• Asteroids in mean motion resonances with giant planets are common in the solar system, but it was not until recently that several asteroids in retrograde mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn were discovered. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter, 2015 BZ509 is confirmed to be in a long-term stable retrograde 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter, which gives rise to our interests in its unique resonant dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the phase-space structure of the retrograde 1:1 resonance in detail within the framework of the circular restricted three-body problem. We construct a simple integrable approximation for the planar retrograde resonance using canonical contact transformation and numerically employ the averaging procedure in closed form. The phase portrait of the retrograde 1:1 resonance is depicted with the level curves of the averaged Hamiltonian. We thoroughly analyze all possible librations in the co-orbital region and uncover a new apocentric libration for the retrograde 1:1 resonance inside the planet's orbit. We also observe the significant jumps in orbital elements for outer and inner apocentric librations, which are caused by close encounters with the perturber.
  • This paper studies the binary disruption problem and asteroid capture mechanism in a sun-planet-binary four-body system. Firstly, the binary disruption condition is studied and the result shows that the binary is always disrupted at the perigee of their orbit instantaneously. Secondly, an analytic expression to describe the energy exchange between the binary is derived based on the instantaneous disruption hypothesis. The analytic result is validated through numerical integration. We obtain the energy exchange in encounters simultaneously by the analytic expression and numerical integration. The maximum deviation of this two results is always less than 25% and the mean deviation is about 8.69%. The analytic expression can give us an intuitive description of the energy exchange between the binary. It indicates that the energy change depends on the hyperbolic shape of the binary orbit with respect to the planet, the masses of planet and the primary member of the binary, the binary phase at perigee. We can illustrate the capture/escape processes and give the capture/escape region of the binary clearly by numerical simulation. We analyse the influence of some critical factors to the capture region finally.
  • We propose the formation of massive pristine dark-matter (DM) halos with masses of $\sim 10^8~M_\odot$, due to the dynamical effects of frequent mergers in rare regions of the Universe with high baryonic streaming velocity relative to DM. Since the streaming motion prevents gas collapse into DM halos and delays prior star formation episodes, the gas remains metal-free until the halo virial temperatures $\gtrsim 2\times 10^4~{\rm K}$. The minimum cooling mass of DM halos is boosted by a factor of $\sim 10-30$ because frequent major mergers of halos further inhibit gas collapse. We use Monte Carlo merger trees to simulate the DM assembly history under a streaming velocity of twice the root-mean-square value, and estimate the number density of massive DM halos containing pristine gas as $\simeq 10^{-4}~{\rm cMpc}^{-3}$. When the gas infall begins, efficient Ly$\alpha$ cooling drives cold streams penetrating inside the halo and feeding a central galactic disk. When one stream collides with the disk, strong shock forms a dense and hot gas cloud, where the gas never forms H$_2$ molecules due to effective collisional dissociation. As a result, a massive gas cloud forms by gravitational instability and collapses directly into a massive black hole (BH) with $M_\bullet \sim 10^5~M_\odot$. Almost simultaneously, a galaxy with $M_{\star, \rm tot}\sim 10^6~M_\odot$ composed of Population III stars forms in the nuclear region. If the typical stellar mass is as high as $\sim 100~M_\odot$, the galaxy could be detected with the James Webb Space Telescope even at $z\gtrsim 15$. These massive seed BHs would be fed by continuous gas accretion from the host galaxy, and grow to be bright quasars observed at $z\gtrsim 6$.
  • The features of collaboration patterns are often considered to be different from discipline to discipline. Meanwhile, collaborating among disciplines is an obvious feature emerged in modern scientific research, which incubates several interdisciplines. The features of collaborations in and among the disciplines of biological, physical and social sciences are analyzed based on 52,803 papers published in a multidisciplinary journal PNAS during 1999 to 2013. From those data, we found similar transitivity and assortativity of collaboration patterns as well as the identical distribution type of collaborators per author and that of papers per author, namely a mixture of generalized Poisson and power-law distributions. In addition, we found that interdisciplinary research is undertaken by a considerable fraction of authors, not just those with many collaborators or those with many papers. This case study provides a window for understanding aspects of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary collaboration patterns.
