• We present Spitzer Space Telescope time-series photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m of 2MASS J11193254$-$1137466AB and WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3, two planetary-mass, late-type ($\sim$L7) brown dwarf members of the $\sim$10 Myr old TW Hya Association. These observations were taken in order to investigate whether or not a tentative trend of increasing variability amplitude with decreasing surface gravity seen for L3-L5.5 dwarfs extends to later-L spectral types and to explore the angular momentum evolution of low-mass objects. We examine each light curve for variability and find a rotation period of 19.39$^{+0.33}_{-0.28}$ hours and semi-amplitudes of 0.798$^{+0.081}_{-0.083}$% at 3.6 $\mu$m and 1.108$^{+0.093}_{-0.094}$% at 4.5 $\mu$m for WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3. For 2MASS J11193254$-$1137466AB, we find a single period of 3.02$^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ hours with semi-amplitudes of 0.230$^{+0.036}_{-0.035}$% at 3.6 $\mu$m and 0.453 $\pm$ 0.037% at 4.5 $\mu$m, which we find is possibly due to the rotation of one component of the binary. Combining our results with 12 other late-type L dwarfs observed with Spitzer from the literature, we find no significant differences between the 3.6 $\mu$m amplitudes of low surface gravity and field gravity late-type L brown dwarfs at Spitzer wavelengths, and find tentative evidence (75% confidence) of higher amplitude variability at 4.5 $\mu$m for young, late-type Ls. We also find a median rotation period of young brown dwarfs (10-300 Myr) of $\sim$10 hr, more than twice the value of the median rotation period of field age brown dwarfs ($\sim$4 hr), a clear signature of brown dwarf rotational evolution.
  • Although the final observations of the Spitzer Warm Mission are currently scheduled for March 2019, it can continue operations through the end of the decade with no loss of photometric precision. As we will show, there is a strong science case for extending the current Warm Mission to December 2020. Spitzer has already made major impacts in the fields of exoplanets (including microlensing events), characterizing near Earth objects, enhancing our knowledge of nearby stars and brown dwarfs, understanding the properties and structure of our Milky Way galaxy, and deep wide-field extragalactic surveys to study galaxy birth and evolution. By extending Spitzer through 2020, it can continue to make ground-breaking discoveries in those fields, and provide crucial support to the NASA flagship missions JWST and WFIRST, as well as the upcoming TESS mission, and it will complement ground-based observations by LSST and the new large telescopes of the next decade. This scientific program addresses NASA's Science Mission Directive's objectives in astrophysics, which include discovering how the universe works, exploring how it began and evolved, and searching for life on planets around other stars.
  • Young brown dwarfs share many properties with directly imaged giant extrasolar planets. They therefore provide unique laboratories for investigating the full range of temperature and mass encompasses by the growing collection of planets discovered outside our Solar System. Furthermore, if they can be tied to a particular group of coeval stars, they also provide vital anchor points for low-mass empirical isochrones. We have developed a novel procedure for identifying such objects based on their unique 2MASS and AllWISE colors. Using our search criteria, we have identified 50 new, late-type L dwarf candidates, 47 of which are spectroscopically confirmed as L dwarfs with follow-up near-infrared spectroscopy. We evaluate the potential membership of these objects in nearby, young moving groups using their proper motions, photometric distance estimates, and spectroscopic indicators of youth, and find seven likely L-type members belonging to the $\beta$ Pictoris moving group, the AB Doradus moving group, the Tucana-Horologium association, or the Argus association, in addition to several lower probability members. Also found are two late-type (L5 and L6) potential members of the nearby Hyades cluster (WISEA J043642.75$+$190134.8 and WISEA J044105.56$+$213001.5).
  • We present optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of WISEA J061543.91$-$124726.8, which we rediscovered as a high motion object in the AllWISE survey. The spectra of this object are unusual; while the red optical ($\lambda >$ 7,000 \AA) and near-infrared spectra exhibit characteristic TiO, VO, and H$_{2}$O bands of a late-M dwarf, the blue portion of its optical spectrum shows a significant excess of emission relative to late-M type templates. The excess emission is relatively featureless, with the exception of a prominent and very broad Na I D doublet. We find that no single, ordinary star can reproduce these spectral characteristics. The most likely explanation is an unresolved binary system of an M7 dwarf and a cool white dwarf. The flux of a cool white dwarf drops in the optical red and near-infrared, due to collision-induced absorption, thus allowing the flux of a late-M dwarf to show through. This scenario, however, does not explain the Na D feature, which is unlike that of any known white dwarf, but which could perhaps be explained via unusual abundance or pressure conditions.
