• We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1--2 km s$^{-1}$ precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s$^{-1}$. We calculate a velocity dispersion of $\le9.1$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s$^{-1}$ radial velocity offset from its neighbor Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive-star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10--15 km s$^{-1}$, possibly triggering further massive-star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.
  • We present proper motion measurements of 37 jets and HH objects in the Carina Nebula measured in two epochs of H$\alpha$ images obtained $\sim 10$ yrs apart with HST/ACS. Transverse velocities in all but one jet are faster than $\gtrsim 25$ km s$^{-1}$, confirming that the jet-like H$\alpha$ features identified by Smith et al. (2010) trace outflowing gas. Proper motions constrain the location of the jet-driving source and provide kinematic confirmation of the intermediate-mass protostars that we identify for 20/37 jets. Jet velocities do not correlate with the estimated protostar mass and embedded driving sources do not have slower jets. Instead, transverse velocities (median $\sim 75$ km s$^{-1}$) are similar to those in jets from low-mass stars. Assuming a constant velocity since launch, we compute jet dynamical ages (median $\sim 10^4$ yr). If continuous emission from inner jets traces the duration of the most recent accretion bursts, then these episodes are sustained longer (median $\sim 700$ yr) than the typical decay time of an FU Orionis outburst. These jets can carry appreciable momentum that may be injected into the surrounding environment. The resulting outflow force, $dP/dt$, lies between that measured in low- and high-mass sources, despite the very different observational tracers used. Smooth scaling of the outflow force argues for a common physical process underlying outflows from protostars of all masses. This latest kinematic result adds to a growing body of evidence that intermediate-mass star formation proceeds like a scaled-up version of the formation of low-mass stars.
  • We constrain the proper motions of five OB stars associated with candidate stellar wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula using HST ACS imaging over 9--10 year baselines. These proper motions allow us to directly compare each star's motion to the orientation of its candidate bow shock. Although these stars are saturated in our imaging, we assess their motion by the shifts required to minimize residuals in their Airy rings. The results limit the direction of each star's motion to sectors less than 90 degrees wide. None of the five stars are moving away from the Carina Nebula's central clusters as runaway stars would be, confirming that a candidate bow shock is not necessarily indicative of a runaway star. Two of the five stars are moving tangentially relative to the orientation of their candidate bow shocks, both of which point at the OB cluster Trumpler 14. In these cases, the large-scale flow of the interstellar medium, powered by feedback from the cluster, appears to dominate over the motion of the star in producing the observed candidate bow shock. The remaining three stars all have some component of motion toward the central clusters, meaning that we cannot distinguish whether their candidate bow shocks are indicators of stellar motion, of the flow of ambient gas, or of density gradients in their surroundings. In addition, these stars' lack of outward motion hints that the distributed massive-star population in Carina's South Pillars region formed in place, rather than migrating out from the association's central clusters.
  • We report the discovery in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the new Herbig-Haro jet, HH 1019, located near the Tr 14 cluster in the Carina Nebula. Like other HH jets in the region, this bipolar collimated flow emerges from the head of a dark dust pillar. However, HH 1019 is unique because -- unlike all other HH jets known to date -- it is identified by a linear chain of dark, dusty knots that are seen primarily in silhouette against the background screen of the H II region. Proper motions confirm that these dark condensations move along the jet axis at high speed. [S II] emission traces a highly collimated jet that is spatially coincident with these dust knots. The high extinction in the body of the jet suggests that this outflow has lifted a large amount of dust directly from the disk, although it is possible that it has entrained dust from its surrounding protostellar envelope before exiting the dust pillar. If dust in HH 1019 originates from the circumstellar disk, this provides further evidence for a jet launched from a range of radii in the disk, including those outside the dust sublimation radius. HH 1019 may be the prototype for a new subclass of dusty HH objects seen primarily in extinction against the background screen of a bright H II region. Such jets may be common, but difficult to observe because they require the special condition of a very bright background in order to be seen in silhouette.
