possess a greater diversity than expected from dark matter-only simulation. We show the impact on the direct detection experiments LUX, DAMA/Libra, and CoGeNT using our simulated velocity distributions, and explore how resolution and halo mass within the Milky Way's estimated mass range impact the results. A Maxwellian fit to the velocity distribution tends to overpredict the amount of dark matter in the high velocity tail, even with baryons, and thus leads to overly optimistic direct detection bounds on models which are dependent on this region of phase space for an experimental signal. Our work further demonstrates that it is critical to transform simulated velocity distributions to the lab frame of reference, due to the fact that velocity structure in the Solar neighborhood appears when baryons are included. There is more velocity structure present when baryons are included than in dark matter-only simulations. Even when baryons are included, the importance of the velocity structure is not as apparent in the Galactic frame of reference as in the Earth frame.
  • I perform a combined analysis of the ATLAS and CMS diphoton data, using both Run-I and Run-II results, including those released at the 2016 Moriond conference. I find combining the ATLAS and CMS results from Run-II increases the statistical significance of the reported 750 GeV anomaly, assuming a spin-0 mediator coupling to gluons or heavy quarks with a width much smaller than the detector resolution. This significance does not decrease when the 8 TeV data is included. A spin-2 mediator is disfavored compared to the spin-0 case. The cross section required to fit the ATLAS anomaly is in tension with the aggregate data, all of which prefers a smaller value. The best fit for all models I consider is a $4.0\sigma$ local significance for a 750 GeV spin-0 mediator coupling to gluons with a cross section of 4 fb at 13 TeV (assuming narrow width) or 10~fb (assuming $\Gamma=45$ GeV).
  • The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is the second-largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way and is only 60 kpc away. As a nearby, massive, and dense object with relatively low astrophysical backgrounds, it is a natural target for dark matter indirect detection searches. In this work, we use six years of Pass 8 data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for gamma-ray signals of dark matter annihilation in the SMC. Using data-driven fits to the gamma-ray backgrounds, and a combination of N-body simulations and direct measurements of rotation curves to estimate the SMC DM density profile, we found that the SMC was well described by standard astrophysical sources, and no signal from dark matter annihilation was detected. We set conservative upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section. These constraints are in agreement with stronger constraints set by searches in the Large Magellanic Cloud and approach the canonical thermal relic cross section at dark matter masses lower than 10 GeV in the $b\bar{b}$ and $\tau^+\tau^-$ channels.
  • The vector boson fusion (VBF) event topology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) allows efficient suppression of dijet backgrounds and is therefore a promising target for new physics searches. We consider dark matter models which interact with the Standard Model through the electroweak sector: either through new scalar and pseudoscalar mediators which can be embedded into the Higgs sector, or via effective operators suppressed by some higher scale, and therefore have significant VBF production cross-sections. Using realistic simulations of the ATLAS and CMS analysis chain, including estimates of major error sources, we project the discovery and exclusion potential of the LHC for these models over the next decade.
  • Characterizing the 125 GeV Higgs is a critical component of the physics program at the LHC Run II. In this Letter, we consider $t\bar{t}H$ associated production in the dileptonic mode. We demonstrate that the difference in azimuthal angle between the leptons from top decays can directly reveal the CP-structure of the top-Higgs coupling with the sensitivity of the measurement substantiality enhanced in the boosted Higgs regime. We first show how to access this channel via $H \to b\bar{b}$ jet-substructure tagging, then demonstrate the ability of the new variable to measure CP. Our analysis includes all signal and background samples simulated via the MC@NLO algorithm including hadronization and underlying-event effects. Using boosted Higgs substructure with dileptonic tops, we find that the top-Higgs coupling strength and the CP structure can be directly probed with achievable luminosity at the 13 TeV LHC.
  • We consider the production of dark matter in association with a pair of top quarks, mediated by a scalar or pseudoscalar particle in a generic Simplified Model. We demonstrate that the difference of azimuthal angle between the two leptons $\Delta \phi_{ll}$, in the dileptonic top decay mode, can directly probe the CP-properties of the mediator. We estimate the constraints to strength and CP-structure of dark matter production for these well-motivated Simplified Models from the LHC Run II.
  • We examine the leptophilic two Higgs doublet model with fermionic dark matter, considering the range of experimental constraints on the Higgs sector. The measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs from the LHC Run-I allow us to focus on those remaining processes that may play an important role at colliders. We find that the leptophilic model allows for a much lighter Higgs than in other two-Higgs models, although discovery at the LHC will be difficult. Adding a dark matter sector motivated by supersymmetric extensions of the leptophilic model, we find the existing parameter space can accommodate constraints from direct detection and the invisible widths of the Higgs and $Z$, while also fitting the Galactic Center gamma ray excess reported by analyses of Fermi-LAT data. We also discuss the status of the fully supersymmetric version of such models, which include four Higgs doublets and a natural dark matter candidate.