  • We present optical continuum lags for two Seyfert 1 galaxies, MCG+08-11-011 and NGC 2617, using monitoring data from a reverberation mapping campaign carried out in 2014. Our light curves span the ugriz filters over four months, with median cadences of 1.0 and 0.6 days for MCG+08-11-011 and NGC\,2617, respectively, combined with roughly daily X-ray and near-UV data from Swift for NGC 2617. We find lags consistent with geometrically thin accretion-disk models that predict a lag-wavelength relation of $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the observed lags are larger than predictions based on standard thin-disk theory by factors of 3.3 for MCG+08-11-011 and 2.3 for NGC\,2617. These differences can be explained if the mass accretion rates are larger than inferred from the optical luminosity by a factor of 4.3 in MCG+08-11-011 and a factor of 1.3 in NGC\,2617, although uncertainty in the SMBH masses determines the significance of this result. While the X-ray variability in NGC\,2617 precedes the UV/optical variability, the long 2.6 day lag is problematic for coronal reprocessing models.
  • This paper proposes a new perspective on the conventional planar target tracking problem. One evader and one pursuer are considered in the dynamics. In the planar tracking, pursuer has the ability to measure the position and the velocity information of the evader but with sensing delays. The modeling and the controller design of the system are presented with details. Then, a computer game is developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink, which constitutes the main contribution of the paper.
  • Collaborations and citations within scientific research grow simultaneously and interact dynamically. Modelling the coevolution between them helps to study many phenomena that can be approached only through combining citation and coauthorship data. A geometric graph for the coevolution is proposed, the mechanism of which synthetically expresses the interactive impacts of authors and papers in a geometrical way. The model is validated against a data set of papers published on PNAS during 2007-2015. The validation shows the ability to reproduce a range of features observed with citation and coauthorship data combined and separately. Particularly, in the empirical distribution of citations per author there exist two limits, in which the distribution appears as a generalized Poisson and a power-law respectively. Our model successfully reproduces the shape of the distribution, and provides an explanation for how the shape emerges via the decisions of authors. The model also captures the empirically positive correlations between the numbers of authors' papers, citations and collaborators.
  • We review the paradigm of holographic dark energy (HDE), which arises from a theoretical attempt of applying the holographic principle (HP) to the dark energy (DE) problem. Making use of the HP and the dimensional analysis, we derive the general formula of the energy density of HDE. Then, we describe the properties of HDE model, in which the future event horizon is chosen as the characteristic length scale. We also introduce the theoretical explorations and the observational constraints for this model. Next, in the framework of HDE, we discuss various topics, such as spatial curvature, neutrino, instability of perturbation, time-varying gravitational constant, inflation, black hole and big rip singularity. In addition, from both the theoretical and the observational aspects, we introduce the interacting holographic dark energy scenario, where the interaction between dark matter and HDE is taken into account. Furthermore, we discuss the HDE scenario in various modified gravity (MG) theories, such as Brans-Dicke theory, braneworld theory, scalar-tensor theory, Horava-Lifshitz theory, and so on. Besides, we introduce the attempts of reconstructing various scalar-field DE and MG models from HDE. Moreover, we introduce other DE models inspired by the HP, in which different characteristic length scales are chosen. Finally, we make comparisons among various HP-inspired DE models, by using cosmological observations and diagnostic tools.
  • Galactic outflows are ubiquitously observed in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming SN rate scales with gas surface density $\Sigma_{\rm{gas}}$ as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we find the mass loading factor, $\eta_m$, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing $\Sigma_{\rm{gas}}$ as $\eta_m \propto \Sigma^{-0.61}_{\rm{gas}}$. Approximately $\Sigma_{\rm{gas}}$ $\lesssim$ 50 $M_\odot/\rm{pc}^2$ marks when $\eta_m \gtrsim$1. About 10-50\% of the energy and 40-80\% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase ($T>3\times 10^5$ K), which fills 60-80\% of the volume at mid-plane, carries the majority of the energy and metals in outflows. We discuss how various physical processes, including vertical distribution of SNe, photoelectric heating, external gravitational field and SN rate, affect the loading efficiencies. The relative scale height of gas and SNe is a very important factor in determining the loading efficiencies.