  • We analyze eight epochs of Hubble Space Telescope H$\alpha$+[N II] imaging of Eta Carinae's outer ejecta. Proper motions of nearly 800 knots reveal that the detected ejecta are divided into three apparent age groups, dating to around 1250 A.D., to around 1550 A.D., and to during or shortly before the Great Eruption of the 1840s. Ejecta from these groups reside in different locations and provide a firm constraint that Eta Car experienced multiple major eruptions prior to the 19th century. The 1250 and 1550 events did not share the same axisymmetry as the Homunculus; the 1250 event was particularly asymmetric, even one-sided. In addition, the ejecta in the S ridge, which have been associated with the Great Eruption, appear to predate the ejection of the Homunculus by several decades. We detect essentially ballistic expansion across multiple epochs. We find no evidence for large-scale deceleration of the observed knots that could power the soft X-ray shell by plowing into surrounding material, suggesting that the observed X-rays arise instead from fast, rarefied ejecta from the 1840s overtaking the older dense knots. Early deceleration and subsequent coasting cannot explain the origin of the older outer ejecta---significant episodic mass loss prior to the 19th century is required. The timescale and geometry of the past eruptions provide important constraints for any theoretical physical mechanisms driving Eta Car's behavior. Non-repeating mechanisms such as the merger of a close binary in a triple system would require additional complexities to explain the observations.
  • We present the first results from our survey of the star-forming complex W3, combining VRI photometry with multiobject spectroscopy to identify and characterize the high-mass stellar population across the region. With 79 new spectral classifications, we bring the total number of spectroscopically-confirmed O- and B-type stars in W3 to 105. We find that the high-mass slope of the mass function in W3 is consistent with a Salpeter IMF, and that the extinction toward the region is best characterized by an Rv of approximately 3.6. B-type stars are found to be more widely dispersed across the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC) than previously realized: they are not confined to the high-density layer (HDL) created by the expansion of the neighboring W4 HII region into the GMC. This broader B-type population suggests that star formation in W3 began spontaneously up to 8--10 Myr ago, although at a lower level than the more recent star formation episodes in the HDL. In addition, we describe a method of optimizing sky subtraction for fiber spectra in regions of strong and spatially-variable nebular emission.
  • HH 666 is an externally irradiated protostellar outflow in the Carina Nebula for which we present new near-IR [Fe II] spectra obtained with the FIRE spectrograph at Magellan Observatory. Earlier H{\alpha} and near-IR [Fe II] imaging revealed that the two emission lines trace substantially different morphologies in the inner ~40" of the outflow. H{\alpha} traces a broad cocoon that surrounds the collimated [Fe II] jet that extends throughout the parent dust pillar. New spectra show that this discrepancy extends to their kinematics. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces steady, fast velocities of +/- 200 km/s from the eastern and western limbs of the jet. We compare this to a previously published H{\alpha} spectrum that reveals a Hubble-flow velocity structure near the jet-driving source. New, second-epoch HST/ACS H{\alpha} images reveal the lateral spreading of the H{\alpha} outflow lobe away from the jet axis. H{\alpha} proper motions also indicate a sudden increase in the mass-loss rate ~1000 yr ago, while steady [Fe II] emission throughout the inner jet suggests that the burst is ongoing. An accretion burst sustained for ~1000 yr is an order of magnitude longer than expected for FU Orionis outbursts, but represents only a small fraction of the total age of the HH 666 outflow. Altogether, available data suggests that [Fe II] traces the highly collimated protostellar jet while H{\alpha} traces the entrained and irradiated outflow. HH 666 appears to be a missing link between bare jets seen in H II regions and entrained molecular outflows seen from embedded protostars in more quiescent regions.
  • HH 900 is a peculiar protostellar outflow emerging from a small, tadpole-shaped globule in the Carina nebula. Previous H{\alpha} imaging with HST/ACS showed an ionized outflow with a wide opening angle that is distinct from the highly collimated structures typically seen in protostellar jets. We present new narrowband near-IR [Fe II] images taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope that reveal a remarkably different structure than H{\alpha}. In contrast to the unusual broad H{\alpha} outflow, the [Fe II] emission traces a symmetric, collimated bipolar jet with the morphology and kinematics that are more typical of protostellar jets. In addition, new Gemini adaptive optics images reveal near-IR H$_2$ emission coincident with the H{\alpha} emission, but not the [Fe II]. Spectra of these three components trace three separate and distinct velocity components: (1) H$_2$ from the slow, entrained molecular gas, (2) H{\alpha} from the ionized skin of the accelerating outflow sheath, and (3) [Fe II] from the fast, dense, and collimated protostellar jet itself. Together, these data require a driving source inside the dark globule that remains undetected behind a large column density of material. In contrast, H{\alpha} and H$_2$ emission trace the broad outflow of material entrained by the jet, which is irradiated outside the globule. As it get dissociated and ionized, it remains visible for only a short time after it is dragged into the H II region.