• This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • We use the deep CANDELS observations in the GOODS North and South fields to revisit the correlations between stellar mass ($M_*$), star--formation rate (SFR) and morphology, and to introduce a fourth dimension, the mass-weighted stellar age, in galaxies at $1.2<z<4$. We do this by making new measures of $M_*$, $SFR$, and stellar age thanks to an improved SED fitting procedure that allows various star formation history for each galaxy. Like others, we find that the slope of the Main Sequence (MS) of star formation in the $(M_*;SFR)$ plane bends at high mass. We observe clear morphological differences among galaxies across the MS, which also correlate with stellar age. At all redshifts, galaxies that are quenching or quenched, and thus old, have high $\Sigma_1$ (the projected density within the central 1 kpc), while younger, star-forming galaxies span a much broader range of $\Sigma_1$, which includes the high values observed for quenched galaxies, but also extends to much lower values. As galaxies age and quench, the stellar age and the dispersion of $\Sigma_1$ for fixed values of $M_{*}$ shows two different regimes, one, at the low--mass end, where quenching might be driven by causes external to the galaxies; the other, at the high--mass end, where quenching is driven by internal causes, very likely the mass given the low scatter of $\Sigma_1$ (mass quenching). We suggest that the monotonic increase of central density as galaxies grow is one manifestation of a more general phenomenon of structural transformation that galaxies undergo as they evolve.
  • Studying giant star-forming clumps in distant galaxies is important to understand galaxy formation and evolution. At present, however, observers and theorists have not reached a consensus on whether the observed "clumps" in distant galaxies are the same phenomenon that is seen in simulations. In this paper, as a step to establish a benchmark of direct comparisons between observations and theories, we publish a sample of clumps constructed to represent the commonly observed "clumps" in the literature. This sample contains 3193 clumps detected from 1270 galaxies at $0.5 \leq z < 3.0$. The clumps are detected from rest-frame UV images, as described in our previous paper. Their physical properties, e.g., rest-frame color, stellar mass (M*), star formation rate (SFR), age, and dust extinction, are measured by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) to synthetic stellar population models. We carefully test the procedures of measuring clump properties, especially the method of subtracting background fluxes from the diffuse component of galaxies. With our fiducial background subtraction, we find a radial clump U-V color variation, where clumps close to galactic centers are redder than those in outskirts. The slope of the color gradient (clump color as a function of their galactocentric distance scaled by the semi-major axis of galaxies) changes with redshift and M* of the host galaxies: at a fixed M*, the slope becomes steeper toward low redshift, and at a fixed redshift, it becomes slightly steeper with M*. Based on our SED-fitting, this observed color gradient can be explained by a combination of a negative age gradient, a negative E(B-V) gradient, and a positive specific star formation rate gradient of the clumps. We also find that the color gradients of clumps are steeper than those of intra-clump regions. [Abridged]
  • We examine the fraction of massive ($M_{*}>10^{10} M_{\odot}$), compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at $z\sim2$. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that $39.2^{+3.9}_{-3.6}$\% (65/166) of cSFGs at $1.4<z<3.0$ host an X-ray detected AGN. This fraction is 3.2 times higher than the incidence of AGN in extended star-forming galaxies with similar masses at these redshifts. This difference is significant at the $6.2\sigma$ level. Our results are consistent with models in which cSFGs are formed through a dissipative contraction that triggers a compact starburst and concurrent growth of the central black hole. We also discuss our findings in the context of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations that require feedback energy to rapidly quench cSFGs. We show that the AGN fraction peaks precisely where energy injection is needed to reproduce the decline in the number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive, quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe K$\alpha$ line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities $N_H$, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10~keV luminosities $L_X$ for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on time scales of years. We find that the $N_H$ variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and $N_H$ can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing $N_H$. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of $N_H$ for the CDF-S AGN population and present re-selected subsamples which are complete with respect to $N_H$. The $N_H$-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of $N_H$ on $L_X$ and on redshift. Combining our data with that from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anti-correlation between the average $N_H$ and $L_X$ of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as $f_{obscured}\thickapprox 0.42\ (1+z)^{0.60}$.