  • In this work, we explore the cosmological consequences of the "Joint Light-curve Analysis" (JLA) supernova (SN) data by using an improved flux-averaging (FA) technique, in which only the type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at high redshift are flux-averaged. Adopting the criterion of figure of Merit (FoM) and considering six dark energy (DE) parameterizations, we search the best FA recipe that gives the tightest DE constraints in the $(z_{cut}, \Delta z)$ plane, where $z_{cut}$ and $\Delta z$ are redshift cut-off and redshift interval of FA, respectively. Then, based on the best FA recipe obtained, we discuss the impacts of varying $z_{cut}$ and varying $\Delta z$, revisit the evolution of SN color luminosity parameter $\beta$, and study the effects of adopting different FA recipe on parameter estimation. We find that: (1) The best FA recipe is $(z_{cut} = 0.6, \Delta z=0.06)$, which is insensitive to a specific DE parameterization. (2) Flux-averaging JLA samples at $z_{cut} \geq 0.4$ will yield tighter DE constraints than the case without using FA. (3) Using FA can significantly reduce the redshift-evolution of $\beta$. (4) The best FA recipe favors a larger fractional matter density $\Omega_{m}$. In summary, we present an alternative method of dealing with JLA data, which can reduce the systematic uncertainties of SNe Ia and give the tighter DE constraints at the same time. Our method will be useful in the use of SNe Ia data for precision cosmology.
  • L. Pei, M. M. Fausnaugh, A. J. Barth, B. M. Peterson, M. C. Bentz, G. De Rosa, K. D. Denney, M. R. Goad, C. S. Kochanek, K. T. Korista, G. A. Kriss, R. W. Pogge, V. N. Bennert, M. Brotherton, K. I. Clubb, E. Dalla Bontà, A. V. Filippenko, J. E. Greene, C. J. Grier, M. Vestergaard, W. Zheng, Scott M. Adams, Thomas G. Beatty, A. Bigley, Jacob E. Brown, Jonathan S. Brown, G. Canalizo, J. M. Comerford, Carl T. Coker, E. M. Corsini, S. Croft, K. V. Croxall, A. J. Deason, Michael Eracleous, O. D. Fox, E. L. Gates, C. B. Henderson, E. Holmbeck, T. W.-S. Holoien, J. J. Jensen, C. A. Johnson, P. L. Kelly, S. Kim, A. King, M. W. Lau, Miao Li, Cassandra Lochhaas, Zhiyuan Ma, E. R. Manne-Nicholas, J. C. Mauerhan, M. A. Malkan, R. McGurk, L. Morelli, Ana Mosquera, Dale Mudd, F. Muller Sanchez, M. L. Nguyen, P. Ochner, B. Ou-Yang, A. Pancoast, Matthew T. Penny, A. Pizzella, Radosław Poleski, Jessie Runnoe, B. Scott, Jaderson S. Schimoia, B. J. Shappee, I. Shivvers, Gregory V. Simonian, A. Siviero, Garrett Somers, Daniel J. Stevens, M. A. Strauss, Jamie Tayar, N. Tejos, T. Treu, J. Van Saders, L. Vican, S. Villanueva Jr., H. Yuk, N. L. Zakamska, W. Zhu, M. D. Anderson, P. Arévalo, C. Bazhaw, S. Bisogni, G. A. Borman, M. C. Bottorff, W. N. Brandt, A. A. Breeveld, E. M. Cackett, M. T. Carini, D. M. Crenshaw, A. De Lorenzo-Cáceres, M. Dietrich, R. Edelson, N. V. Efimova, J. Ely, P. A. Evans, G. J. Ferland, K. Flatland, N. Gehrels, S. Geier, J. M. Gelbord, D. Grupe, A. Gupta, P. B. Hall, S. Hicks, D. Horenstein, Keith Horne, T. Hutchison, M. Im, M. D. Joner, J. Jones, J. Kaastra, S. Kaspi, B. C. Kelly, J. A. Kennea, M. Kim, S. C. Kim, S. A. Klimanov, J. C. Lee, D. C. Leonard, P. Lira, F. MacInnis, S. Mathur, I. M. McHardy, C. Montouri, R. Musso, S. V. Nazarov, H. Netzer, R. P. Norris, J. A. Nousek, D. N. Okhmat, I. Papadakis, J. R. Parks, J.-U. Pott, S. E. Rafter, H.-W. Rix, D. A. Saylor, K. Schnülle, S. G. Sergeev, M. Siegel, A. Skielboe, M. Spencer, D. Starkey, H.-I. Sung, K. G. Teems, C. S. Turner, P. Uttley, C. Villforth, Y. Weiss, J.-H. Woo, H. Yan, S. Young, Y. Zu
