• In this work we present a newly constructed equation of state (EoS) --applicable to stellar core collapse and neutron star mergers--, including the entire baryon octet. Our EoS is compatible with the main constraints from nuclear physics and, in particular, with a maximum mass for cold beta-equilibrated neutron stars of 2 solar masses in agreement with recent observations. As an application of our new EoS, we compute numerical stationary models for rapidly (rigidly) rotating hot neutron stars. We consider maximum masses of hot stars, such as proto-neutron stars or hypermassive neutron stars in the post-merger phase of binary neutron star coalescence. The universality of I-Q-relations at nonzero temperature for fast rotating models, comparing a purely nuclear EoS with its counterparts containing Lambda-hyperons or the entire baryon octet, respectively, is discussed, too. We find that the I-Q universality is broken when thermal effects become important, whatever the value of entropy gradients in our models. Thus, the use of I-Q relations for the analysis of proto-neutron stars or merger remnant data, including gravitational wave signals from the last stages of binary neutron star mergers, should be regarded with care.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • We give an overview about equations of state (EOS) which are currently available for simulations of core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers. A few selected important aspects of the EOS, such as the symmetry energy, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and cluster formation, are confronted with constraints from experiments and astrophysical observations. There are just very few models which are compatible even with this very restricted set of constraints. These remaining models illustrate the uncertainty of the uniform nuclear matter EOS at high densities. In addition, at finite temperatures the medium modifications of nuclear clusters represent a conceptual challenge. In conclusion, there has been significant development in the recent years, but there is still need for further improved general purpose EOS tables.
  • In this paper, we study in detail the role of general relativity on the global dynamics of giant pulsar glitches as exemplified by Vela. For this purpose, we carry out numerical simulations of the spin up triggered by the sudden unpinning of superfluid vortices. In particular, we compute the exchange of angular momentum between the core neutron superfluid and the rest of the star within a two-fluid model including both (non-dissipative) entrainment effects and (dissipative) mutual friction forces. Our simulations are based on a quasi-stationary approach using realistic equations of state (EoSs). We show that the evolution of the angular velocities of both fluids can be accurately described by an exponential law. The associated characteristic rise time $\tau_{\text{r}}$, which can be precisely computed from stationary configurations only, has a form similar to that obtained in the Newtonian limit. However, general relativity changes the structure of the star and leads to additional couplings between the fluids due to frame-dragging effects. As a consequence, general relativity can have a large impact on the actual value of $\tau_{\text{r}}$: the errors incurred by using Newtonian gravity are thus found to be as large as $\sim 40 \%$ for the models considered. Values of the rise time are calculated for Vela and compared with current observational limits. Finally, we study the amount of gravitational waves emitted during a glitch. Simple expressions are obtained for the corresponding characteristic amplitudes and frequencies. The detectability of glitches through gravitational wave observatories is briefly discussed.
  • We present a numerical model for uniformly rotating superfluid neutron stars, for the first time with realistic microphysics including entrainment, in a fully general relativistic framework. We compute stationary and axisymmetric configurations of neutron stars composed of two fluids, namely superfluid neutrons and charged particles (protons and electrons), rotating with different rates around a common axis. Both fluids are coupled by entrainment, a non-dissipative interaction which in case of a non-vanishing relative velocity between the fluids, causes the fluid momenta being not aligned with the respective fluid velocities. We extend the formalism by Comer and Joynt (2003) in order to calculate the equation of state (EoS) and entrainment parameters for an arbitrary relative velocity. The resulting entrainment matrix fulfills all necessary sum rules and in the limit of small relative velocity our results agree with Fermi liquid theory ones, derived to lowest order in the velocity. This formalism is applied to two new nuclear equations of state which are implemented in the numerical model. We are able to obtain precise equilibrium configurations. Resulting density profiles and moments of inertia are discussed employing both EoSs, showing the impact of entrainment and the dependence on the EoS.