  • We have monitored photometrically the Y0 brown dwarf WISEP J173835.52+273258.9 (W1738) at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. This ~1 Gyr-old 400K dwarf is at a distance of 8pc and has a mass around 5 M_Jupiter. We observed W1738 using two near-infrared filters at lambda~1um, Y and J, on Gemini observatory, and two mid-infrared filters at lambda~4um, [3.6] and [4.5], on the Spitzer observatory. Twenty-four hours were spent on the source by Spitzer on each of June 30 and October 30 2013 UT. Between these observations, around 5 hours were spent on the source by Gemini on each of July 17 and August 23 2013 UT. The mid-infrared light curves show significant evolution between the two observations separated by four months. We find that a double sinusoid can be fit to the [4.5] data, where one sinusoid has a period of 6.0 +/- 0.1 hours and the other a period of 3.0 +/- 0.1 hours. The near-infrared observations suggest variability with a ~3.0 hour period, although only at a <~2 sigma confidence level. We interpret our results as showing that the Y dwarf has a 6.0 +/- 0.1 hour rotation period, with one or more large-scale surface features being the source of variability. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the light curve at [4.5] is 3%. The amplitude of the near-infrared variability, if real, may be as high as 5 to 30%. Intriguingly, this size of variability and the wavelength dependence can be reproduced by atmospheric models that include patchy KCl and Na_2S clouds and associated small changes in surface temperature. The small number of large features, and the timescale for evolution of the features, is very similar to what is seen in the atmospheres of the solar system gas giants.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) near-infrared photometry of the coldest known brown dwarf, WISE J085510.83$-$071442.5 (WISE 0855$-$0714). WISE 0855$-$0714 was observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard HST using the F105W, F125W, and F160W filters, which approximate the $Y$, $J$, and $H$ near-infrared bands. WISE 0855$-$0714 is undetected at F105W with a corresponding 2$\sigma$ magnitude limit of $\sim$26.9. We marginally detect WISE 0855$-$0714 in the F125W images (S/N $\sim$4), with a measured magnitude of 26.41 $\pm$ 0.27, more than a magnitude fainter than the $J-$band magnitude reported by Faherty and coworkers. WISE J0855$-$0714 is clearly detected in the F160W band, with a magnitude of 23.90 $\pm$ 0.02, the first secure detection of WISE 0855$-$0714 in the near-infrared. Based on these data, we find that WISE 0855$-$0714 has extremely red F105W$-$F125W and F125W$-$F160W colors relative to other known Y dwarfs. We find that when compared to the models of Saumon et al. and Morley et al., the F105W$-$F125W and F125W$-$F160W colors of WISE 0855$-$0714 cannot be accounted for simultaneously. These colors likely indicate that we are seeing the collapse of flux on the Wien tail for this extremely cold object.
  • We use the AllWISE Data Release to continue our search for WISE-detected motions. In this paper, we publish another 27,846 motion objects, bringing the total number to 48,000 when objects found during our original AllWISE motion survey are included. We use this list, along with the lists of confirmed WISE-based motion objects from the recent papers by Luhman and by Schneider et al. and candidate motion objects from the recent paper by Gagne et al. to search for widely separated, common-proper-motion systems. We identify 1,039 such candidate systems. All 48,000 objects are further analyzed using color-color and color-mag plots to provide possible characterizations prior to spectroscopic follow-up. We present spectra of 172 of these, supplemented with new spectra of 23 comparison objects from the literature, and provide classifications and physical interpretations of interesting sources. Highlights include: (1) the identification of three G/K dwarfs that can be used as standard candles to study clumpiness and grain size in nearby molecular clouds because these objects are currently moving behind the clouds, (2) the confirmation/discovery of several M, L, and T dwarfs and one white dwarf whose spectrophotometric distance estimates place them 5-20 pc from the Sun, (3) the suggestion that the Na 'D' line be used as a diagnostic tool for interpreting and classifying metal-poor late-M and L dwarfs, (4) the recognition of a triple system including a carbon dwarf and late-M subdwarf, for which model fits of the late-M subdwarf (giving [Fe/H] ~ -1.0) provide a measured metallicity for the carbon star, and (5) a possible 24-pc-distant K5 dwarf + peculiar red L5 system with an apparent physical separation of 0.1 pc.