    Feb. 3, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned six months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 $\AA$ optical continuum by $4.17^{+0.36}_{-0.36}$ days and $0.79^{+0.35}_{-0.34}$ days, respectively. The H$\beta$ lag relative to the 1158 $\AA$ ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is roughly $\sim$50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is $\sim$50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for H$\beta$ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C IV, Ly $\alpha$, He II(+O III]), and Si IV(+O IV]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured H$\beta$ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the $R_\mathrm{BLR} - L_\mathrm{AGN}$ relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.
  • In a previous paper, we proposed a heterotic dark energy model, called $\Lambda$HDE, in which dark energy is composed of two components: cosmological constant (CC) and holographic dark energy (HDE). The aim of this work is to give a more comprehensive and systematic investigation on the cosmological implications of the $\Lambda$HDE model. Firstly, we make use of the current observations to constrain the $\Lambda$HDE model, and compare its cosmology-fit results with the results of the $\Lambda$CDM and the HDE model. Then, by combining a qualitative theoretical analysis with a quantitative numerical study, we discuss the impact of considering curvature on the cosmic evolutions of fractional HDE density $\Omega_{hde}$ and fractional CC density $\Omega_{\Lambda}$, as well as on the ultimate cosmic fate. Finally, we explore the effects of adopting different types of observational data. We find that: (1) the current observational data cannot distinguish the $\Lambda$HDE model from the $\Lambda$CDM and the HDE model; this indicates that DE may contain multiple components. (2) the asymptotic solution of $\Omega_{hde}$ and the corresponding cosmic fate in a flat universe can be extended to the case of a non-flat universe; moreover, compared with the case of a flat universe, considering curvature will make HDE closer to a phantom dark energy. (3) compared with JLA dataset, SNLS3 data more favor a phantom type HDE; in contrast, using other types of observational data have no significant impact on the cosmic evolutions of the $\Lambda$HDE model.
  • The OVI $\lambda\lambda$1032, 1038\AA\ doublet emission traces collisionally ionized gas with $T\approx 10^{5.5}$ K, where the cooling curve peaks for metal-enriched plasma. This warm-hot phase is usually not well-resolved in numerical simulations of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), but can be responsible for a significant fraction of the emitted energy. Comparing simulated OVI emission to observations is therefore a valuable test of whether simulations predict reasonable cooling rates from this phase. We calculate OVI $\lambda$1032\AA\ emission, assuming collisional ionization equilibrium, for our small-box simulations of the stratified ISM regulated by supernovae. We find that the agreement is very good for our solar neighborhood model, both in terms of emission flux and mean OVI density seen in absorption. We explore runs with higher surface densities and find that, in our simulations, the OVI emission from the disk scales roughly linearly with the star formation rate. Observations of OVI emission are rare for external galaxies, but our results do not show obvious inconsistency with the existing data. Assuming the solar metallicity, OVI emission from the galaxy disk in our simulations accounts for roughly 0.5\% of supernovae heating.