  • The neutron-star inner crust is assumed to be superfluid at relevant temperatures. The contribution of neutron quasiparticles to thermodynamic and transport properties of the crust is therefore strongly suppressed by the pairing gap. Nevertheless, the neutron gas still has low-energy excitations, namely long-wavelength collective modes. We summarize different approaches to describe the collective modes in the crystalline phases of the inner crust and present an improved model for the description of the collective modes in the pasta phases within superfluid hydrodynamics.
  • The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. The potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory is analyzed. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.
  • With an average density higher than the nuclear density, neutron stars (NS) provide a unique test-ground for nuclear physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and nuclear superfluidity. Determination of the fundamental interactions that govern matter under such extreme conditions is one of the major unsolved problems of modern physics, and -- since it is impossible to replicate these conditions on Earth -- a major scientific motivation for SKA. The most stringent observational constraints come from measurements of NS bulk properties: each model for the microscopic behaviour of matter predicts a specific density-pressure relation (its `Equation of state', EOS). This generates a unique mass-radius relation which predicts a characteristic radius for a large range of masses and a maximum mass above which NS collapse to black holes. It also uniquely predicts other bulk quantities, like maximum spin frequency and moment of inertia. The SKA, in Phase 1 and particularly in Phase 2 will, thanks to the exquisite timing precision enabled by its raw sensitivity, and surveys that dramatically increase the number of sources: 1) Provide many more precise NS mass measurements (high mass NS measurements are particularly important for ruling out EOS models); 2) Allow the measurement of the NS moment of inertia in highly relativistic binaries such as the Double Pulsar; 3) Greatly increase the number of fast-spinning NS, with the potential discovery of spin frequencies above those allowed by some EOS models; 4) Improve our knowledge of new classes of binary pulsars such as black widows and redbacks (which may be massive as a class) through sensitive broad-band radio observations; and 5) Improve our understanding of dense matter superfluidity and the state of matter in the interior through the study of rotational glitches, provided that an ad-hoc campaign is developed.
  • We present a self-consistent model for the study of the structure of a neutron star in strong magnetic fields. Starting from a microscopic Lagrangian, this model includes the effect of the magnetic field on the equation of state, the interaction of the electromagnetic field with matter (magnetisation), and anisotropies in the energy-momentum tensor, as well as general relativistic aspects. We build numerical axisymmetric stationary models and show the applicability of the approach with one example quark matter equation of state (EoS) often employed in the recent literature for studies of strongly magnetised neutron stars. For this EoS, the effect of inclusion of magnetic field dependence or the magnetisation do not increase the maximum mass significantly in contrast to what has been claimed by previous studies.
  • We present numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse with spherically symmetric, general relativistic hydrodynamics up to black hole formation. Using the CoCoNuT code, with a newly developed grey leakage scheme for the neutrino treatment, we investigate the effects of including pions and \Lambda-hyperons into the equation of state at high densities and temperatures on the black hole formation process. Results show non-negligible differences between the models with reference equation of state without any additional particles and models with the extended ones. For the latter, the maximum masses supported by the proto-neutron star are smaller and the collapse to a black hole occurs earlier. A phase transition to hyperonic matter is observed when the progenitor allows for a high enough accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star. Rough estimates of neutrino luminosity from these collapses are given, too.
  • An accurate low-energy dispersive parametrization of the scalar Kpi form factor was constructed some time ago in terms of a single parameter guided by the Callan-Treiman low-energy theorem. A similar twice subtracted dispersive parametrization for the vector Kpi form factor will be investigated here. The robustness of the parametrization of these two form factors will be studied in great detail. In particular the cut-off dependence, the isospin breaking effects and the possible, though not highly probable, presence of zeros in the form factors will be discussed. Interesting constraints in the latter case will be obtained from the soft-kaon analog of the Callan-Treiman theorem and a comparison with the recent tau --> K pi nu_tau data.
