• We introduce techniques for exploring the functionality of a neural network and extracting simple, human-readable approximations to its performance. By performing gradient ascent on the input space of the network, we are able to produce large populations of artificial events which strongly excite a given classifier. By studying the populations of these events, we then directly produce what are essentially contour maps of the network's classification function. Combined with a suite of tools for identifying the input dimensions deemed most important by the network, we can utilize these maps to efficiently interpret the dominant criteria by which the network makes its classification. As a test case, we study networks trained to discriminate supersymmetric stop production in the dilepton channel from Standard Model backgrounds. In the case of a heavy stop decaying to a light neutralino, we find individual neurons with large mutual information with $m_{T2}^{\ell\ell}$, a human-designed variable for optimizing the analysis. The network selects events with significant missing $p_T$ oriented azimuthally away from both leptons, efficiently rejecting $t\overline{t}$ background. In the case of a light stop with three-body decays to $Wb{\widetilde \chi}$ and little phase space, we find neurons that smoothly interpolate between a similar top-rejection strategy and an ISR-tagging strategy allowing for more missing momentum. We also find that a neural network trained on a stealth stop parameter point learns novel angular correlations.
  • We study ultraviolet cutoffs associated with the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) and Sublattice Weak Gravity Conjecture (sLWGC). There is a magnetic WGC cutoff at the energy scale $e G_N^{-1/2}$ with an associated sLWGC tower of charged particles. A more fundamental cutoff is the scale at which gravity becomes strong and field theory breaks down entirely. By clarifying the nature of the sLWGC for nonabelian gauge groups we derive a parametric upper bound on this strong gravity scale for arbitrary gauge theories. Intriguingly, we show that in theories approximately saturating the sLWGC, the scales at which loop corrections from the tower of charged particles to the gauge boson and graviton propagators become important are parametrically identical. This suggests a picture in which gauge fields emerge from the quantum gravity scale by integrating out a tower of charged matter fields. We derive a converse statement: if a gauge theory becomes strongly coupled at or below the quantum gravity scale, the WGC follows. We sketch some phenomenological consequences of the UV cutoffs we derive.
  • The Ooguri-Vafa Swampland Conjectures claim that in any consistent theory of quantum gravity, when venturing to large distances in scalar field space, a tower of particles will become light at a rate that is exponential in the field space distance. We provide a novel viewpoint on this claim: if we assume that a tower of states becomes light near a particular point in field space, and we further demand that loop corrections drive both gravity and the scalar to strong coupling at a common energy scale, then the requirement that the particles become light exponentially fast in the field-space distance in Planck units follows automatically. Furthermore, the same assumption of a common strong-coupling scale for scalar fields and gravitons implies that when a scalar field evolves over a super-Planckian distance, the average particle mass changes by an amount of order the cutoff energy. This supports earlier suggestions that significantly super-Planckian excursions in field space cannot be described within a single effective field theory. We comment on the relationship of our results to the Weak Gravity Conjecture.
  • The QCD axion's coupling to photons is often assumed to lie in a narrow band as a function of the axion mass. We demonstrate that several simple mechanisms, in addition to the photophilic clockwork axion already in the literature, can significantly extend the allowed range of couplings. Some mechanisms we present generalize the KNP alignment scenario, widely studied as a model of inflation, to the phenomenology of a QCD axion. In particular we present KSVZ-like realizations of two-axion KNP alignment and of the clockwork mechanism. Such a "confinement tower" realization of clockwork may prove useful in a variety of model-building contexts. We also show that kinetic mixing of the QCD axion with a lighter axion-like particle can dramatically alter the QCD axion's coupling to photons, differing from the other models we present by allowing non-quantized couplings. The simple models that we present fully cover the range of axion-photon couplings that could be probed by experiments. They motivate growing axion detection efforts over a wide space of masses and couplings.
  • The Higgs potential appears to be fine-tuned, hence very sensitive to values of other scalar fields that couple to the Higgs. We show that this feature can lead to a new epoch in the early universe featuring violent dynamics coupling the Higgs to a scalar modulus. The oscillating modulus drives tachyonic Higgs particle production. We find a simple parametric understanding of when this process can lead to rapid modulus fragmentation, resulting in gravitational wave production. A nontrivial equation-of-state arising from the nonlinear dynamics also affects the time elapsed from inflation to the CMB, influencing fits of inflationary models. Supersymmetric theories automatically contain useful ingredients for this picture.