  • In this work, we explore the cosmological implications of different baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, including the BAO data extracted by using the spherically averaged one-dimensional galaxy clustering (GC) statistics (hereafter BAO1) and the BAO data obtained by using the anisotropic two-dimensional GC statistics (hereafter BAO2). To make a comparison, we also take into account the case without BAO data (hereafter NO BAO). Firstly, making use of these BAO data, as well as the SNLS3 type Ia supernovae sample and the Planck distance priors data, we give the cosmological constraints of the $\Lambda$CDM, the $w$CDM, and the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) model. Then, we discuss the impacts of different BAO data on cosmological consquences, including its effects on parameter space, equation of state (EoS), figure of merit (FoM), deceleration-acceleration transition redshift, Hubble parameter $H(z)$, deceleration parameter $q(z)$, statefinder hierarchy $S^{(1)}_3(z)$, $S^{(1)}_4(z)$ and cosmic age $t(z)$. We find that: (1) NO BAO data always give a smallest fractional matter density $\Omega_{m0}$, a largest fractional curvature density $\Omega_{k0}$ and a largest Hubble constant $h$; in contrast, BAO1 data always give a largest $\Omega_{m0}$, a smallest $\Omega_{k0}$ and a smallest $h$. (2) For the $w$CDM and the CPL model, NO BAO data always give a largest EoS $w$; in contrast, BAO2 data always give a smallest $w$. (3) Compared with the case of BAO1, BAO2 data always give a slightly larger FoM, and thus can give a cosmological constraint with a slightly better accuracy. (4) The impacts of different BAO data on the cosmic evolution and the comic age are very small, and can not be distinguished by using various dark energy diagnosis and the cosmic age data.
  • We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014, targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGN) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a "changing look" AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H$\beta$ lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H$\gamma$ and He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100--300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.
  • Dark energy is investigated from the perspective of quantum cosmology. It is found that, together with an appropriate normal ordering factor $q$, only when there is dark energy then can the cosmological wave function be normalized. This interesting observation may require further attention.
  • We explore the cosmological consequences of interacting dark energy (IDE) models using the SNLS3 supernova samples. In particular, we focus on the impacts of different SNLS3 light-curve fitters (LCF) (corresponding to "SALT2", "SiFTO", and "Combined" sample). Firstly, making use of the three SNLS3 data sets, as well as the Planck distance priors data and the galaxy clustering data, we constrain the parameter spaces of three IDE models. Then, we study the cosmic evolutions of Hubble parameter $H(z)$, deceleration diagram $q(z)$, statefinder hierarchy $S^{(1)}_3(z)$ and $S^{(1)}_4(z)$, and check whether or not these dark energy diagnosis can distinguish the differences among the results of different SNLS3 LCF. At last, we perform high redshift cosmic age test using three old high redshift objects (OHRO), and explore the fate of the Universe. We find that, the impacts of different SNLS3 LCF are rather small, and can not be distinguished by using $H(z)$, $q(z)$, $S^{(1)}_3(z)$, $S^{(1)}_4(z)$, and the age data of OHRO. In addition, we infer, from the current observations, how far we are from a cosmic doomsday in the worst case, and find that the "Combined" sample always gives the largest 2$\sigma$ lower limit of the time interval between "big rip" and today, while the results given by the "SALT2" and the "SiFTO" sample are close to each other. These conclusions are insensitive to a specific form of dark sector interaction. Our method can be used to distinguish the differences among various cosmological observations.
  • In this work, by applying the redshift tomography method to Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) supernova sample, we explore the possible redshift-dependence of stretch-luminosity parameter $\alpha$ and color-luminosity parameter $\beta$. The basic idea is to divide the JLA sample into different redshift bins, assuming that $\alpha$ and $\beta$ are piecewise constants. Then, by constraining the $\Lambda$CDM model, we check the consistency of cosmology-fit results given by the SN sample of each redshift bin. We also adopt the same technique to explore the possible evolution of $\beta$ in various subsamples of JLA. Using the full JLA data, we find that $\alpha$ is always consistent with a constant. In contrast, at high redshift $\beta$ has a significant trend of decreasing, at $\sim 3.5\sigma$ confidence level (CL). Moreover, we find that low-$z$ subsample favors a constant $\beta$; in contrast, SDSS and SNLS subsamples favor a decreasing $\beta$ at 2$\sigma$ and $3.3\sigma$ CL, respectively. Besides, by using a binned parameterization of $\beta$, we study the impacts of $\beta$'s evolution on parameter estimation. We find that compared with a constant $\beta$, a varying $\beta$ yields a larger best-fit value of fractional matter density $\Omega_{m0}$, which slightly deviates from the best-fit result given by other cosmological observations. However, for both the varying $\beta$ and the constant $\beta$ cases, the $1\sigma$ regions of $\Omega_{m0}$ are still consistent with the result given by other observations.
