• Various fundamental-physics experiments such as measurement of the birefringence of the vacuum, searches for ultralight dark matter (e.g., axions), and precision spectroscopy of complex systems (including exotic atoms containing antimatter constituents) are enabled by high-field magnets. We give an overview of current and future experiments and discuss the state-of-the-art DC- and pulsed-magnet technologies and prospects for future developments.
  • In this paper, the design and the performance of a prototype detector based on MicroMegas technology with two detection planes in a common gas volume is discussed. The detector is suited for the forward region of LHC detectors, addressing the high-rate environment and limited available space. Each detection plane has an active area of 9x9 cm^2 with a two-dimensional strip readout and is separated by a common gas region with a height of 14 mm. A micro-mesh, working as a cathode, is placed in the middle of the common gas volume separating it into two individual cells. This setup allows for an angle reconstruction of incoming particles with a precision of 2 mrad. Since this design reduces the impact of multiple scattering effects by the reduced material budget, possible applications for low energy beam experiments can be envisioned. The performance of the prototype detector has been tested with a 4.4 GeV electron beam, provided by the test beam facility at DESY.
  • The total $W$-boson decay width $\Gamma_W$ is an important observable which allows testing of the standard model. The current world average value is based on direct measurements of final state kinematic properties of $W$-boson decays, and has a relative uncertainty of 2%. The indirect determination of $\Gamma_W$ via the cross-section measurements of vector-boson production can lead to a similar accuracy. The same methodology leads also to a determination of the leptonic branching ratio. This approach has been successfully pursued by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, as well as by the CMS collaboration at the LHC. In this paper we present for the first time a combination of the available measurements at hadron colliders, accounting for the correlations of the associated systematic uncertainties. Our combination leads to values of $\textrm{BR}(W\rightarrow\mu\nu)=(10.72 \pm 0.16)\%$ and $\Gamma_W = 2113 \pm 31$ MeV, respectively, both compatible with the current world averages.
  • The measurement of the transverse momentum of W bosons in hadron collisions provides not only an important test of QCD calculations, but also is an important input for the precision measurement of the W boson mass. While the measurement of the Z boson transverse momentum is experimentally well under control, the available unfolding techniques for the W boson final states lead generically to relatively large uncertainties. In this paper, we present a new methodology to estimate the W boson transverse momentum spectrum, significantly improving the systematic uncertainties of current approaches.
  • We report on the construction and initial performance studies of two micromegas detector quadruplets with an area of 0.5 m$^2$. They serve as prototypes for the planned upgrade project of the ATLAS muon system. Their design is based on the resistive-strip technology and thus renders the detectors spark tolerant. Each quadruplet comprises four detection layers with 1024 readout strips and a strip pitch of 415 $\mu$m. In two out of the four layers the strips are inclined by $\pm$1.5$^{\circ}$ to allow for the measurement of a second coordinate. We present the detector concept and report on the experience gained during the detector construction. In addition an evaluation of the detector performance with cosmic rays and test-beam data is given.
  • In this paper, the design and the performance of two prototype detectors based on Micromegas technology with a pad readout geometry is discussed. In addition, two alternative implementations of a spark-resistent protection layer on top of the readout pads have been tested to optimize the charge-up behavior of the detector under high rates. The prototype detectors consist of 500 pads with a size of 5x4 mm, each connected to one independent readout channel, and cover an active area of 10x10 cm. The design of these prototypes and its associated readout infrastructure was developed in such a way that it can be easily adapted for large-size detector concepts.
  • This review article summarizes results on the production cross section measurements of electroweak boson pairs ($WW$, $WZ$, $ZZ$, $W\gamma$ and $Z\gamma$) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\sqrt{s}=7$ \TeV. The two general-purpose detectors at the LHC, ATLAS and CMS, recorded an integrated luminosity of $5fb^{-1}$ in 2011, which offered the possibility to study the properties of diboson production to high precision. These measurements test predictions of the Standard Model (SM) in a new energy regime and are crucial for the understanding and the measurement of the SM Higgs boson and other new particles. In this review, special emphasis is drawn on the combination of results from both experiments and a common interpretation with respect to state-of-the-art SM predictions.
  • In recent years, micropattern gaseous detectors, which comprise a two-dimensional readout structure within one PCB layer, received significant attention in the development of precision and cost-effective tracking detectors in medium and high energy physics experiments. In this article, we present for the first time a systematic performance study of the signal characteristics of a resistive strip micromegas detector with a two-dimensional readout, based on test-beam and X-ray measurements. In particular, comparisons of the response of the two independent readout-layers regarding their signal shapes and signal reconstruction efficiencies are discussed.
  • This review summarises the main results on the production of single vector bosons in the Standard Model, both inclusively and in association with light and heavy flavour jets, at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The general purpose detectors at this collider, ATLAS and CMS, each recorded an integrated luminosity of $\approx 40\,{\rm pb^{-1}}$ and $5\,{\rm fb^{-1}}$ in the years 2010 and 2011, respectively. The corresponding data offer the unique possibility to precisely study the properties of the production of heavy vector bosons in a new energy regime. The accurate understanding of the Standard Model is not only crucial for searches of unknown particles and phenomena but also to test predictions of perturbative Quantum-Chromo-Dynamics calculations and for precision measurements of observables in the electroweak sector. Results from a variety of measurements in which single W or Z bosons are identified are reviewed. Special emphasis in this review is given to interpretations of the experimental results in the context of state-of-the-art predictions.
  • The Muon ATLAS MicroMegas Activity (MAMMA) focuses on the development and testing of large-area muon detectors based on the bulk-Micromegas technology. These detectors are candidates for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon System in view of the luminosity upgrade of Large Hadron Collider at CERN (sLHC). They will combine trigger and precision measurement capability in a single device. A novel protection scheme using resistive strips above the readout electrode has been developed. The response and sparking properties of resistive Micromegas detectors were successfully tested in a mixed (neutron and gamma) high radiation field, in a X-ray test facility, in hadron beams, and in the ATLAS cavern. Finally, we introduced a 2-dimensional readout structure in the resistive Micromegas and studied the detector response with X-rays.
  • Recent intensive theoretical and experimental studies shed light on possible new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics, which can be probed with sub-eV energy experiments. In the second run of the OSQAR photon regeneration experiment, which looks for the conversion of photon to axion (or Axion-Like Particle), two spare superconducting dipole magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been used. In this paper we report on first results obtained from a light beam propagating in vacuum within the 9 T field of two LHC dipole magnets. No excess of events above the background was detected and the two-photon couplings of possible new scalar and pseudo-scalar particles could be constrained.
  • The possibility to determine the recorded integrated luminosity via the measurements of the W and Z boson production cross-sections with the ATLAS detector is discussed. The current results based on 2010 data are briefly summarized. Special attention is drawn to theoretical uncertainties of the measurement. The latter give a large contribution to the systematic uncertainties of the measurements. An outlook on the expected precision of an analysis based on 1fb-1 is given and the implications on a possible luminosity determination are discussed.
  • In view of recent discussions concerning the possibly limiting energy resolution systematics on the measurement of the Z boson transverse momentum distribution at hadron colliders, we propose a novel measurement method based on the angular distributions of the decay leptons. We also introduce a phenomenological parametrization of the transverse momentum distribution that adapts well to all currently available predictions, a useful tool to quantify their differences.