  • Surface effects in strange-quark matter play an important role for certain observables which have been proposed in order to identify strange stars, and color superconductivity can strongly modify these effects. We study the surface of color superconducting strange-quark matter by solving the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations for finite systems ("strangelets") within the MIT bag model, supplemented with a pairing interaction. Due to the bag-model boundary condition, the strange-quark density is suppressed at the surface. This leads to a positive surface charge, concentrated in a layer of ~1 fm below the surface, even in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase. However, since in the CFL phase all quarks are paired, this positive charge is compensated by a negative charge, which turns out to be situated in a layer of a few tens of fm below the surface, and the total charge of CFL strangelets is zero. We also study the surface and curvature contributions to the total energy. Due to the strong pairing, the energy as a function of the mass number is very well reproduced by a liquid-drop type formula with curvature term.
  • The properties of the pseudoscalar Goldstone bosons in the color-flavor locked phase at moderate densities are studied within a model of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio type. The Goldstone bosons are constructed explicitly by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for quark-quark scattering in random phase approximation. Main focus of our investigations are (i) the weak decay constant in the chiral limit, (ii) the masses of the flavored (pseudo-) Goldstone bosons for non-zero but equal quark masses, (iii) their masses and effective chemical potentials for non-equal quark masses, and (iv) the onset of kaon condensation. We compare our results with the predictions of the low-energy effective field theory. The deviations from results obtained in the weak-coupling limit are discussed in detail.
  • We discuss in detail a five-dimensional Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model compactified on $S^1/Z_2$ extended by the effective Majorana neutrino mass operator. We study the evolution of neutrino masses and mixings. Masses and angles, in particular the atmospheric mixing angle $\theta_{23}$, can be significantly lowered at high energies with respect to their value at low energy.
  • We study pseudoscalar meson excitations in the color-flavor locked phase within a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model by calculating diquark loops.
  • Different scenarios of new physics beyond the standard model give rise to a direct coupling of right-handed quarks to W bosons. We will discuss how the prediction of the Callan-Treiman low energy theorem for the scalar K pi form factor in combination with recent data on $K^L_{\mu 3}$ decays can serve as a stringent test of the standard model (SM) and possible extensions, in particular right-handed charged quark currents (RHCs). In addition, we will comment on the impact of hadronic tau decay data on RHCs.
  • Clean tests of a small admixture of right-handed quark currents directly coupled to the standard W are still lacking. We show that such non-standard couplings can be significantly constrained measuring the value of the scalar Kpi form factor at the Callan-Treiman point to a few percent. A realistic prospect of such a measurement in K^L_{mu3} decay based on an accurate dispersive representation of the scalar form factor is presented. The inadequacy of the currently used linear parametrisation is explained and illustrated using recent KTeV data. We briefly comment on the charged Kaon mode.
  • We study an ultracold trapped Fermi gas of atoms in two hyperfine states with unequal populations. In this situation the usual BCS pairing is suppressed and non-standard pairing mechanisms become important. These are treated by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, which at the same time correctly take into account the finite size of the trapped system. We find results which can be viewed as generalization of the LOFF phase to finite systems.
  • Flavour changing neutral current decays are a very sensitive test of the standard model and its extensions. In particular the decay K -> pi nu nubar constitutes a clean way to provide constraints, independent of long distance effects. Motivated by the recent experimental data of the E787 and E865 collaborations and by the difference between the standard model prediction and data, we consider in detail new physics scenarios such as the minimal supersymmetric standard model and R-parity violating supersymmetry. We begin with analysing the impact of new measurements on the standard model result obtaining B(K^+ -> pi^+ nu nubar)=(8.18 +/- 1.22) x 10^(-11). Predictions for other rare kaon decays are discussed, too. Our results allow to improve the limits on R-parity violating couplings with respect to previous analyses.
  • We study the low energy limit of Little Higgs models. The method consists in eliminating the heavy fields using their classical equations of motion in the infinite mass limit. After the elimination of the heavy degrees of freedom we can directly read off deviations from the precision electroweak data. We also examine the effects on the low energy precision experiments.