  • Electroweak WIMPs are under intense scrutiny from direct detection, indirect detection, and collider experiments. Nonetheless the pure (pseudo-Dirac) higgsino, one of the simplest such WIMPs, remains elusive. We present an up-to-date assessment of current experimental constraints on neutralino dark matter. The strongest bound on pure higgsino dark matter currently may arise from AMS-02 measurements of antiprotons, though the interpretation of these results has sizable uncertainty. We discuss whether future astrophysical observations could offer novel ways to test higgsino dark matter, especially in the challenging regime with order MeV mass splitting between the two neutral higgsinos. We find that heating of white dwarfs by annihilation of higgsinos captured via inelastic scattering could be one useful probe, although it will require challenging observations of distant dwarf galaxies or a convincing case to be made for substantial dark matter content in Omega Centauri, a globular cluster that may be a remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy. White dwarfs and neutron stars give a target for astronomical observations that could eventually help to close the last, most difficult corner of parameter space for dark matter with weak interactions.
  • We discuss electric dipole moments (EDMs) in the framework of CP-violating natural supersymmetry (SUSY). Recent experimental results have significantly tightened constraints on the EDMs of electrons and of mercury, and substantial further progress is expected in the near future. We assess how these results constrain the parameter space of natural SUSY. In addition to our discussion of SUSY, we provide a set of general formulas for two-loop fermion EDMs, which can be applied to a wide range of models of new physics. In the SUSY context, the two-loop effects of stops and charginos respectively constrain the phases of $A_t \mu$ and $M_2 \mu$ to be small in the natural part of parameter space. If the Higgs mass is lifted to 125 GeV by a new tree-level superpotential interaction and soft term with CP-violating phases, significant EDMs can arise from the two-loop effects of $W$ bosons and tops. We compare the bounds arising from EDMs to those from other probes of new physics including colliders, $b \to s \gamma$, and dark matter searches. Importantly, improvements in reach not only constrain higher masses, but require the phases to be significantly smaller in the natural parameter space at low mass. The required smallness of phases sharpens the CP problem of natural SUSY model building.
  • The Weak Gravity Conjecture postulates the existence of superextremal charged particles, i.e. those with mass smaller than or equal to their charge in Planck units. We present further evidence for our recent observation that in known examples a much stronger statement is true: an infinite tower of superextremal particles of different charges exists. We show that effective Kaluza-Klein field theories and perturbative string vacua respect the Sublattice Weak Gravity Conjecture, namely that a finite index sublattice of the full charge lattice exists with a superextremal particle at each site. In perturbative string theory we show that this follows from modular invariance. However, we present counterexamples to the stronger possibility that a superextremal particle exists at every lattice site, including an example in which the lightest charged particle is subextremal. The Sublattice Weak Gravity Conjecture has many implications both for abstract theories of quantum gravity and for real-world physics. For instance, it implies that if a gauge group with very small coupling $e$ exists, then the fundamental gravitational cutoff energy of the theory is no higher than $\sim e^{1/3} M_{\rm Pl}$.
  • Future hadron colliders will have a remarkable capacity to discover massive new particles, but their capabilities for precision measurements of couplings that can reveal underlying mechanisms have received less study. In this work we study the capability of future hadron colliders to shed light on a precise, focused question: is the higgs mass of 125 GeV explained by the MSSM? If supersymmetry is realized near the TeV scale, a future hadron collider could produce huge numbers of gluinos and electroweakinos. We explore whether precision measurements of their properties could allow inference of the scalar masses and $\tan \beta$ with sufficient accuracy to test whether physics beyond the MSSM is needed to explain the higgs mass. We also discuss dark matter direct detection and precision higgs physics as complementary probes of $\tan \beta$. For concreteness, we focus on the mini-split regime of MSSM parameter space at a 100 TeV $pp$ collider, with scalar masses ranging from 10s to about 1000 TeV.