  • We investigate the environmental quenching of galaxies, especially those with stellar masses (M*)$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, beyond the local universe. Essentially all local low-mass quenched galaxies (QGs) are believed to live close to massive central galaxies, which is a demonstration of environmental quenching. We use CANDELS data to test {\it whether or not} such a dwarf QG--massive central galaxy connection exists beyond the local universe. To this purpose, we only need a statistically representative, rather than a complete, sample of low-mass galaxies, which enables our study to $z\gtrsim1.5$. For each low-mass galaxy, we measure the projected distance ($d_{proj}$) to its nearest massive neighbor (M*$>10^{10.5} M_\odot$) within a redshift range. At a given redshift and M*, the environmental quenching effect is considered to be observed if the $d_{proj}$ distribution of QGs ($d_{proj}^Q$) is significantly skewed toward lower values than that of star-forming galaxies ($d_{proj}^{SF}$). For galaxies with $10^{8} M_\odot < M* < 10^{10} M_\odot$, such a difference between $d_{proj}^Q$ and $d_{proj}^{SF}$ is detected up to $z\sim1$. Also, about 10\% of the quenched galaxies in our sample are located between two and four virial radii ($R_{Vir}$) of the massive halos. The median projected distance from low-mass QGs to their massive neighbors, $d_{proj}^Q / R_{Vir}$, decreases with satellite M* at $M* \lesssim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$, but increases with satellite M* at $M* \gtrsim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$. This trend suggests a smooth, if any, transition of the quenching timescale around $M* \sim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$ at $0.5<z<1.0$.
  • We present a 0.4-8$\mu$m multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field. This catalog is built on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 and ACS data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and it incorporates the existing HST data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the 3D-HST program. The catalog is based on detections in the F160W band reaching a depth of F160W=26.62 AB (90% completeness, point-sources). It includes the photometry for 41457 objects over an area of $\approx 206$ arcmin$^2$ in the following bands: HST ACS F606W and F814W; HST WFC3 F125W, F140W and F160W; CFHT/Megacam $u^*$, $g'$, $r'$, $i'$ and $z'$; CFHT/WIRCAM $J$, $H$ and $K_\mathrm{S}$; Mayall/NEWFIRM $J1$, $J2$, $J3$, $H1$, $H2$, $K$; Spitzer IRAC $3.6\mu$m, $4.5\mu$m, $5.8\mu$m and $8.0\mu$m. We are also releasing value-added catalogs that provide robust photometric redshifts and stellar mass measurements. The catalogs are publicly available through the CANDELS repository.
  • We directly detect dust emission in an optically-detected, multiply-imaged galaxy lensed by the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. We detect two images of the same galaxy at 1.1mm with the AzTEC camera on the Large Millimeter Telescope leaving no ambiguity in the counterpart identification. This galaxy, MACS071_Az9, is at z>4 and the strong lensing model (mu=7.5) allows us to calculate an intrinsic IR luminosity of 9.7e10 Lsun and an obscured star formation rate of 14.6 +/- 4.5 Msun/yr. The unobscured star formation rate from the UV is only 4.1 +/- 0.3 Msun/yr which means the total star formation rate (18.7 +/- 4.5 Msun/yr) is dominated (75-80%) by the obscured component. With an intrinsic stellar mass of only 6.9e9Msun, MACS0717_Az9 is one of only a handful of z>4 galaxies at these lower masses that is detected in dust emission. This galaxy lies close to the estimated star formation sequence at this epoch. However, it does not lie on the dust obscuration relation (IRX-beta) for local starburst galaxies and is instead consistent with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) attenuation law. This remarkable lower mass galaxy showing signs of both low metallicity and high dust content may challenge our picture of dust production in the early Universe.