  • Daniel Abercrombie, Nural Akchurin, Ece Akilli, Juan Alcaraz Maestre, Brandon Allen, Barbara Alvarez Gonzalez, Jeremy Andrea, Alexandre Arbey, Georges Azuelos, Patrizia Azzi, Mihailo Backović, Yang Bai, Swagato Banerjee, James Beacham, Alexander Belyaev, Antonio Boveia, Amelia Jean Brennan, Oliver Buchmueller, Matthew R. Buckley, Giorgio Busoni, Michael Buttignol, Giacomo Cacciapaglia, Regina Caputo, Linda Carpenter, Nuno Filipe Castro, Guillelmo Gomez Ceballos, Yangyang Cheng, John Paul Chou, Arely Cortes Gonzalez, Chris Cowden, Francesco D'Eramo, Annapaola De Cosa, Michele De Gruttola, Albert De Roeck, Andrea De Simone, Aldo Deandrea, Zeynep Demiragli, Anthony DiFranzo, Caterina Doglioni, Tristan du Pree, Robin Erbacher, Johannes Erdmann, Cora Fischer, Henning Flaecher, Patrick J. Fox, Benjamin Fuks, Marie-Helene Genest, Bhawna Gomber, Andreas Goudelis, Johanna Gramling, John Gunion, Kristian Hahn, Ulrich Haisch, Roni Harnik, Philip C. Harris, Kerstin Hoepfner, Siew Yan Hoh, Dylan George Hsu, Shih-Chieh Hsu, Yutaro Iiyama, Valerio Ippolito, Thomas Jacques, Xiangyang Ju, Felix Kahlhoefer, Alexis Kalogeropoulos, Laser Seymour Kaplan, Lashkar Kashif, Valentin V. Khoze, Raman Khurana, Khristian Kotov, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Suchita Kulkarni, Shuichi Kunori, Viktor Kutzner, Hyun Min Lee, Sung-Won Lee, Seng Pei Liew, Tongyan Lin, Steven Lowette, Romain Madar, Sarah Malik, Fabio Maltoni, Mario Martinez Perez, Olivier Mattelaer, Kentarou Mawatari, Christopher McCabe, Théo Megy, Enrico Morgante, Stephen Mrenna, Siddharth M. Narayanan, Andy Nelson, Sérgio F. Novaes, Klaas Ole Padeken, Priscilla Pani, Michele Papucci, Manfred Paulini, Christoph Paus, Jacopo Pazzini, Björn Penning, Michael E. Peskin, Deborah Pinna, Massimiliano Procura, Shamona F. Qazi, Davide Racco, Emanuele Re, Antonio Riotto, Thomas G. Rizzo, Rainer Roehrig, David Salek, Arturo Sanchez Pineda, Subir Sarkar, Alexander Schmidt, Steven Randolph Schramm, William Shepherd, Gurpreet Singh, Livia Soffi, Norraphat Srimanobhas, Kevin Sung, Tim M. P. Tait, Timothee Theveneaux-Pelzer, Marc Thomas, Mia Tosi, Daniele Trocino, Sonaina Undleeb, Alessandro Vichi, Fuquan Wang, Lian-Tao Wang, Ren-Jie Wang, Nikola Whallon, Steven Worm, Mengqing Wu, Sau Lan Wu, Hongtao Yang, Yong Yang, Shin-Shan Yu, Bryan Zaldivar, Marco Zanetti, Zhiqing Zhang, Alberto Zucchetta
    July 3, 2015 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report also addresses how to apply the Effective Field Theory formalism for collider searches and present the results of such interpretations.
  • At a distance of 50 kpc and with a dark matter mass of $\sim10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a natural target for indirect dark matter searches. We use five years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and updated models of the gamma-ray emission from standard astrophysical components to search for a dark matter annihilation signal from the LMC. We perform a rotation curve analysis to determine the dark matter distribution, setting a robust minimum on the amount of dark matter in the LMC, which we use to set conservative bounds on the annihilation cross section. The LMC emission is generally very well described by the standard astrophysical sources, with at most a $1-2\sigma$ excess identified near the kinematic center of the LMC once systematic uncertainties are taken into account. We place competitive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section as a function of dark matter particle mass and annihilation channel.
  • We introduce a set of minimal simplified models for dark matter interactions with the Standard Model, connecting the two sectors via either a scalar or pseudoscalar particle. These models have a wider regime of validity for dark matter searches at the LHC than the effective field theory approach, while still allowing straightforward comparison to results from non-collider dark matter detection experiments. Such models also motivate dark matter searches in multiple correlated channels. In this paper, we constrain scalar and pseudoscalar simplified models with direct and indirect detection experiments, as well as from existing LHC searches with missing energy plus tops, bottoms, or jets, using the exact loop-induced coupling with gluons. This calculation significantly affects key differential cross sections at the LHC, and must be properly included. We make connections with the Higgs sector, and conclude with a discussion of future searches at the LHC.
  • We demonstrate that self-interacting dark matter models with interactions mediated by light particles can have significant deviations in the matter power-spectrum and detailed structure of galactic halos when compared to a standard cold dark matter scenario. While these deviations can take the form of suppression of small scale structure that are in some ways similar to that of warm dark matter, the self-interacting models have a much wider range of possible phenomenology. A long-range force in the dark matter can introduce multiple scales to the initial power spectrum, in the form of dark acoustic oscillations and an exponential cut-off in the power spectrum. Using simulations we show that the impact of these scales can remain observationally relevant up to the present day. Furthermore, the self-interaction can continue to modify the small-scale structure of the dark matter halos, reducing their central densities and creating a dark matter core. The resulting phenomenology is unique to this type of models.