  • Theories with approximate no-scale structure, such as the Large Volume Scenario, have a distinctive hierarchy of multiple mass scales in between TeV gaugino masses and the Planck scale, which we call SUSY's Ladder. This is a particular realization of Split Supersymmetry in which the same small parameter suppresses gaugino masses relative to scalar soft masses, scalar soft masses relative to the gravitino mass, and the UV cutoff or string scale relative to the Planck scale. This scenario has many phenomenologically interesting properties, and can avoid dangers including the gravitino problem, flavor problems, and the moduli-induced LSP problem that plague other supersymmetric theories. We study SUSY's Ladder using a superspace formalism that makes the mysterious cancelations in previous computations manifest. This opens the possibility of a consistent effective field theory understanding of the phenomenology of these scenarios, based on power-counting in the small ratio of string to Planck scales. We also show that four-dimensional theories with approximate no-scale structure enforced by a single volume modulus arise only from two special higher-dimensional theories: five-dimensional supergravity and ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity. This gives a phenomenological argument in favor of ten dimensional ultraviolet physics which is different from standard arguments based on the consistency of superstring theory.
  • Sept. 10, 2016 hep-ph
    I give an overview of the physics potential at possible future $e^+ e^-$ colliders, including the ILC, FCC-ee, and CEPC. The goal is to explain some of the measurements that can be done in the context of electroweak precision tests and Higgs couplings, to compare some of the options under consideration, and to put the measurements in context by summarizing their implications for some new physics scenarios. This is a writeup of a plenary talk at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study Program on High Energy Physics Conference, January 18--21, 2016. Some previously unpublished electroweak precision results for FCC-ee and CEPC are included.
  • Dark matter may be coupled to dark radiation: light degrees of freedom that mediate forces between dark sector particles. Cosmological constraints favor dark radiation that is colder than Standard Model radiation. In models with fixed couplings between dark matter and the Standard Model, these constraints can be difficult to satisfy if thermal equilibrium is assumed in the early universe. We construct a model of asymmetric reheating of the visible and dark sectors from late decays of a long-lived particle (for instance, a modulus). We show, as a proof-of-principle, that such a model can populate a sufficiently cold dark sector while also generating baryon and dark matter asymmetries through the out of equilibrium decay. We frame much of our discussion in terms of the scenario of dissipative dark matter, as in the Double-Disk Dark Matter scenario. However, our results may also be of interest for other scenarios like the Twin Higgs model that are in danger of overproducing dark radiation due to nonnegligible dark-visible couplings.
  • Common features of known quantum gravity theories may hint at the general nature of quantum gravity. The absence of continuous global symmetries is one such feature. This inspired the Weak Gravity Conjecture, which bounds masses of charged particles. We propose the Lattice Weak Gravity Conjecture, which further requires the existence of an infinite tower of particles of all possible charges under both abelian and nonabelian gauge groups and directly implies a cutoff for quantum field theory. It holds in a wide variety of string theory examples and has testable consequences for the real world and for pure mathematics. We sketch some implications of these ideas for models of inflation, for the QCD axion (and LIGO), for conformal field theory, and for algebraic geometry.
  • We investigate the behavior of the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) under toroidal compactification and RG flows, finding evidence that WGC bounds for single photons become weaker in the infrared. By contrast, we find that a photon satisfying the WGC will not necessarily satisfy it after toroidal compactification when black holes charged under the Kaluza-Klein photons are considered. Doing so either requires an infinite number of states of different charges to satisfy the WGC in the original theory or a restriction on allowed compactification radii. These subtleties suggest that if the Weak Gravity Conjecture is true, we must seek a stronger form of the conjecture that is robust under compactification. We propose a "Lattice Weak Gravity Conjecture" that meets this requirement: a superextremal particle should exist for every charge in the charge lattice. The perturbative heterotic string satisfies this conjecture. We also use compactification to explore the extent to which the WGC applies to axions. We argue that gravitational instanton solutions in theories of axions coupled to dilaton-like fields are analogous to extremal black holes, motivating a WGC for axions. This is further supported by a match between the instanton action and that of wrapped black branes in a higher-dimensional UV completion.
  • We propose a framework of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model that can ameliorate both the SUSY Higgs mass problem and the missing superpartner problem. New vectorlike matter fields couple to the Higgs and provide new loop contributions to its mass. New Yukawa couplings are sizable and large supersymmetry breaking is not needed to lift the Higgs mass. To avoid a Landau pole for the new Yukawa couplings, these fields are charged under a new gauge group, which confines and leads to a Hidden Valley-like phenomenology. The Hidden Valley sector is almost supersymmetric and ordinary sparticles decay to exotic new states which decay back to Standard Model particles and gravitinos with reduced missing energy. We construct a simplified model to simulate this scenario and find a viable parameter space of specific benchmark models which ameliorates both of the major phenomenological problems with supersymmetry.
