• In the development of topological photonics, achieving three dimensional topological insulators is of significant interest since it enables the exploration of new topological physics with photons, and promises novel photonic devices that are robust against disorders in three dimensions. Previous theoretical proposals towards three dimensional topological insulators utilize complex geometries that are challenging to implement. Here, based on the concept of synthetic dimension, we show that a two-dimensional array of ring resonators, which was previously demonstrated to exhibit a two-dimensional topological insulator phase, in fact automatically becomes a three-dimensional topological insulator, when the frequency dimension is taken into account. Moreover, by modulating a few of the resonators, a screw dislocation along the frequency axis can be created, which provides robust transport of photons along the frequency axis. Demonstrating the physics of screw dislocation in a topological system has been a significant challenge in solid state systems. Our work indicates that the physics of three-dimensional topological insulator can be explored in standard integrated photonics platforms, leading to opportunities for novel devices that control the frequency of light.
  • We provide a systematic study of non-Hermitian topologically charged systems. Starting from a Hermitian Hamiltonian supporting Weyl points with arbitrary topological charge, adding a non-Hermitian perturbation transforms the Weyl points to one-dimensional exceptional contours. We analytical prove that the topological charge is preserved on the exceptional contours. In contrast to Hermitian systems, the addition of gain and loss allows for a new class of topological phase transition: when two oppositely charged exceptional contours touch, the topological charge can dissipate without opening a gap. These effects can be demonstrated in realistic photonics and acoustics systems.
  • The recent observation of high-harmonic generation from solids creates a new possibility for engineering fundamental strong-field processes by patterning the solid target with subwavelength nanostructures. All-dielectric metasurfaces exhibit high damage thresholds and strong enhancement of the driving field, making them attractive platforms to control high-harmonics and other high-field processes at nanoscales. Here we report enhanced non-perturbative high-harmonic emission from a Si metasurface that possesses a sharp Fano resonance resulting from a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency. Harmonic emission is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned samples. The enhanced high harmonics are highly anisotropic with excitation polarization and are selective to excitation wavelength due to its resonant feature. By combining nanofabrication technology and ultrafast strong-field physics, our work paves the way for designing new compact ultrafast photonic devices that operate under high intensities and short wavelengths.
  • We show that a single ring resonator undergoing dynamic modulation can be used to create a synthetic space with an arbitrary dimension. In such a system the phases of the modulation can be used to create a photonic gauge potential in high dimensions. As an illustration of the implication of this concept, we show that the Haldane model, which exhibits non-trivial topology in two dimensions, can be implemented in the synthetic space using three rings. Our results point to a route towards exploring higher-dimensional topological physics in low-dimensional physical structures. The dynamics of photons in such synthetic spaces also provides a mechanism to control the spectrum of light.
  • We study a one-dimensional photonic resonator lattice with Kerr nonlinearity under the dynamic modulation. With an appropriate choice of the modulation frequency and phase, we find that this system can be used to create anyons from photons. By coupling the resonators with external waveguides, the anyon characteristics can be explored by measuring the transport property of the photons in the external waveguides.
  • We report the existence of topologically charged nodal surface, a band degeneracy on a two-dimensional surface in momentum space that is topologically charged. We develop a Hamiltonian for such charged nodal surface, and show that such a Hamiltonian can be implemented in a tight-binding model as well as in an acoustic meta-material. We also identify a topological phase transition, through which the charges of the nodal surface changes by absorbing or emitting an integer number of Weyl points. Our result indicates that in the band theory, topologically charged objects are not restrict to zero dimension as in a Weyl point, and thus pointing to previously unexplored opportunities for the design of topological materials.
  • Weyl fermions have not been found in nature as elementary particles, but they emerge as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest in these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here we report the experimental observation of generalized optical Weyl points inside the parameter space of a photonic crystal with a specially designed four-layer unit cell. The reflection at the surface of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits phase vortexes due to the synthetic Weyl points, which in turn guarantees the existence of interface states between photonic crystals and any reflecting substrates. The reflection phase vortexes have been confirmed for the first time in our experiments which serve as an experimental signature of the generalized Weyl points. The existence of these interface states is protected by the topological properties of the Weyl points and the trajectories of these states in the parameter space resembles those of Weyl semimetal "Fermi arcs surface states" in momentum space. Tracing the origin of interface states to the topological character of the parameter space paves the way for a rational design of strongly localized states with enhanced local field.