  • We report the detection of morphology dependent stellar age in massive quenched galaxies (QGs) at z~1.2. The sense of the dependence is that compact QGs are 0.5-2 Gyr older than normal-sized ones. The evidence comes from three different age indicators, Dn4000, Hdelta and fits to spectral synthesis models, applied to their stacked optical spectra. All age indicators consistently show that the stellar populations of compact QGs are older than their normally-sized counterparts. We detect weak [OII] emission in a fraction of QGs, and the strength of the line, when present, is similar between the two samples; however, compact galaxies exhibit significantly lower frequency of [OII] emission than normal ones. A fraction of both samples are individually detected in 7 Ms Chandra X-ray images (luminosities$\sim10^{40}$-$10^{41}$ erg/sec). 7 Ms stacks of non-detected galaxies show similarly low luminosities in the soft band only, consistent with a hot gas origin for the X-ray emission. While both [OII] emitters and non-emitters are also X-ray sources among normal galaxies, no compact galaxy with [OII] emission is an X-ray source, arguing against an AGN powering the line in compact galaxies. We interpret the [OII] properties as further evidence that compact galaxies are older and further along into the process of quenching star-formation and suppressing gas accretion. Finally, we argue that the older age of compact QGs is evidence of progenitor bias: compact QGs simply reflect the smaller sizes of galaxies at their earlier quenching epoch, with stellar density most likely having nothing directly to do with cessation of star-formation.
  • In this paper, we investigate the relationship between star formation and structure, using a mass-complete sample of 27,893 galaxies at $0.5<z<2.5$ selected from 3D-HST. We confirm that star-forming galaxies are larger than quiescent galaxies at fixed stellar mass (M$_{\star}$). However, in contrast with some simulations, there is only a weak relation between star formation rate (SFR) and size within the star-forming population: when dividing into quartiles based on residual offsets in SFR, we find that the sizes of star-forming galaxies in the lowest quartile are 0.27$\pm$0.06 dex smaller than the highest quartile. We show that 50% of star formation in galaxies at fixed M$_{\star}$ takes place within a narrow range of sizes (0.26 dex). Taken together, these results suggest that there is an abrupt cessation of star formation after galaxies attain particular structural properties. Confirming earlier results, we find that central stellar density within a 1 kpc fixed physical radius is the key parameter connecting galaxy morphology and star formation histories: galaxies with high central densities are red and have increasingly lower SFR/M$_{\star}$, whereas galaxies with low central densities are blue and have a roughly constant (higher) SFR/M$_{\star}$ at a given redshift. We find remarkably little scatter in the average trends and a strong evolution of $>$0.5 dex in the central density threshold correlated with quiescence from $z\sim0.7-2.0$. Neither a compact size nor high-$n$ are sufficient to assess the likelihood of quiescence for the average galaxy; rather, the combination of these two parameters together with M$_{\star}$ results in a unique quenching threshold in central density/velocity.
  • Although there has been much progress in understanding how galaxies evolve, we still do not understand how and when they stop forming stars and become quiescent. We address this by applying our galaxy spectral energy distribution models, which incorporate physically motivated star formation histories (SFHs) from cosmological simulations, to a sample of quiescent galaxies at $0.2<z<2.1$. A total of 845 quiescent galaxies with multi-band photometry spanning rest-frame ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths are selected from the CANDELS dataset. We compute median SFHs of these galaxies in bins of stellar mass and redshift. At all redshifts and stellar masses, the median SFHs rise, reach a peak, and then decline to reach quiescence. At high redshift, we find that the rise and decline are fast, as expected because the Universe is young. At low redshift, the duration of these phases depends strongly on stellar mass. Low-mass galaxies ($\log(M_{\ast}/M_{\odot})\sim9.5$) grow on average slowly, take a long time to reach their peak of star formation ($\gtrsim 4$ Gyr), and the declining phase is fast ($\lesssim 2$ Gyr). Conversely, high-mass galaxies ($\log(M_{\ast}/M_{\odot})\sim11$) grow on average fast ($\lesssim 2$ Gyr), and, after reaching their peak, decrease the star formation slowly ($\gtrsim 3$ Gyr). These findings are consistent with galaxy stellar mass being a driving factor in determining how evolved galaxies are, with high-mass galaxies being the most evolved at any time (i.e., downsizing). The different durations we observe in the declining phases also suggest that low- and high-mass galaxies experience different quenching mechanisms that operate on different timescales.
