• We show that any one-counter automaton with $n$ states, if its language is non-empty, accepts some word of length at most $O(n^2)$. This closes the gap between the previously known upper bound of $O(n^3)$ and lower bound of $\Omega(n^2)$. More generally, we prove a tight upper bound on the length of shortest paths between arbitrary configurations in one-counter transition systems (weaker bounds have previously appeared in the literature).
  • We prove that for every class $C$ of graphs with effectively bounded expansion, given a first-order sentence $\varphi$ and an $n$-element structure $\mathbb{A}$ whose Gaifman graph belongs to $C$, the question whether $\varphi$ holds in $\mathbb{A}$ can be decided by a family of AC-circuits of size $f(\varphi)\cdot n^c$ and depth $f(\varphi)+c\log n$, where $f$ is a computable function and $c$ is a universal constant. This places the model-checking problem for classes of bounded expansion in the parameterized circuit complexity class $para-AC^1$. On the route to our result we prove that the basic decomposition toolbox for classes of bounded expansion, including orderings with bounded weak coloring numbers and low treedepth decompositions, can be computed in $para-AC^1$.
  • We prove that for every positive integer $k$, there exists an $\text{MSO}_1$-transduction that given a graph of linear cliquewidth at most $k$ outputs, nondeterministically, some clique decomposition of the graph of width bounded by a function of $k$. A direct corollary of this result is the equivalence of the notions of $\text{CMSO}_1$-definability and recognizability on graphs of bounded linear cliquewidth.
  • In the classic Maximum Weight Independent Set problem we are given a graph $G$ with a nonnegative weight function on vertices, and the goal is to find an independent set in $G$ of maximum possible weight. While the problem is NP-hard in general, we give a polynomial-time algorithm working on any $P_6$-free graph, that is, a graph that has no path on $6$ vertices as an induced subgraph. This improves the polynomial-time algorithm on $P_5$-free graphs of Lokshtanov et al. (SODA 2014), and the quasipolynomial-time algorithm on $P_6$-free graphs of Lokshtanov et al (SODA 2016). The main technical contribution leading to our main result is enumeration of a polynomial-size family $\mathcal{F}$ of vertex subsets with the following property: for every maximal independent set $I$ in the graph, $\mathcal{F}$ contains all maximal cliques of some minimal chordal completion of $G$ that does not add any edge incident to a vertex of $I$.
  • We study the Directed Feedback Vertex Set problem parameterized by the treewidth of the input graph. We prove that unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis fails, the problem cannot be solved in time $2^{o(t\log t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$ on general directed graphs, where $t$ is the treewidth of the underlying undirected graph. This is matched by a dynamic programming algorithm with running time $2^{\mathcal{O}(t\log t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$. On the other hand, we show that if the input digraph is planar, then the running time can be improved to $2^{\mathcal{O}(t)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$.
  • We propose polynomial-time algorithms that sparsify planar and bounded-genus graphs while preserving optimal or near-optimal solutions to Steiner problems. Our main contribution is a polynomial-time algorithm that, given an unweighted graph $G$ embedded on a surface of genus $g$ and a designated face $f$ bounded by a simple cycle of length $k$, uncovers a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ of size polynomial in $g$ and $k$ that contains an optimal Steiner tree for any set of terminals that is a subset of the vertices of $f$. We apply this general theorem to prove that: * given an unweighted graph $G$ embedded on a surface of genus $g$ and a terminal set $S \subseteq V(G)$, one can in polynomial time find a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ that contains an optimal Steiner tree $T$ for $S$ and that has size polynomial in $g$ and $|E(T)|$; * an analogous result holds for an optimal Steiner forest for a set $S$ of terminal pairs; * given an unweighted planar graph $G$ and a terminal set $S \subseteq V(G)$, one can in polynomial time find a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ that contains an optimal (edge) multiway cut $C$ separating $S$ and that has size polynomial in $|C|$. In the language of parameterized complexity, these results imply the first polynomial kernels for Steiner Tree and Steiner Forest on planar and bounded-genus graphs (parameterized by the size of the tree and forest, respectively) and for (Edge) Multiway Cut on planar graphs (parameterized by the size of the cutset). Additionally, we obtain a weighted variant of our main contribution.