  • We propose a route towards creating a metamaterial that behaves as a photonic Chern insulator, through homogenization of an array of gyromagnetic cylinders. We show that such an array can exhibit non-trivial topological effects, including topologically non-trivial band gaps and one-way edge states, when it can be homogenized to an effective medium model that has the Berry curvature strongly peaked at the wavevector k=0. The non-trivial band topology depends only on the parameters of the cylinders and the cylinders' density, and can be realized in a wide variety of different lattices including periodic, quasi-periodic and random lattices. Our system provides a platform to explore the interplay between disorder and topology and also opens a route towards synthesis of topological meta-materials based on the self-assembly approach.
  • The geometric phase and topological property for one-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals consisting of a simple lattice of graphene sheets are investigated systematically. For transverse magnetic waves, both plasmonic and photonic modes exist in the momentum space. The accidental degeneracy point of these two kinds of modes is identified to be a diabolic point accompanied with a topological phase transition. For a closed loop around this degeneracy point, the Berry phase is Pi as a consequence of the discontinuous jump of the geometric Zak phase. The wave impedance is calculated analytically for the semi-infinite system, and the corresponding topological interface states either start from or terminate at the degeneracy point. This type of localized interface states may find potential applications in photonics and plasmonics.
  • Weyl fermions1 do not appear in nature as elementary particles, but they are now found to exist as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest of these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here, we demonstrate that generalized Weyl points can exist in a parameter space and we report the first observation of such nodal points in one-dimensional photonic crystals in the optical range. The reflection phase inside the band gap of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits vortexes in the parameter space where the Weyl points are defined and they share the same topological charges as the Weyl points. These vortexes guarantee the existence of interface states, the trajectory of which can be understood as "Fermi arcs" emerging from the Weyl nodes.
  • In this paper, we investigate the band properties of 2D honeycomb plasmonic lattices consisting of metallic nanoparticles. By means of the coupled dipole method and quasi-static approximation, we theoretically analyze the band structures stemming from near-field interaction of localized surface plasmon polaritons for both the infinite lattice and ribbons. Naturally, the interaction of point dipoles decouples into independent out-of-plane and in-plane polarizations. For the out-of-plane modes, both the bulk spectrum and the range of the momentum $k_{\parallel}$ where edge states exist in ribbons are similar to the electronic bands in graphene. Nevertheless, the in-plane polarized modes show significant differences, which do not only possess additional non-flat edge states in ribbons, but also have different distributions of the flat edge states in reciprocal space. For in-plane polarized modes, we derived the bulk-edge correspondence, namely, the relation between the number of flat edge states at a fixed $k_\parallel$, Zak phases of the bulk bands and the winding number associated with the bulk hamiltonian, and verified it through four typical ribbon boundaries, i.e. zigzag, bearded zigzag, armchair, and bearded armchair. Our approach gives a new topological understanding of edge states in such plasmonic systems, and may also apply to other 2D "vector wave" systems.
  • Interface states in photonic crystals usually require defects or surface/interface decorations. We show here that one can control interface states in 1D photonic crystals through the engineering of geometrical phase such that interface states can be guaranteed in even or odd, or in all photonic bandgaps. We verify experimentally the designed interface states in 1D multilayered photonic crystals fabricated by electron beam vapor deposition. We also obtain the geometrical phases by measuring the reflection phases at the bandgaps of the PCs and achieve good agreement with the theory. Our approach could provide a platform for the design of using interface states in photonic crystals for nonlinear optic, sensing, and lasing applications
  • In this paper we investigate anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson with heavy fermions, employing shapes of kinematic distributions. We study the processes $pp \to t\bar{t} + H$, $b\bar{b} + H$, $tq+H$, and $pp \to H\to\tau^+\tau^-$, and present applications of event generation, re-weighting techniques for fast simulation of anomalous couplings, as well as matrix element techniques for optimal sensitivity. We extend the MELA technique, which proved to be a powerful matrix element tool for Higgs boson discovery and characterization during Run I of the LHC, and implement all analysis tools in the JHU generator framework. A next-to-leading order QCD description of the $pp \to t\bar{t} + H$ process allows us to investigate the performance of MELA in the presence of extra radiation. Finally, projections for LHC measurements through the end of Run III are presented.