  • A signature often found in non-minimal Higgs sectors is Higgs decay to a new gauge-singlet scalar, followed by decays of the singlets into Standard Model fermions through small mixing angles. The scalar decay can naturally be displaced from the primary vertex. The present experimental constraints on such models are extremely weak, due to low (or zero) trigger rates for the resulting low $p_T$ displaced jets. In this letter, we highlight the advantages of integrating into the trigger system massively parallel computing and coprocessors based on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) or the Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture. In particular, if such coprocessors are added to the LHC experiments' high level trigger systems, a fast Hough transform based triggers performed on this hardware would result in significant improvement to displaced searches, sufficient to discover long-lived Higgs models with a small amount of luminosity in Run II at the 14 TeV LHC.
  • The most natural supersymmetric solution to the hierarchy problem prefers the scalar top partner to be close in mass to the top quark. Experimental searches exclude top squarks across a wide range of masses, but a gap remains when the difference between the masses of the stop and the lightest supersymmetric particle is close to the top mass. We propose to search for stops in this regime by exploiting the azimuthal angular correlation of forward tagging jets in (s)top pair production. As shown in earlier work, this correlation is sensitive to the spin of the heavy states, allowing one to distinguish between top and stop pair production. Here, we demonstrate that this angular information can give a statistically significant stop pair production signal in the upcoming LHC run. While the appropriate simulation including parton showering and detector simulation requires some care, we find stable predictions for the angular correlation using multi-jet merging.
  • In supersymmetric models with an unbroken R-symmetry (rather than only R-parity), the neutralinos are Dirac fermions rather than Majorana. In this article, we discuss the phenomenology of neutralino dark matter in such models, including the calculation of the thermal relic abundance, and constraints and prospects for direct and indirect searches. Due to the large elastic scattering cross sections with nuclei predicted in R-symmetric models, we are forced to consider a neutralino that is predominantly bino, with very little higgsino mixing. We find a large region of parameter space in which bino-like Dirac neutralinos with masses between 10 and 380 GeV can annihilate through slepton exchange to provide a thermal relic abundance in agreement with the observed cosmological density, without relying on coannihilations or resonant annihilations. The signatures for the indirect detection of Dirac neutralinos are very different than predicted in the Majorana case, with annihilations proceeding dominately to $\tau^+ \tau^-$, $\mu^+ \mu^-$ and $e^+ e^-$ final states, without the standard chirality suppression. And unlike Majorana dark matter candidates, Dirac neutralinos experience spin-independent scattering with nuclei through vector couplings (via $Z$ and squark exchange), leading to potentially large rates at direct detection experiments. These and other characteristics make Dirac neutralinos potentially interesting within the context of recent direct and indirect detection anomalies. We also discuss the case in which the introduction of a small Majorana mass term breaks the $R$-symmetry, splitting the Dirac neutralino into a pair of nearly degenerate Majorana states.
  • We show that associated production of a Higgs with a top pair can be observed in purely hadronic decays. Reconstructing the top quarks in the form of jet buckets allows us to control QCD backgrounds as well as signal combinatorics. The background can be measured from side bands in the reconstructed Higgs mass. We back up our claims with a detailed study of the QCD event simulation, both for the signal and for the backgrounds.
  • Direct searches for electroweak pair production of new particles at the LHC are a difficult proposition, due to the large background and low signal cross sections. We demonstrate how these searches can be improved by a combination of new razor variables and shape analysis of signal and background kinematics. We assume that the pair-produced particles decay to charged leptons and missing energy, either directly or through a W boson. In both cases the final state is a pair of opposite sign leptons plus missing transverse energy. We estimate exclusion reach in terms of sleptons and charginos as realized in minimal supersymmetry. We compare this super-razor approach in detail to analyses based on other kinematic variables, showing how the super-razor uses more of the relevant kinematic information while achieving higher selection efficiency on signals, including cases with compressed spectra.
  • Several direct detection experiments have reported positive signals consistent with a dark matter particle with a mass of approximately 7-9 GeV and a spin independent scattering cross section of 2.5-4.8 x 10^-41 cm^2. These results do not rise to the level of discovery, but assuming that they are due to dark matter, some questions about the underlying physics can already be addressed. In this paper, I apply the effective operator formalism for dark matter-Standard Model interactions to the results of the CoGeNT and CDMS silicon target experiments. I demonstrate that only one set of flavor-blind effective operators between dark matter can quarks can be consistent with the reported results in all energy regimes of interest, namely thermal freeze-out, nuclear scattering, indirect detection, and TeV-scale colliders. This set of operators implies large couplings of dark matter with heavy quarks. The alternative implies either that the new physics has non-trivial flavor structure, that the effective formalism is not applicable and so contains new states in the spectrum accessible at the LHC, or has large annihilation channels (possibly via effective operators) into non-colored Standard Model particles.