  • We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function at z=4-8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the CANDELS/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Year 1 Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations. These surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 x 10^6 Mpc^3 over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for faint (M_UV=-18) and bright (M_UV < -21) galaxies. We select candidate galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 galaxies at 3.5<z<8.5, with >1000 galaxies at z~6-8. We measure the luminosity function using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end our results agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright galaxies at z>6, with M* ~ -21 at z>5, different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift. At z=8, a single power-law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z=6 and 7, an exponential cutoff at the bright-end is moderately preferred. We compare to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in M* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright-end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density, correcting for dust attenuation, and find that it declines as (1+z)^(-4.3 +/- 0.5) at z>4, consistent with observations at z>9. Our observations are consistent with a reionization history that starts at z>10, completes at z>6, and reaches a midpoint (x_HII = 0.5) at 6.7<z<9.4. Finally, our observations predict that the abundance of bright z=9 galaxies is likely higher than previous constraints, though consistent with recent estimates of bright z~10 galaxies. [abridged]
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • In this paper we perform a comprehensive study of the main sources of random and systematic errors in stellar mass measurement for galaxies using their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). We use mock galaxy catalogs with simulated multi-waveband photometry (from U-band to mid-infrared) and known redshift, stellar mass, age and extinction for individual galaxies. Given different parameters affecting stellar mass measurement (photometric S/N ratios, SED fitting errors, systematic effects, the inherent degeneracies and correlated errors), we formulated different simulated galaxy catalogs to quantify these effects individually. We studied the sensitivity of stellar mass estimates to the codes/methods used, population synthesis models, star formation histories, nebular emission line contributions, photometric uncertainties, extinction and age. For each simulated galaxy, the difference between the input stellar masses and those estimated using different simulation catalogs, $\Delta\log(M)$, was calculated and used to identify the most fundamental parameters affecting stellar masses. We measured different components of the error budget, with the results listed as follows: (1). no significant bias was found among different codes/methods, with all having comparable scatter; (2). A source of error is found to be due to photometric uncertainties and low resolution in age and extinction grids; (3). The median of stellar masses among different methods provides a stable measure of the mass associated with any given galaxy; (4). The deviations in stellar mass strongly correlate with those in age, with a weaker correlation with extinction; (5). the scatter in the stellar masses due to free parameters are quantified, with the sensitivity of the stellar mass to both the population synthesis codes and inclusion of nebular emission lines studied.
  • We present photometry and derived redshifts from up to eleven bandpasses for 9927 galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep field (UDF), covering an observed wavelength range from the near-ultraviolet (NUV) to the near-infrared (NIR) with Hubble Space Telescope observations. Our Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/UV F225W, F275W, and F336W image mosaics from the ultra-violet UDF (UVUDF) imaging campaign are newly calibrated to correct for charge transfer inefficiency, and use new dark calibrations to minimize background gradients and pattern noise. Our NIR WFC3/IR image mosaics combine the imaging from the UDF09 and UDF12 campaigns with CANDELS data to provide NIR coverage for the entire UDF field of view. We use aperture-matched point-spread function corrected photometry to measure photometric redshifts in the UDF, sampling both the Lyman break and Balmer break of galaxies at z~0.8-3.4, and one of the breaks over the rest of the redshift range. Our comparison of these results with a compilation of robust spectroscopic redshifts shows an improvement in the galaxy photometric redshifts by a factor of two in scatter and a factor three in outlier fraction over previous UDF catalogs. The inclusion of the new NUV data is responsible for a factor of two decrease in the outlier fraction compared to redshifts determined from only the optical and NIR data, and improves the scatter at z<0.5 and at z>2. The panchromatic coverage of the UDF from the NUV through the NIR yields robust photometric redshifts of the UDF, with the lowest outlier fraction available.