  • We show that Weyl points with topological charges 1 and 2 can be found in very simple chiral woodpile photonic crystals, which can be fabricated using current techniques down to the nano-scale. The sign of the topological charges can be tuned by changing the material parameters of the crystal, keeping the structure and the symmetry unchanged. The underlying physics can be understood using a tight binding model, which shows that the sign of the charge depends on the hopping range. Gapless surface states and their back-scattering immune properties are also demonstrated in these systems.
  • We report the existence of Weyl points in a class of non-central symmetric metamaterials, which has time reversal symmetry, but does not have inversion symmetry due to chiral coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This class of metamaterial exhibits either type-I or type-II Weyl points depending on its non-local response. We also provide a physical realization of such metamaterial consisting of an array of metal wires in the shape of elliptical helixes which exhibits type-II Weyl points.
  • Zak phase labels the topological property of one-dimensional Bloch Bands. Here we propose a scheme and experimentally measure the Zak phase in a photonic system. The Zak phase of a bulk band of is related to the topological properties of the two band gaps sandwiching this band, which in turn can be inferred from the existence or absence of an interface state. Using reflection spectrum measurement, we determined the existence of interface states in the gaps, and then obtained the Zak phases. The knowledge of Zak phases can also help us predict the existence of interface states between a metasurface and a photonic crystal. By manipulating the property of the metasurface, we can further tune the excitation frequency and the polarization of the interface state.
  • We designed and fabricated a time-reversal invariant Weyl photonic crystal that possesses single Weyl nodes with topological charge of 1 and double Weyl nodes with a higher topological charge of 2. Using numerical simulations and microwave experiment, nontrivial band gaps with nonzero Chern numbers for a fixed kz was demonstrated. The robustness of the surface state between the Weyl photonic crystal and PEC against kz-conserving scattering was experimentally observed.
  • We build an effective medium theory for two-dimensional photonic crystals comprising a rectangular lattice of dielectric cylinders with the incident electric field polarized along the axis of the cylinders. In particular, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an effective medium theory for the case where the Bloch wave vector is far away from the center of Brillouin zone, where the optical response of the photonic crystal is necessarily anisotropic and hence the effective medium description becomes inevitability angle dependent. We employ the scattering theory and treat the two-dimensional system as a stack of one-dimensional arrays. We consider only the zero-order interlayer diffraction and all the higher order diffraction terms of interlayer scattering are ignored. This approximation works well when the higher order diffraction terms are all evanescent waves and the interlayer distance is far enough for them to decay out. Scattering theory enables the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a finite sized slab, and we extract the effective parameters such as the impedance ($Z_e$) and the refractive index ($n_e$) using a parameter retrieval method. We note that $n_e$ is uniquely defined only in a very limited region of the reciprocal space. ($n_e k_0 a<<1$, where $k_0$ is the wave vector inside the vacuum and a is thickness of the slab for retrieval), but $Z_e$ is uniquely defined and has a well-defined meaning inside a much larger domain in the reciprocal space. For a lossless system, the effective impedance $Z_e$ is purely real for the pass band and purely imaginary in the band gaps. Using the sign of the imaginary part of $Z_e$, we can classify the band gaps into two groups and this classification explains why there is usually no surface state on the boundary of typical fully gapped photonic crystals comprising of a lattice of dielectric cylinders.