  • There are numerous examples of the so-called square root phenomenon in the field of parameterized algorithms: many of the most fundamental graph problems, parameterized by some natural parameter $k$, become significantly simpler when restricted to planar graphs and in particular the best possible running time is exponential in $O(\sqrt{k})$ instead of $O(k)$ (modulo standard complexity assumptions). We consider two classic optimization problems parameterized by the number of terminals. The Steiner Tree problem asks for a minimum-weight tree connecting a given set of terminals T in an edge-weighted graph. In the Subset Traveling Salesman problem we are asked to visit all the terminals $T$ by a minimum-weight closed walk. We investigate the parameterized complexity of these problems in planar graphs, where the number $k = |T|$ of terminals is regarded as the parameter. Our results are the following: (1) Subset TSP can be solved in time $2^{O(\sqrt{k} \log k)} \cdot n^{O(1)}$ even on edge-weighted directed planar graphs. (2) Assuming the Exponential-Time Hypothesis, Steiner Tree on undirected planar graphs cannot be solved in time $2^{o(k)} \cdot n^{O(1)}$, even in the unit-weight setting. (3) Steiner Tree can be solved in time $n^{O(\sqrt{k})} \cdot W$ on undirected planar graphs with maximum edge weight $W$. A direct corollary of the combination of our results for Steiner Tree is that this problem does not admit a parameter-preserving polynomial kernel on planar graphs unless ETH fails.
  • A simple digraph is semi-complete if for any two of its vertices $u$ and $v$, at least one of the arcs $(u,v)$ and $(v,u)$ is present. We study the complexity of computing two layout parameters of semi-complete digraphs: cutwidth and optimal linear arrangement (OLA). We prove that: (1) Both parameters are $\mathsf{NP}$-hard to compute and the known exact and parameterized algorithms for them have essentially optimal running times, assuming the Exponential Time Hypothesis; (2) The cutwidth parameter admits a quadratic Turing kernel, whereas it does not admit any polynomial kernel unless $\mathsf{NP}\subseteq \mathsf{coNP}/\textrm{poly}$. By contrast, OLA admits a linear kernel. These results essentially complete the complexity analysis of computing cutwidth and OLA on semi-complete digraphs. Our techniques can be also used to analyze the sizes of minimal obstructions for having small cutwidth under the induced subdigraph relation.
  • We study nowhere dense classes of graphs, recently introduced by Nesetril and Ossona de Mendez. Firstly, we provide a new proof for the fact that these classes are uniformly quasi-wide, improving previously known bounds between the two equivalent notions. Secondly, we give a new combinatorial proof of the result of Adler and Adler stating that nowhere dense classes of graphs are stable. In contrast to the original proof, our proof is completely finitistic and yields explicit bounds for ladder indices of first-order formulas on nowhere dense classes of graphs.
  • A successor-invariant first-order formula is a formula that has access to an auxiliary successor relation on a structure's universe, but the model relation is independent of the particular interpretation of this relation. It is well known that successor-invariant formulas are more expressive on finite structures than plain first-order formulas without a successor relation. This naturally raises the question whether this increase in expressive power comes at an extra cost to solve the model-checking problem, that is, the problem to decide whether a given structure together with some (and hence every) successor relation is a model of a given formula. It was shown earlier that adding successor-invariance to first-order logic essentially comes at no extra cost for the model-checking problem on classes of finite structures whose underlying Gaifman graph is planar [Engelmann et al., 2012], excludes a fixed minor [Eickmeyer et al., 2013] or a fixed topological minor [Eickmeyer and Kawarabayashi, 2016; Kreutzer et al., 2016]. In this work we show that the model-checking problem for successor-invariant formulas is fixed-parameter tractable on any class of finite structures whose underlying Gaifman graphs form a class of bounded expansion. Our result generalises all earlier results and comes close to the best tractability results on nowhere dense classes of graphs currently known for plain first-order logic.