  • We present the Swift X-ray Cluster Survey (SWXCS) catalog obtained using archival data from the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite acquired from 2005 to 2012, extending the first release of the SWXCS. The catalog provides positions, soft fluxes, and, when possible, optical counterparts for a flux-limited sample of X-ray group and cluster candidates. We consider the fields with Galactic latitude |b| > 20 degree to avoid high HI column densities. We discard all of the observations targeted at groups or clusters of galaxies, as well as particular extragalactic fields not suitable to search for faint extended sources. We finally select ~3000 useful fields covering a total solid angle of ~400 degree^2. We identify extended source candidates in the soft-band (0.5-2keV) images of these fields using the software EXSdetect, which is specifically calibrated for the XRT data. Extensive simulations are used to evaluate contamination and completeness as a function of the source signal, allowing us to minimize the number of spurious detections and to robustly assess the selection function. Our catalog includes 263 candidate galaxy clusters and groups down to a flux limit of 7E-15 erg/cm^2/s in the soft band, and the logN-logS is in very good agreement with previous deep X-ray surveys. The final list of sources is cross-correlated with published optical, X-ray, and SZ catalogs of clusters. We find that 137 sources have been previously identified as clusters, while 126 are new detections. Currently, we have collected redshift information for 158 sources (60% of the entire sample). Once the optical follow-up and the X-ray spectral analysis of the sources are complete, the SWXCS will provide a large and well-defined catalog of groups and clusters of galaxies to perform statistical studies of cluster properties and tests of cosmological models.
  • Although giant clumps of stars are crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we study the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5<z<3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the HII regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of SFGs that contain at least one off-center clump (Fclumpy) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate of SFGs in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q>0.5. The redshift evolution of Fclumpy changes with the stellar mass (M*) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log(M*/Msun)<9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant Fclumpy of about 60% from z~3.0 to z~0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their Fclumpy from 55% at z~3.0 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z~0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the Fclumpy trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the Fclumpy trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z<1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the Fclumpy trend in all masses at z<1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of SFGs shows a broad peak around galaxies with log(M*/Msun)~10.5 at all redshifts, possibly linked to the molecular gas fraction of the galaxies. (Abridged)
  • Distant star-forming galaxies show a correlation between their star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses, and this has deep implications for galaxy formation. Here, we present a study on the evolution of the slope and scatter of the SFR-stellar mass relation for galaxies at $3.5\leq z\leq 6.5$ using multi-wavelength photometry in GOODS-S from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. We describe an updated, Bayesian spectral-energy distribution fitting method that incorporates effects of nebular line emission, star formation histories that are constant or rising with time, and different dust attenuation prescriptions (starburst and Small Magellanic Cloud). From $z$=6.5 to $z$=3.5 star-forming galaxies in CANDELS follow a nearly unevolving correlation between stellar mass and SFR that follows SFR $\sim$ $M_\star^a$ with $a = 0.54 \pm 0.16$ at $z\sim 6$ and $0.70 \pm 0.21$ at $z\sim 4$. This evolution requires a star formation history that increases with decreasing redshift (on average, the SFRs of individual galaxies rise with time). The observed scatter in the SFR-stellar mass relation is tight, $\sigma(\log \mathrm{SFR}/\mathrm{M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1})< 0.3\ - $ 0.4 dex, for galaxies with $\log M_\star/\mathrm{M}_\odot > 9$ dex. Assuming that the SFR is tied to the net gas inflow rate (SFR $\sim$ $\dot{M}_\mathrm{gas}$), then the scatter in the gas inflow rate is also smaller than 0.3$-$0.4 dex for star-forming galaxies in these stellar mass and redshift ranges, at least when averaged over the timescale of star formation. We further show that the implied star formation history of objects selected on the basis of their co-moving number densities is consistent with the evolution in the SFR-stellar mass relation.
  • We present an analysis of the deepest Herschel images in four major extragalactic fields GOODS-North, GOODS-South, UDS and COSMOS obtained within the GOODS-Herschel and CANDELS-Herschel key programs. The picture provided by 10497 individual far-infrared detections is supplemented by the stacking analysis of a mass-complete sample of 62361 star-forming galaxies from the CANDELS-HST H band-selected catalogs and from two deep ground-based Ks band-selected catalogs in the GOODS-North and the COSMOS-wide fields, in order to obtain one of the most accurate and unbiased understanding to date of the stellar mass growth over the cosmic history. We show, for the first time, that stacking also provides a powerful tool to determine the dispersion of a physical correlation and describe our method called "scatter stacking" that may be easily generalized to other experiments. We demonstrate that galaxies of all masses from z=4 to 0 follow a universal scaling law, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies. We find a universal close-to-linear slope of the logSFR-logM* relation with evidence for a flattening of the main sequence at high masses (log(M*/Msun) > 10.5) that becomes less prominent with increasing redshift and almost vanishes by z~2. This flattening may be due to the parallel stellar growth of quiescent bulges in star-forming galaxies. Within the main sequence, we measure a non varying SFR dispersion of 0.3 dex. The specific SFR (sSFR=SFR/M*) of star-forming galaxies is found to continuously increase from z=0 to 4. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings on the cosmic SFR history and show that more than 2/3 of present-day stars must have formed in a regime dominated by the main sequence mode. As a consequence we conclude that, although omnipresent in the distant Universe, galaxy mergers had little impact in shaping the global star formation history over the last 12.5 Gyr.