  • It is well known that incident photons carrying momentum hk exert a positive photon pressure. But if light is impinging from a negative refractive medium in which hk is directed towards the source of radiation, should light insert a photon "tension" instead of a photon pressure? Using an ab initio method that takes the underlying microstructure of a material into account, we find that when an electromagnetic wave propagates from one material into another, the electromagnetic stress at the boundary is in fact indeterminate if only the macroscopic parameters are specified. Light can either pull or push the boundary, depending not only on the macroscopic parameters but also on the microscopic lattice structure of the polarizable units that constitute the medium. Within the context of effective medium approach, the lattice effect is attributed to electrostriction and magnetostriction which can be accounted for by the Helmholtz stress tensor if we employ the macroscopic fields to calculate the boundary optical stress.
  • Non-Hermitian systems distinguish themselves from Hermitian systems by exhibiting a phase transition point called an exceptional point (EP), which is the point at which two eigenstates coalesce under a system parameter variation. Many interesting EP phenomena such as level crossings/repulsions in nuclear/molecular and condensed matter physics, and unusual phenomena in optics such as loss-induced lasing and unidirectional transmission can be understood by considering a simple 2x2 non-Hermitian matrix. At a higher dimension, more complex EP physics not found in two-state systems arises. We consider the emergence and interaction of multiple EPs in a four-state system theoretically and realize the system experimentally using four coupled acoustic cavities with asymmetric losses. We find that multiple EPs can emerge and as the system parameters vary, these EPs can collide and merge, leading to higher order singularities and topological characteristics much richer than those seen in two-state systems.
  • We study the topological edge plasmon modes between two "diatomic" chains of identical plasmonic nanoparticles. Zak phase for longitudinal plasmon modes in each chain is calculated analytically by solutions of macroscopic Maxwell's equations for particles in quasi-static dipole approximation. This approximation provides a direct analogy with the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model such that the eigenvalue is mapped to the frequency dependent inverse-polarizability of the nanoparticles. The edge state frequency is found to be the same as the single-particle resonance frequency, which is insensitive to the separation distances within a unit cell. Finally, full electrodynamic simulations with realistic parameters suggest that the edge plasmon mode can be realized through near-field optical spectroscopy.
  • Inspired by the discovery of quantum hall effect and topological insulator, topological properties of classical waves start to draw worldwide attention. Topological non-trivial bands characterized by non-zero Chern numbers are realized with external magnetic field induced time reversal symmetry breaking or dynamic modulation. Due to the absence of Faraday-like effect, the breaking of time reversal symmetry in an acoustic system is commonly realized with moving background fluids, and hence drastically increases the engineering complexity. Here we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and effective gauge field in a reduced two-dimensional system by structurally engineering interlayer couplings, achieving an acoustic analog of the topological Haldane model. We then find and demonstrate unidirectional backscattering immune edge states. We show that the synthetic gauge field is closely related to the Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure.
  • If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much brighter is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as cloaking by anomalous resonance which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder.
  • There is no assurance that interface states can be found at the boundary separating two materials. As a strong perturbation typically favors wave localization, it is natural to expect that an interface state should form more easily in the boundary that represents a strong perturbation. Here, we show on the contrary that in some two dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) with a square lattice possessing Dirac-like cone at k=0, a small perturbation guarantees the existence of interface states. More specifically, we find that single-mode localized states exist in a deterministic manner at an interface formed by two PCs each with system parameters slightly perturbed from the conical dispersion condition. The conical dispersion guarantees the existence of gaps in the projected band structure which allows interface states to form and the assured existence of interface states stems from the geometric phases of the bulk bands.
  • Surface impedance is an important concept in classical wave systems such as photonic crystals (PCs). For example, the condition of an interface state formation in the interfacial region of two different one-dimensional PCs is simply Z_SL +Z_SR=0, where Z_SL (Z_SR)is the surface impedance of the semi-infinite PC on the left- (right-) hand side of the interface. Here, we also show a rigorous relation between the surface impedance of a one-dimensional PC and its bulk properties through the geometrical (Zak) phases of the bulk bands, which can be used to determine the existence or non-existence of interface states at the interface of the two PCs in a particular band gap. Our results hold for any PCs with inversion symmetry, independent of the frequency of the gap and the symmetry point where the gap lies in the Brillouin Zone. Our results provide new insights on the relationship between surface scattering properties, the bulk band properties and the formation of interface states, which in turn can enable the design of systems with interface states in a rational manner.