  • In the Edge Bipartization problem one is given an undirected graph $G$ and an integer $k$, and the question is whether $k$ edges can be deleted from $G$ so that it becomes bipartite. In 2006, Guo et al. [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., 72(8):1386-1396, 2006] proposed an algorithm solving this problem in time $O(2^k m^2)$; today, this algorithm is a textbook example of an application of the iterative compression technique. Despite extensive progress in the understanding of the parameterized complexity of graph separation problems in the recent years, no significant improvement upon this result has been yet reported. We present an algorithm for Edge Bipartization that works in time $O(1.977^k nm)$, which is the first algorithm with the running time dependence on the parameter better than $2^k$. To this end, we combine the general iterative compression strategy of Guo et al. [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., 72(8):1386-1396, 2006], the technique proposed by Wahlstrom [SODA 2014, 1762-1781] of using a polynomial-time solvable relaxation in the form of a Valued Constraint Satisfaction Problem to guide a bounded-depth branching algorithm, and an involved Measure & Conquer analysis of the recursion tree.
  • We introduce the concept of low rank-width colorings, generalising the notion of low tree-depth colorings introduced by Ne\v{s}et\v{r}il and Ossona de Mendez in [Grad and classes with bounded expansion I. Decompositions. EJC, 2008]. We say that a class $\mathcal{C}$ of graphs admits low rank-width colourings if there exist functions $N\colon \mathbb{N}\rightarrow\mathbb{N}$ and $Q\colon \mathbb{N}\rightarrow\mathbb{N}$ such that for all $p\in \mathbb{N}$, every graph $G\in \mathcal{C}$ can be vertex colored with at most $N(p)$ colors such that the union of any $i\leq p$ color classes induces a subgraph of rank-width at most $Q(i)$. Graph classes admitting low rank-width colorings strictly generalize graph classes admitting low tree-depth colorings and graph classes of bounded rank-width. We prove that for every graph class $\mathcal{C}$ of bounded expansion and every positive integer $r$, the class $\{G^r\colon G\in \mathcal{C}\}$ of $r$th powers of graphs from $\mathcal{C}$, as well as the classes of unit interval graphs and bipartite permutation graphs admit low rank-width colorings. All of these classes have unbounded rank-width and do not admit low tree-depth colorings. We also show that the classes of interval graphs and permutation graphs do not admit low rank-width colorings. As interesting side properties, we prove that every graph class admitting low rank-width colorings has the Erd\H{o}s-Hajnal property and is $\chi$-bounded.
  • In the multicoloring problem, also known as ($a$:$b$)-coloring or $b$-fold coloring, we are given a graph G and a set of $a$ colors, and the task is to assign a subset of $b$ colors to each vertex of G so that adjacent vertices receive disjoint color subsets. This natural generalization of the classic coloring problem (the $b=1$ case) is equivalent to finding a homomorphism to the Kneser graph $KG_{a,b}$, and gives relaxations approaching the fractional chromatic number. We study the complexity of determining whether a graph has an ($a$:$b$)-coloring. Our main result is that this problem does not admit an algorithm with running time $f(b)\cdot 2^{o(\log b)\cdot n}$, for any computable $f(b)$, unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH) fails. A $(b+1)^n\cdot \text{poly}(n)$-time algorithm due to Nederlof [2008] shows that this is tight. A direct corollary of our result is that the graph homomorphism problem does not admit a $2^{O(n+h)}$ algorithm unless ETH fails, even if the target graph is required to be a Kneser graph. This refines the understanding given by the recent lower bound of Cygan et al. [SODA 2016]. The crucial ingredient in our hardness reduction is the usage of detecting matrices of Lindstr\"om [Canad. Math. Bull., 1965], which is a combinatorial tool that, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been used for proving complexity lower bounds. As a side result, we prove that the running time of the algorithms of Abasi et al. [MFCS 2014] and of Gabizon et al. [ESA 2015] for the r-monomial detection problem are optimal under ETH.
  • Cutwidth is one of the classic layout parameters for graphs. It measures how well one can order the vertices of a graph in a linear manner, so that the maximum number of edges between any prefix and its complement suffix is minimized. As graphs of cutwidth at most $k$ are closed under taking immersions, the results of Robertson and Seymour imply that there is a finite list of minimal immersion obstructions for admitting a cut layout of width at most $k$. We prove that every minimal immersion obstruction for cutwidth at most $k$ has size at most $2^{O(k^3\log k)}$. As an interesting algorithmic byproduct, we design a new fixed-parameter algorithm for computing the cutwidth of a graph that runs in time $2^{O(k^2\log k)}\cdot n$, where $k$ is the optimum width and $n$ is the number of vertices. While being slower by a $\log k$-factor in the exponent than the fastest known algorithm, given by Thilikos, Bodlaender, and Serna in [Cutwidth I: A linear time fixed parameter algorithm, J. Algorithms, 56(1):1--24, 2005] and [Cutwidth II: Algorithms for partial $w$-trees of bounded degree, J. Algorithms, 56(1):25--49, 2005], our algorithm has the advantage of being simpler and self-contained; arguably, it explains better the combinatorics of optimum-width layouts.