  • Quenched galaxies at z>2 are nearly all very compact relative to z~0, suggesting a physical connection between high stellar density and efficient, rapid cessation of star-formation. We present restframe UV spectra of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z~3 selected to be candidate progenitors of quenched galaxies at z~2 based on their compact restframe optical sizes and high surface density of star-formation. We compare their UV properties to those of more extended LBGs of similar mass and star formation rate (non-candidates). We find that candidate progenitors have faster ISM gas velocities and higher equivalent widths of interstellar absorption lines, implying larger velocity spread among absorbing clouds. Candidates deviate from the relationship between equivalent widths of Lyman-alpha and interstellar absorption lines in that their Lyman-alpha emission remains strong despite high interstellar absorption, possibly indicating that the neutral HI fraction is patchy such that Lyman-alpha photons can escape. We detect stronger CIV P-Cygni features (emission and absorption) and HeII emission in candidates, indicative of larger populations of metal rich Wolf-Rayet stars compared to non-candidates. The faster bulk motions, broader spread of gas velocity, and Lyman-alpha properties of candidates are consistent with their ISM being subject to more energetic feedback than non-candidates. Together with their larger metallicity (implying more evolved star-formation activity) this leads us to propose, if speculatively, that they are likely to quench sooner than non-candidates, supporting the validity of selection criteria used to identify them as progenitors of z~2 passive galaxies. We propose that massive, compact galaxies undergo more rapid growth of stellar mass content, perhaps because the gas accretion mechanisms are different, and quench sooner than normally-sized LBGs at these early epochs.
  • The observed deficit of strongly Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at z>6.5 is attributed to either increasing neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and/or to the evolving galaxy properties. To investigate this, we have performed very deep near-IR spectroscopy of z>7 galaxies using MOSFIRE on the Keck-I Telescope. We measure the Lyman-alpha fraction at z~8 (combined photometric redshift peak at z=7.7) using two methods. First, we derived NLy{\alpha}/Ntot directly using extensive simulations to correct for incompleteness. Second, we used a Bayesian formalism (introduced by Treu et al. 2012) that compares the z>7 galaxy spectra to models of the Lyman-alpha equivalent width (WLy{\alpha}) distribution at z~6. We explored two simple evolutionary scenarios: smooth evolution where Lyman-alpha is attenuated in all galaxies by a constant factor (perhaps owing to processes from galaxy evolution or a slowly increasing IGM opacity), and patchy evolution where Lyman-alpha is blocked in some fraction of galaxies (perhaps due to the IGM being opaque along only some fraction of sightlines). The Bayesian formalism places stronger constraints compared with the direct method. Combining our data with that in the literature we find that at z~8 the Lyman-alpha fraction has dropped by a factor >3(84% confidence interval) using both the smooth and patchy scenarios compared to the z~6 values. Furthermore, we find a tentative evidence that the data favor the patchy scenario over smooth (with "positive" Bayesian evidence), extending trends observed at z~7 to higher redshift. If this decrease is a result of reionization as predicted by theory, then our data imply the volume averaged neutral hydrogen fraction in the IGM to be >0.3 suggesting that the reionization of the universe is in progress at z~8.