  • We consider the immediate or near-term experimental opportunities offered by some scenarios that could explain the new diphoton excess at the LHC. If the excess is due to a new particle $X_s$ at 750 GeV, additional new particles are required, providing further signals. If connected with naturalness, the $X_s$ may be produced in top partner decays. Then a $t'\bar t'$ signal, with $t'\to t X_s$ and $X_s\to gg$ dominantly, might be discovered by reinterpreting 13 TeV SUSY searches in multijet events with low MET and/or a lepton. If $X_s$ is a bound state of quirks, the signal events may be accompanied by an unusual number of soft tracks or soft jets. Other resonances including dilepton and photon+jet as well as dijet may lie at or above this mass, and signatures of hidden glueballs might also be observable. If the "photons" in the excess are actually long-lived particles decaying to photon pairs or to electron pairs, there are opportunities for detecting overlapping photons and/or unusual patterns of apparent photon-conversions in either $X_s$ or 125 GeV Higgs decays. There is also the possibility of events with a hard "photon" recoiling against a narrow isolated HCAL-only "jet", which, after the jet's energy is corrected for its electromagnetic origin, would show a peak at 750 GeV.
  • Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator ${\cal O}_{\mu \nu}$ that mixes with the hypercharge field strength and couples to dark matter tensor currents, which has an interesting viable parameter space. We describe the effect of such mediators on the cross sections and recoil energy spectra that could be observed in direct detection.
  • In Stealth Supersymmetry, bounds on superpartners from direct searches can be notably weaker than in standard supersymmetric scenarios, due to suppressed missing energy. We present a set of simplified models of Stealth Supersymmetry that motivate 13 TeV LHC searches. We focus on simplified models within the Natural Supersymmetry framework, in which the gluino, stop, and Higgsino are assumed to be lighter than other superpartners. Our simplified models exhibit novel decay patterns that differ significantly from topologies of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, with and without $R$-parity. We determine limits on stops and gluinos from searches at the 8 TeV LHC. Existing searches constitute a powerful probe of Stealth Supersymmetry gluinos with certain topologies. However, we identify simplified models where the gluino can be considerably lighter than 1 TeV. Stops are significantly less constrained in Stealth Supersymmetry than the MSSM, and we have identified novel stop decay topologies that are completely unconstrained by existing LHC searches.
  • Models of large-field inflation based on axion-like fields with shift symmetries can be simple and natural, and make a promising prediction of detectable primordial gravitational waves. The Weak Gravity Conjecture is known to constrain the simplest case in which a single compact axion descends from a gauge field in an extra dimension. We argue that the Weak Gravity Conjecture also constrains a variety of theories of multiple compact axions including N-flation and some alignment models. We show that other alignment models entail surprising consequences for how the mass spectrum of the theory varies across the axion moduli space, and hence can be excluded if further conjectures hold. In every case that we consider, plausible assumptions lead to field ranges that cannot be parametrically larger than the Planck scale. Our results are strongly suggestive of a general inconsistency in models of large-field inflation based on compact axions, and possibly of a more general principle forbidding super-Planckian field ranges.
  • Testing the idea of naturalness is and will continue to be one of the most important goals of high energy physics experiments. It will play a central role in the physics program of future colliders. In this paper, we present projections of the reach of natural SUSY at future lepton colliders: CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC. We focus on the observables which give the strongest reach, the electroweak precision observables (for left-handed stops), and Higgs to gluon and photon decay rates (for both left- and right-handed stops). There is a "blind spot" when the stop mixing parameter Xt is approximately equal to the average stop mass. We argue that in natural scenarios, bounds on the heavy Higgs bosons from tree-level mixing effects that modify the bottom Yukawa coupling together with bounds from b to s gamma play a complementary role in probing the blind spot region. For specific natural SUSY scenarios such as folded SUSY in which the top partners do not carry Standard Model color charges, electroweak precision observables could be the most sensitive probe. In all the scenarios discussed in this paper, the combined set of precision measurements will probe down to a few percent in fine-tuning.
  • The future of high-precision electroweak physics lies in e+e- collider measurements of properties of the Z boson, the W boson, the Higgs boson, and the top quark. We estimate the expected performance of three possible future colliders: the ILC, FCC-ee (formerly known as TLEP), and CEPC. In particular, we present the first estimates of the possible reach of CEPC, China's proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, for the oblique parameters S and T and for seven-parameter fits of Higgs couplings. These results allow the physics potential for CEPC to be compared with that of the ILC and FCC-ee. We also show how the constraints on S and T would evolve as the uncertainties on each of the most important input measurements change separately. This clarifies the basic physics goals for future colliders. To improve on the current precision, the highest priorities are improving the uncertainties on the W mass and effective weak mixing angle. At the same time, improved measurements of the top mass, the Z mass, the running of alpha, and the Z width will offer further improvement which will determine the ultimate reach. Each of the possible future colliders we consider has strong prospects for probing TeV-scale electroweak physics.