  • The classic algorithm of Bodlaender and Kloks [J. Algorithms, 1996] solves the following problem in linear fixed-parameter time: given a tree decomposition of a graph of (possibly suboptimal) width $k$, compute an optimum-width tree decomposition of the graph. In this work, we prove that this problem can also be solved in MSO in the following sense: for every positive integer $k$, there is an MSO transduction from tree decompositions of width $k$ to tree decompositions of optimum width. Together with our recent results [LICS 2016], this implies that for every $k$ there exists an MSO transduction which inputs a graph of treewidth $k$, and nondeterministically outputs its tree decomposition of optimum width. We also show that MSO transductions can be implemented in linear fixed-parameter time, which enables us to derive the algorithmic result of Bodlaender and Kloks as a corollary of our main result.
  • We prove that whenever $G$ is a graph from a nowhere dense graph class $\mathcal{C}$, and $A$ is a subset of vertices of $G$, then the number of subsets of $A$ that are realized as intersections of $A$ with $r$-neighborhoods of vertices of $G$ is at most $f(r,\epsilon)\cdot |A|^{1+\epsilon}$, where $r$ is any positive integer, $\epsilon$ is any positive real, and $f$ is a function that depends only on the class $\mathcal{C}$. This yields a characterization of nowhere dense classes of graphs in terms of neighborhood complexity, which answers a question posed by Reidl et al. As an algorithmic application of the above result, we show that for every fixed $r$, the parameterized Distance-$r$ Dominating Set problem admits an almost linear kernel on any nowhere dense graph class. This proves a conjecture posed by Drange et al., and shows that the limit of parameterized tractability of Distance-$r$ Dominating Set on subgraph-closed graph classes lies exactly on the boundary between nowhere denseness and somewhere denseness.
  • Consider the Maximum Weight Independent Set problem for rectangles: given a family of weighted axis-parallel rectangles in the plane, find a maximum-weight subset of non-overlapping rectangles. The problem is notoriously hard both in the approximation and in the parameterized setting. The best known polynomial-time approximation algorithms achieve super-constant approximation ratios [Chalermsook and Chuzhoy, SODA 2009; Chan and Har-Peled, Discrete & Comp. Geometry 2012], even though there is a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximation running in quasi-polynomial time [Adamaszek and Wiese, FOCS 2013; Chuzhoy and Ene, FOCS 2016]. When parameterized by the target size of the solution, the problem is $\mathsf{W}[1]$-hard even in the unweighted setting [Marx, FOCS 2007]. To achieve tractability, we study the following shrinking model: one is allowed to shrink each input rectangle by a multiplicative factor $1-\delta$ for some fixed $\delta>0$, but the performance is still compared against the optimal solution for the original, non-shrunk instance. We prove that in this regime, the problem admits an EPTAS with running time $f(\epsilon,\delta)\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, and an FPT algorithm with running time $f(k,\delta)\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, in the setting where a maximum-weight solution of size at most $k$ is to be computed. This improves and significantly simplifies a PTAS given earlier for this problem [Adamaszek et al., APPROX 2015], and provides the first parameterized results for the shrinking model. Furthermore, we explore kernelization in the shrinking model, by giving efficient kernelization procedures for several variants of the problem when the input rectangles are squares.
  • A vertex subset $S$ in a graph $G$ is a dominating set if every vertex not contained in $S$ has a neighbor in $S$. A dominating set $S$ is a connected dominating set if the subgraph $G[S]$ induced by $S$ is connected. A connected dominating set $S$ is a minimal connected dominating set if no proper subset of $S$ is also a connected dominating set. We prove that there exists a constant $\varepsilon > 10^{-50}$ such that every graph $G$ on $n$ vertices has at most $O(2^{(1-\varepsilon)n})$ minimal connected dominating sets. For the same $\varepsilon$ we also give an algorithm with running time $2^{(1-\varepsilon)n}\cdot n^{O(1)}$ to enumerate all minimal connected dominating sets in an input graph $G$.