  • We use data taken as part of HST/WFC3 observations of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) to identify massive and evolved galaxies at 3<z<4.5. This is performed using the strength of the Balmer break feature at rest-frame 3648A, which is a diagnostic of the age of the stellar population in galaxies. Using WFC3 H-band selected catalog for the CANDELS GOODS-S field and deep multi-waveband photometry from optical (HST) to mid-infrared (Spitzer) wavelengths, we identify a population of old and evolved post-starburst galaxies based on the strength of their Balmer breaks (Balmer Break Galaxies- BBGs). The galaxies are also selected to be bright in rest-frame near-IR wavelengths and hence, massive. We identify a total of 16 BBGs. Fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the BBGs show that the candidate galaxies have average estimated ages of ~800 Myr and average stellar masses of ~5x10^10 M_sun, consistent with being old and massive systems. Two of our BBG candidates are also identified by the criteria that is sensitive to star forming galaxies (LBG selection). We find a number density of ~3.2x10^-5 Mpc^-3 for the BBGs corresponding to a mass density of ~2.0x10^6 M_sun/Mpc^3 in the redshift range covering the survey. Given the old age and the passive evolution, it is argued that some of these objects formed the bulk of their mass only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.
  • We measure new estimates for the galaxy stellar mass function and star formation rates for samples of galaxies at $z \sim 4,~5,~6~\&~7$ using data in the CANDELS GOODS South field. The deep near-infrared observations allow us to construct the stellar mass function at $z \geq 6$ directly for the first time. We estimate stellar masses for our sample by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with synthetic stellar populations, including nebular line and continuum emission. The observed UV luminosity functions for the samples are consistent with previous observations, however we find that the observed $M_{UV}$ - M$_{*}$ relation has a shallow slope more consistent with a constant mass to light ratio and a normalisation which evolves with redshift. Our stellar mass functions have steep low-mass slopes ($\alpha \approx -1.9$), steeper than previously observed at these redshifts and closer to that of the UV luminosity function. Integrating our new mass functions, we find the observed stellar mass density evolves from $\log_{10} \rho_{*} = 6.64^{+0.58}_{-0.89}$ at $z \sim 7$ to $7.36\pm0.06$ $\text{M}_{\odot} \text{Mpc}^{-3}$ at $z \sim 4$. Finally, combining the measured UV continuum slopes ($\beta$) with their rest-frame UV luminosities, we calculate dust corrected star-formation rates (SFR) for our sample. We find the specific star-formation rate for a fixed stellar mass increases with redshift whilst the global SFR density falls rapidly over this period. Our new SFR density estimates are higher than previously observed at this redshift.
  • We report on a study of the 2300-2600\AA FeII/FeII* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0<z<2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z~1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spetroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the VLT and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the FeII absorption lines down to a limit of W_r>1.5 \AA and of the FeII* emission lines to W_r>0.5 \AA. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [OII] emission line, we find that both the FeII and MgII absorption lines are blueshifted, indicative that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the FeII gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of MgII. We investigate the variation of FeII line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that FeII lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the FeII lines relative to the MgII doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended FeII* emission in 2D stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for the FeII absorption lie close (3~4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the FeII/FeII* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.
  • We investigate the star formation histories (SFHs) of high redshift (3 <~ z <~ 5) star-forming galaxies selected based on their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) colors in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field. By comparing the results from the spectral-energy-distribution-fitting analysis with two different assumptions about the SFHs --- i.e., exponentially declining SFHs as well as increasing ones, we conclude that the SFHs of high-redshift star-forming galaxies increase with time rather than exponentially decline. We also examine the correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) and the stellar masses. When the galaxies are fit with rising SFRs, we find that the trend seen in the data qualitatively matches the expectations from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The mean specific SFR is shown to increase with redshift, also in agreement with the theoretical prediction. From the derived tight correlation between stellar masses and SFRs, we derive the mean SFH of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range of 3 <~ z <~ 5, which shows a steep power-law (with power alpha = 5.85) increase with time. We also investigate the formation timescales and the mean stellar population ages of these star-forming galaxies. Our analysis reveals that UV-selected star-forming galaxies have a broad range of the formation redshift. The derived stellar masses and the stellar population ages show positive correlation in a sense that more massive galaxies are on average older, but with significant scatter. This large scatter implies that the galaxies' mass is not the only factor which affects the growth or star formation of high-redshift galaxies.