  • Shafieloo ea al. firstly proposed the possibility that the current cosmic acceleration (CA) is slowing down. However, this is rather counterintuitive because a slowing down CA cannot be accommodated in most mainstream cosmological models. In this work, by exploring the evolutionary trajectories of dark energy equation of state $w(z)$ and deceleration parameter $q(z)$, we present a comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of CA from both the theoretical and the observational sides. For the theoretical side, we study the impact of different $w(z)$ by using six parametrization models, and then discuss the effects of spatial curvature. For the observational side, we investigate the effects of different type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and different cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, respectively. We find that (1) The evolution of CA are insensitive to the specific form of $w(z)$; in contrast, a non-flat Universe more favors a slowing down CA than a flat Universe. (2) SNLS3 SNe Ia datasets favor a slowing down CA at 1$\sigma$ confidence level, while JLA SNe Ia samples prefer an eternal CA; in contrast, the effects of different BAO data are negligible. (3) Compared with CMB distance prior data, full CMB data more favor a slowing down CA. (4) Due to the low significance, the slowing down of CA is still a theoretical possibility that cannot be confirmed by the current observations.
  • We study the dual CFT description of the $d+1$-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\"om-Anti de Sitter (RN-AdS$_{d+1}$) black hole in the large dimension (large $d$) limit, both for the extremal and nonextremal cases. The central charge of the dual CFT$_2$ (or chiral CFT$_1$) is calculated for the near horizon near extremal geometry which possess an AdS$_2$ structure. Besides, the $Q$-picture hidden conformal symmetry in the nonextremal background can be naturally obtained by a probe charged scalar field in the large $d$ limit, without the need to input the usual limits to probe the hidden conformal symmetry. Furthermore, an new dual CFT description of the nonextremal RN-AdS$_{d+1}$ black hole is found in the large $d$ limit and the duality is analyzed by comparing the entropies, the absorption cross sections and the retarded Green's functions obtained both from the gravity and the dual CFT sides.
  • Supernovae (SN), the most energetic stellar feedback mechanism, are crucial for regulating the interstellar medium (ISM) and launching galactic winds. We explore how supernova remnants (SNRs) create a multiphase medium by performing 3D hydrodynamical simulations at various SN rates, $S$, and ISM average densities, $\bar{n}$. The evolution of a SNR in a self-consistently generated three-phase ISM is qualitatively different from that in a uniform or a two-phase warm/cold medium. By travelling faster and further in the low-density hot phase, the domain of a SNR increases by $>10^{2.5}$. Varying $\bar{n}$ and $S$, we find that a steady state can only be achieved when the hot gas volume fraction $f_{\rm{V,hot}}\lesssim 0.6 \pm 0.1 $. Above that level, overlapping SNRs render connecting topology of the hot gas, and the ISM is subjected to thermal runaway. Photoelectric heating (PEH) has a surprisingly strong impact on $f_{\rm{V,hot}}$. For $\bar{n}\gtrsim 3 \cm-3 $, a reasonable PEH rate is able to suppress the thermal runaway. Overall, we determine the critical SN rate for the onset of thermal runaway to be $S_{\rm{crit}} = 200 (\bar{n}/1\cm-3)^k (E_{\rm{SN}}/10^{51}\erg)^{-1} \kpc^{-3} \myr-1$, where $k = (1.2,2.7)$ for $\bar{n} \leq 1$ and $> 1\cm-3 $, respectively. We present a fitting formula of the ISM pressure $P(\bar{n}$, $S$), which can be used as an effective equation of state in cosmological simulations. Despite the 5 orders of magnitude span of $(\bar{n},S)$, the average Mach number varies little: $\mathcal{M} \approx \ 0.5\pm 0.2, \ 1.2\pm 0.3,\ 2.3\pm 0.9$ for the hot, warm and cold phases, respectively.
  • Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the $\Lambda$HDE model. By studying the $\Lambda$HDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters $d$ and $\Omega_{hde}$ are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the $\Lambda$HDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields $\chi^2_{\rm min}=426.27$ when constrained by $\rm Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST$, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant $\Lambda$CDM model (431.35). At 68.3\% CL, we obtain $-0.07<\Omega_{\Lambda0}<0.68$ and correspondingly $0.04<\Omega_{hde0}<0.79$, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the $\Lambda$HDE model.
  • In this paper, we present a probabilistic framework for goal-driven spoken dialog systems. A new dynamic stochastic state (DS-state) is then defined to characterize the goal set of a dialog state at different stages of the dialog process. Furthermore, an entropy minimization dialog management(EMDM) strategy is also proposed to combine with the DS-states to facilitate a robust and efficient solution in reaching a user's goals. A Song-On-Demand task, with a total of 38117 songs and 12 attributes corresponding to each song, is used to test the performance of the proposed approach. In an ideal simulation, assuming no errors, the EMDM strategy is the most efficient goal-seeking method among all tested approaches, returning the correct song within 3.3 dialog turns on average. Furthermore, in a practical scenario, with top five candidates to handle the unavoidable automatic speech recognition (ASR) and natural language understanding (NLU) errors, the results show that only 61.7\% of the dialog goals can be successfully obtained in 6.23 dialog turns on average when random questions are asked by the system, whereas if the proposed DS-states are updated with the top 5 candidates from the SLU output using the proposed EMDM strategy executed at every DS-state, then a 86.7\% dialog success rate can be accomplished effectively within 5.17 dialog turns on average. We also demonstrate that entropy-based DM strategies are more efficient than non-entropy based DM. Moreover, using the goal set distributions in EMDM, the results are better than those without them, such as in sate-of-the-art database summary DM.
  • The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. The recent observations of BAO in SDSS DR9 and DR11 take measurements of $H(z)$ at several different redshifts. It is argued that the behavior of dark energy could be constrained more effectively by adding high-redshift Hubble parameter data, such as the SDSS DR11 measurement of $H(z) = 222\pm7$ km/sec/Mpc at z = 2.34. In this paper, we investigate the significance of these BAO data in the flat $\Lambda$CDM model, by combining them with the recent observational data of the Hubble constant from local distance ladder and the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements from Planck+WP. We perform a detailed data analysis on these datasets and find that the recent observations of BAO in SDSS DR9 and DR11 have considerable tension with the Planck + WP measurements in the framework of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. The fitting results show that the main contribution to the tension comes from the Hubble parameter measurement at redshift of $z=2.34$. But there is no visible tension once the joint data analysis by combining the datasets of SDSS and Planck+WP is performed. Thus in order to see whether dark energy does evolve, we need more independent measurements of the Hubble parameter at high redshifts.
  • Using the 1.3m and 2.4m telescopes of the MDM Observatory, we identified the close companions of two eclipsing millisecond radio pulsars discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in searches of Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope sources, and measured their light curves. PSR J1301+0833 is a black widow pulsar in a 6.5 hr orbit whose companion star is strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. It varies from R = 21.8 to R > 24 around the orbit. PSR J1628-3205 is a "redback," a nearly Roche-lobe filling system in a 5.0 hr orbit whose optical modulation in the range 19.0 < R < 19.4 is dominated by strong ellipsoidal variations, indicating a large orbital inclination angle. PSR J1628-3205 also shows evidence for a long-term variation of about 0.2 mag, and an asymmetric temperature distribution possibly due to either off-center heating by the pulsar wind, or large starspots. Modelling of its light curve restricts the inclination angle to i > 55 degrees, the mass of the companion to 0.16 < M_c < 0.30 M_sun, and the effective temperature to 3560 < T_eff < 4670 K. As is the case for several redbacks, the companion of PSR J1628-3205 is less dense and hotter than a main-sequence star of the same mass.