  • Strip packing is a classical packing problem, where the goal is to pack a set of rectangular objects into a strip of a given width, while minimizing the total height of the packing. The problem has multiple applications, e.g. in scheduling and stock-cutting, and has been studied extensively. When the dimensions of objects are allowed to be exponential in the total input size, it is known that the problem cannot be approximated within a factor better than $3/2$, unless $\mathrm{P}=\mathrm{NP}$. However, there was no corresponding lower bound for polynomially bounded input data. In fact, Nadiradze and Wiese [SODA 2016] have recently proposed a $(1.4 + \epsilon)$ approximation algorithm for this variant, thus showing that strip packing with polynomially bounded data can be approximated better than when exponentially large values in the input data are allowed. Their result has subsequently been improved to a $(4/3 + \epsilon)$ approximation by two independent research groups [FSTTCS 2016, arXiv:1610.04430]. This raises a question whether strip packing with polynomially bounded input data admits a quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, as is the case for related two-dimensional packing problems like maximum independent set of rectangles or two-dimensional knapsack. In this paper we answer this question in negative by proving that it is NP-hard to approximate strip packing within a factor better than $12/11$, even when admitting only polynomially bounded input data. In particular, this shows that the strip packing problem admits no quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, unless $\mathrm{NP} \subseteq \mathrm{DTIME}(2^{\mathrm{polylog}(n)})$.
  • Suppose $\mathcal{F}$ is a finite family of graphs. We consider the following meta-problem, called $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion: given a graph $G$ and integer $k$, decide whether the deletion of at most $k$ edges of $G$ can result in a graph that does not contain any graph from $\mathcal{F}$ as an immersion. This problem is a close relative of the $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion problem studied by Fomin et al. [FOCS 2012], where one deletes vertices in order to remove all minor models of graphs from $\mathcal{F}$. We prove that whenever all graphs from $\mathcal{F}$ are connected and at least one graph of $\mathcal{F}$ is planar and subcubic, then the $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion problem admits: a constant-factor approximation algorithm running in time $O(m^3 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$; a linear kernel that can be computed in time $O(m^4 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$; and a $O(2^{O(k)} + m^4 \cdot n^3 \cdot \log m)$-time fixed-parameter algorithm, where $n,m$ count the vertices and edges of the input graph. These results mirror the findings of Fomin et al. [FOCS 2012], who obtained a similar set of algorithmic results for $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion, under the assumption that at least one graph from $\mathcal{F}$ is planar. An important difference is that we are able to obtain a linear kernel for $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion, while the exponent of the kernel of Fomin et al. for $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion depends heavily on the family $\mathcal{F}$. In fact, this dependence is unavoidable under plausible complexity assumptions, as proven by Giannopoulou et al. [ICALP 2015]. This reveals that the kernelization complexity of $\mathcal{F}$-Immersion Deletion is quite different than that of $\mathcal{F}$-Minor Deletion.
  • We introduce a new technique for designing fixed-parameter algorithms for cut problems, namely randomized contractions. We apply our framework to obtain the first FPT algorithm for the Unique Label Cover problem and new FPT algorithms with exponential speed up for the Steiner Cut and Node Multiway Cut-Uncut problems. More precisely, we show the following: - We prove that the parameterized version of the Unique Label Cover problem, which is the base of the Unique Games Conjecture, can be solved in 2^{O(k^2\log |\Sigma|)}n^4\log n deterministic time (even in the stronger, vertex-deletion variant) where k is the number of unsatisfied edges and |\Sigma| is the size of the alphabet. As a consequence, we show that one can in polynomial time solve instances of Unique Games where the number of edges allowed not to be satisfied is upper bounded by O(\sqrt{\log n}) to optimality, which improves over the trivial O(1) upper bound. - We prove that the Steiner Cut problem can be solved in 2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^4\log n deterministic time and \tilde{O}(2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^2) randomized time where k is the size of the cutset. This result improves the double exponential running time of the recent work of Kawarabayashi and Thorup (FOCS'11). - We show how to combine considering `cut' and `uncut' constraints at the same time. More precisely, we define a robust problem Node Multiway Cut-Uncut that can serve as an abstraction of introducing uncut constraints, and show that it admits an algorithm running in 2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^4\log n deterministic time where k is the size of the cutset. To the best of our knowledge, the only known way of tackling uncut constraints was via the approach of Marx, O'Sullivan and Razgon (STACS'10), which yields algorithms with double exponential running time. An interesting aspect of our technique is that, unlike important separators, it can handle real weights.
