• We present high-precision timing data over time spans of up to 11 years for 45 millisecond pulsars observed as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project, aimed at detecting and characterizing low-frequency gravitational waves. The pulsars were observed with the Arecibo Observatory and/or the Green Bank Telescope at frequencies ranging from 327 MHz to 2.3 GHz. Most pulsars were observed with approximately monthly cadence, with six high--timing-precision pulsars observed weekly, and all were observed at widely separated frequencies at each observing epoch in order to fit for time-variable dispersion delays. We describe our methods for data processing, time-of-arrival (TOA) calculation, and the implementation of a new, automated method for removing outlier TOAs. We fit a timing model for each pulsar that includes spin, astrometric, and, if necessary, binary parameters, in addition to time-variable dispersion delays and parameters that quantify pulse-profile evolution with frequency. The new timing solutions provide three new parallax measurements, two new Shapiro delay measurements, and two new measurements of large orbital-period variations. We fit models that characterize sources of noise for each pulsar. We find that 11 pulsars show significant red noise, with generally smaller spectral indices than typically measured for non-recycled pulsars, possibly suggesting a different origin. Future papers will use these data to constrain or detect the signatures of gravitational-wave signals.
  • We present the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope discovery of the highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1835$-$3259A in the Fermi Large Area Telescope-detected globular cluster NGC 6652. Timing over one orbit yields the pulse period 3.89 ms, orbital period 9.25 d, eccentricity $\sim 0.95$, and an unusually high companion mass of $0.74\,M_{\odot}$ assuming a $1.4\,M_{\odot}$ pulsar. We caution that the lack of data near periastron prevents a precise measurement of the eccentricity, and that further timing is necessary to constrain this and the other orbital parameters. From tidal considerations, we find that the companion must be a compact object. This system likely formed through an exchange encounter in the dense cluster environment. Our initial timing results predict the measurements of at least two post-Keplerian parameters with long-term phase-connected timing: the rate of periastron advance $\dot{\omega} \sim 0.1^{\circ}\,$yr$^{-1}$, requiring 1 yr of phase connection; and the Einstein delay $\gamma_{\mathrm{GR}} \sim 10\,$ms, requiring 2-3 yr of timing. For an orbital inclination $i > 50^{\circ}$, a measurement of $\sin{i}$ is also likely. PSR J1835$-$3259A thus provides an opportunity to measure the neutron star mass with high precision; to probe the cluster environment; and, depending on the nature of the companion, to investigate the limits of general relativity.
  • Swift J1626.6-5156 is a Be/X-ray binary that was in outburst from December 2005 until November 2008. We have examined RXTE/PCA and HEXTE spectra of three long observations of this source taken early in its outburst, when the PCA 2-20 keV count rate was >70 counts/s/PCU, as well as several combined observations from different stages of the outburst. The spectra are best fit with an absorbed cutoff power law with a ~6.4 keV iron emission line and a Gaussian optical depth absorption line at ~10 keV. We present strong evidence that this absorption-like feature is a cyclotron resonance scattering feature, making Swift J1626.6-5156 a new candidate cyclotron line source. The redshifted energy of ~10 keV implies a magnetic field strength of ~8.6(1+z) x 10^11 G in the region of the accretion column close to the magnetic poles where the cyclotron line is produced. Analysis of phase averaged spectra spanning the duration of the outburst suggests a possible positive correlation between the fundamental cyclotron energy and source luminosity. Phase resolved spectroscopy from a long observation reveals a variable cyclotron line energy, with phase dependence similar to a variety of other pulsars, as well as the first harmonic of the fundamental cyclotron line.
  • Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profiles. We find that, compared to the profiles derived from symmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines, increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission, formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, with vacuum dipole fits being more favorable.
  • We have searched for millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in two globular clusters detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. These clusters contained no known MSPs prior to their detections in gamma rays. The discovery of gamma ray emission from many MSPs and the prevalence of MSPs in globular clusters points to a population of MSPs as the likely source of the detected GeV emission, directing our search for new cluster MSPs. We observed NGC 6652 and NGC 6388 at 2 GHz with the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument pulsar backend at the Green Bank Telescope using the coherent dedispersion mode. We have discovered one MSP in the gamma ray error circle of NGC 6652. This pulsar is interesting because, while positionally coincident with the GC, it has a much lower dispersion measure than expected from the NE2001 galactic free electron density model. It is unclear whether the MSP is a foreground pulsar or a cluster member, and whether the pulsar, cluster, or both, is responsible for the gamma ray emission. Timing the MSP will give the pulsar position and a solid identification of the pulsar as a cluster member if it is within a few core radii of the cluster center, as well as the opportunity to search for gamma ray pulsations and determine the origin of the GeV emission.
  • The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems. The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA 1 pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models, within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle, maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius, under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry.
  • We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.