  • We explore naturalness constraints on the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons H^0, H^+/-, and A^0 in supersymmetric theories. We show that, in any extension of MSSM which accommodates the 125 GeV Higgs at the tree level, one can derive an upper bound on the SUSY Higgs masses from naturalness considerations. As is well-known for the MSSM, these bounds become weak at large tan beta. However, we show that measurements of b to s gamma together with naturalness arguments lead to an upper bound on tan beta, strengthening the naturalness case for heavy Higgs states near the TeV scale. The precise bound depends somewhat on the SUSY mediation scale: allowing a factor of 10 tuning in the stop sector, the measured rate of b to s gamma implies tan beta < 30 for running down from 10 TeV but tan beta < 4 for mediation at or above 100 TeV, placing m_A near the TeV scale for natural EWSB. Because the signatures of heavy Higgs bosons at colliders are less susceptible to being "hidden" than standard superpartner signatures, there is a strong motivation to make heavy Higgs searches a key part of the LHC's search for naturalness. In an appendix we comment on how the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem links the rates for H to hh and H to ZZ signatures.
  • We present a simple new way to visualize the constraints of Higgs coupling measurements on light stops in natural SUSY scenarios beyond the MSSM, which works directly in the plane of stop mass eigenvalues (with no need to make assumptions about mixing angles). For given stop mass eigenvalues, the smallest value of $X_t$ that can bring the correction to the $h \to gg$ and $h\to \gamma\gamma$ couplings into agreement with data is computed. Requiring that this $X_t$ is consistent--i.e. that the chosen mass eigenvalues can be the outcome of diagonalizing a matrix with a given off-diagonal term--rules out the possibility that both stops have a mass below $\approx$ 400 GeV. Requiring that $X_t$ is not fine-tuned for agreement with the data shows that neither stop can be lighter than $\approx$ 100 GeV. These constraints are interesting because, unlike direct searches, they apply no matter how stops decay, and suggest a minimum electroweak fine-tuning of between a factor of 5 and 10. We show that a multi-parameter fit can slightly weaken this conclusion by allowing a large Higgs coupling to $b$-quarks, but only if a second Higgs boson is within reach of experiment. Certain models, like $R$-symmetric models with Dirac gauginos, are much more strongly constrained because they predict negligible $X_t$. We illustrate how the constraints will evolve given precise measurements at future colliders (HL-LHC, ILC, and TLEP), and comment on the more difficult case of Folded Supersymmetry.
  • We survey operators that can lead to a keV photon line from dark matter decay or annihilation. We are motivated in part by recent claims of an unexplained 3.5 keV line in galaxy clusters and in Andromeda, but our results could apply to any hypothetical line observed in this energy range. We find that given the amount of flux that is observable, explanations in terms of decay are more plausible than annihilation, at least if the annihilation is directly to Standard Model states rather than intermediate particles. The decay case can be explained by a scalar or pseudoscalar field coupling to photons suppressed by a scale not far below the reduced Planck mass, which can be taken as a tantalizing hint of high-scale physics. The scalar case is particularly interesting from the effective field theory viewpoint, and we discuss it at some length. Because of a quartically divergent mass correction, naturalness strongly suggests the theory should be cut off at or below the 1000 TeV scale. The most plausible such natural UV completion would involve supersymmetry. These bottom-up arguments reproduce expectations from top-down considerations of the physics of moduli. A keV line could also arise from the decay of a sterile neutrino, in which case a renormalizable UV completion exists and no direct inference about high-scale physics is possible.
  • Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35 million year periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic cratering with more confidence than by evaluating the data without an underlying model. We find that, marginalizing over astrophysical uncertainties, the likelihood ratio for such a model relative to one with a constant cratering rate is 3.0, which moderately favors the dark disk model. Our analysis furthermore yields a posterior distribution that, based on current crater data, singles out a dark matter disk surface density of approximately 10 solar masses per square parsec. The geological record thereby motivates a particular model of dark matter that will be probed in the near future.