• We report new observations with the Very Large Array, Atacama Large Millimeter Array, and Submillimeter Array at frequencies from 1.0 to 355 GHz of the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A*. These observations were conducted between October 2012 and November 2014. While we see variability over the whole spectrum with an amplitude as large as a factor of 2 at millimeter wavelengths, we find no evidence for a change in the mean flux density or spectrum of Sgr A* that can be attributed to interaction with the G2 source. The absence of a bow shock at low frequencies is consistent with a cross-sectional area for G2 that is less than $2 \times 10^{29}$ cm$^2$. This result fits with several model predictions including a magnetically arrested cloud, a pressure-confined stellar wind, and a stellar photosphere of a binary merger. There is no evidence for enhanced accretion onto the black hole driving greater jet and/or accretion flow emission. Finally, we measure the millimeter wavelength spectral index of Sgr A* to be flat; combined with previous measurements, this suggests that there is no spectral break between 230 and 690 GHz. The emission region is thus likely in a transition between optically thick and thin at these frequencies and requires a mix of lepton distributions with varying temperatures consistent with stratification.
  • We present results from daily radio continuum observations of the Bootes field as part of the Pi GHz Sky Survey (PiGSS). These results are part of a systematic and unbiased campaign to characterize variable and transient sources in the radio sky. The observations include 78 individual epochs distributed over 5 months at a radio frequency of 3.1 GHz with a median RMS image noise in each epoch of 2.8 mJy. We produce 5 monthly images with a median RMS of 0.6 mJy. No transient radio sources are detected in the daily or monthly images. At 15 mJy, we set an upper limit (2 sigma) to the surface density of 1-day radio transients at 0.025 deg^-2. At 5 mJy, we set an upper limit (2\sigma) to the surface density of 1-month radio transients at 0.18 deg^-2. We also produce light curves for 425 sources and explore the variability properties of these sources. Approximately 20% of the sources exhibit some variability on daily and monthly time scales. The maximum RMS fractional modulations on the 1 day and 1 month time scales for sources brighter than 10 mJy are 2 and 0.5, respectively. The probability of a daily fluctuation for all sources and all epochs by a factor of 10 is less than 10^-4. We compare the radio to mid-infrared variability for sources in the field and find no correlation. Finally, we apply the statistics of transient and variable populations to constrain models for a variety of source classes.
  • We report the detection of variable linear polarization from Sgr A* at a wavelength of 3.5mm, the longest wavelength yet at which a detection has been made. The mean polarization is 2.1 +/- 0.1% at a position angle of 16 +/- 2 deg with rms scatters of 0.4% and 9 deg over the five epochs. We also detect polarization variability on a timescale of days. Combined with previous detections over the range 150-400GHz (750-2000 microns), the average polarization position angles are all found to be consistent with a rotation measure of -4.4 +/- 0.3 x 10^5 rad/m^2. This implies that the Faraday rotation occurs external to the polarized source at all wavelengths. This implies an accretion rate ~0.2 - 4 x 10^-8 Msun/yr for the accretion density profiles expected of ADAF, jet and CDAF models and assuming that the region at which electrons in the accretion flow become relativistic is within 10 R_S. The inferred accretion rate is inconsistent with ADAF/Bondi accretion. The stability of the mean polarization position angle between disparate polarization observations over the frequency range limits fluctuations in the accretion rate to less than 5%. The flat frequency dependence of the inter-day polarization position angle variations also makes them difficult to attribute to rotation measure fluctuations, and suggests that both the magnitude and position angle variations are intrinsic to the emission.
  • We report the discovery of variability in the linear polarization from the Galactic Center black hole source, Sagittarius A*. New polarimetry obtained with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association array at a wavelength of 1.3 mm shows a position angle that differs by 28 +/- 5 degrees from observations 6 months prior and then remains stable for 15 months. This difference may be due to a change in the source emission region on a scale of 10 Schwarzschild radii or due to a change of 3 x 10^5 rad m^-2 in the rotation measure. We consider a change in the source physics unlikely, however, since we see no corresponding change in the total intensity or polarized intensity fraction. On the other hand, turbulence in the accretion region at a radius ~ 10 to 1000 R_s could readily account for the magnitude and time scale of the position angle change.
  • We present a search for linear polarization at 22 GHz, 43 GHz and 86 GHz from the nearest super massive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A*. We find upper limits to the linear polarization of 0.2%, 0.4% and 1%, respectively. These results strongly support the conclusion of our centimeter wavelength spectro-polarimetry that Sgr A* is not depolarized by the interstellar medium but is in fact intrinsically depolarized.