  • The generalised colouring numbers $\mathrm{adm}_r(G)$, $\mathrm{col}_r(G)$, and $\mathrm{wcol}_r(G)$ were introduced by Kierstead and Yang as generalisations of the usual colouring number, also known as the degeneracy of a graph, and have since then found important applications in the theory of bounded expansion and nowhere dense classes of graphs, introduced by Ne\v{s}et\v{r}il and Ossona de Mendez. In this paper, we study the relation of the colouring numbers with two other measures that characterise nowhere dense classes of graphs, namely with uniform quasi-wideness, studied first by Dawar et al. in the context of preservation theorems for first-order logic, and with the splitter game, introduced by Grohe et al. We show that every graph excluding a fixed topological minor admits a universal order, that is, one order witnessing that the colouring numbers are small for every value of $r$. Finally, we use our construction of such orders to give a new proof of a result of Eickmeyer and Kawarabayashi, showing that the model-checking problem for successor-invariant first-order formulas is fixed-parameter tractable on classes of graphs with excluded topological minors.
  • Dynamic programming on path and tree decompositions of graphs is a technique that is ubiquitous in the field of parameterized and exponential-time algorithms. However, one of its drawbacks is that the space usage is exponential in the decomposition's width. Following the work of Allender et al. [Theory of Computing, '14], we investigate whether this space complexity explosion is unavoidable. Using the idea of reparameterization of Cai and Juedes [J. Comput. Syst. Sci., '03], we prove that the question is closely related to a conjecture that the Longest Common Subsequence problem parameterized by the number of input strings does not admit an algorithm that simultaneously uses XP time and FPT space. Moreover, we complete the complexity landscape sketched for pathwidth and treewidth by Allender et al. by considering the parameter tree-depth. We prove that computations on tree-depth decompositions correspond to a model of non-deterministic machines that work in polynomial time and logarithmic space, with access to an auxiliary stack of maximum height equal to the decomposition's depth. Together with the results of Allender et al., this describes a hierarchy of complexity classes for polynomial-time non-deterministic machines with different restrictions on the access to working space, which mirrors the classic relations between treewidth, pathwidth, and tree-depth.
  • We prove a conjecture of Courcelle, which states that a graph property is definable in MSO with modular counting predicates on graphs of constant treewidth if, and only if it is recognizable in the following sense: constant-width tree decompositions of graphs satisfying the property can be recognized by tree automata. While the forward implication is a classic fact known as Courcelle's theorem, the converse direction remained open
  • We prove the following theorem. Given a planar graph $G$ and an integer $k$, it is possible in polynomial time to randomly sample a subset $A$ of vertices of $G$ with the following properties: (i) $A$ induces a subgraph of $G$ of treewidth $\mathcal{O}(\sqrt{k}\log k)$, and (ii) for every connected subgraph $H$ of $G$ on at most $k$ vertices, the probability that $A$ covers the whole vertex set of $H$ is at least $(2^{\mathcal{O}(\sqrt{k}\log^2 k)}\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)})^{-1}$, where $n$ is the number of vertices of $G$. Together with standard dynamic programming techniques for graphs of bounded treewidth, this result gives a versatile technique for obtaining (randomized) subexponential parameterized algorithms for problems on planar graphs, usually with running time bound $2^{\mathcal{O}(\sqrt{k} \log^2 k)} n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$. The technique can be applied to problems expressible as searching for a small, connected pattern with a prescribed property in a large host graph, examples of such problems include Directed $k$-Path, Weighted $k$-Path, Vertex Cover Local Search, and Subgraph Isomorphism, among others. Up to this point, it was open whether these problems can be solved in subexponential parameterized time on planar graphs, because they are not amenable to the classic technique of bidimensionality. Furthermore, all our results hold in fact on any class of graphs that exclude a fixed apex graph as a minor, in particular on graphs embeddable in any fixed surface.