  • We present WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3, a young, low-mass, high probability member of the TW Hya association. WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3 was discovered based on its red AllWISE color (W1$-$W2 = 0.63 mag) and extremely red 2MASS $J-K_{\rm S}$ color ($>$ 2.64 mag), the latter of which is confirmed with near-infrared photometry from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey ($J-K_{\rm S}$ = 2.57$\pm$0.03). Follow-up near-infrared spectroscopy shows a spectral type of L7 $\pm$ 1 as well as several spectroscopic indicators of youth. These include a peaked $H$-band shape and a steeper $K$-band slope, traits typically attributed to low surface gravity. The sky position, proper motion, and distance estimates of WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3 are all consistent with membership in the $\sim$10 Myr old TW Hya association. Using the age of the TW Hya association and evolutionary models, we estimate the mass of WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3 to be 5$-$13 $M_{\rm Jup}$, making it one of the youngest and lowest mass free-floating objects yet discovered in the Solar neighborhood.
  • We present the first detection of photometric variability of a spectroscopically-confirmed Y dwarf. The Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope was used to obtain times series photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over a twenty four hour period at two different epochs separated by 149 days. Variability is evident at 4.5 um in the first epoch and at 3.6 and 4.5 um in the second epoch which suggests that the underlying cause or causes of this variability change on the timescales of months. The second-epoch [3.6] and [4.5] light curves are nearly sinusoidal in form, in phase, have periods of roughly 8.5 hours, and have semi-amplitudes of 3.5%. We find that a simple geometric spot model with a single bright spot reproduces these observations well. We also compare our measured semi-amplitudes of the second epoch light curves to predictions of the static, one-dimensional, partly cloudy and hot spot models of Morley and collaborators and find that neither set of models can reproduce the observed [3.6] and[4.5] semi-amplitudes simultaneously. More advanced two- or three-dimensional models that include time-dependent phenomena like vertical mixing, cloud formation, and thermal relaxation are therefore sorely needed in order to properly interpret our observations.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) was reactivated in December of 2013 (NEOWISE) to search for potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. We have conducted a survey using the first sky pass of NEOWISE data and the AllWISE catalog to identify nearby stars and brown dwarfs with large proper motions ($\mu_{\rm total}$ $\gtrsim$ 250 mas yr$^{-1}$). A total of 20,548 high proper motion objects were identified, 1,006 of which are new discoveries. This survey has uncovered a significantly larger sample of fainter objects (W2 $\gtrsim$13 mag) than the previous WISE motion surveys of Luhman (2014a) and Kirkpatrick et al. (2014). Many of these objects are predicted to be new L and T dwarfs based on near- and mid-infrared colors. Using estimated spectral types along with distance estimates, we have identified several objects likely belonging to the nearby Solar neighborhood (d $<$ 25 pc). We have followed up 19 of these new discoveries with near-infrared or optical spectroscopy, focusing on potentially nearby objects, objects with the latest predicted spectral types, and potential late-type subdwarfs. This subset includes 6 M dwarfs, 5 of which are likely subdwarfs, as well as 8 L dwarfs and 5 T dwarfs, many of which have blue near-infrared colors. As an additional supplement, we provide 2MASS and AllWISE positions and photometry for every object found in our search, as well as 2MASS/AllWISE calculated proper motions.
  • During the "WISE at 5: Legacy and Prospects" conference in Pasadena, CA -- which ran from February 10 - 12, 2015 -- attendees were invited to engage in an interactive session exploring the future uses of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. The 65 participants -- many of whom are extensive users of the data -- brainstormed the top questions still to be answered by the mission, as well as the complementary current and future datasets and additional processing of WISE/NEOWISE data that would aid in addressing these most important scientific questions. The results were mainly bifurcated between topics related to extragalactic studies (e.g. AGN, QSOs) and substellar mass objects. In summary, participants found that complementing WISE/NEOWISE data with cross-correlated multiwavelength surveys (e.g. SDSS, Pan-STARRS, LSST, Gaia, Euclid, etc.) would be highly beneficial for all future mission goals. Moreover, developing or implementing machine-learning tools to comb through and understand cross-correlated data was often mentioned for future uses. Finally, attendees agreed that additional processing of the data such as co-adding WISE and NEOWISE and extracting a multi-epoch photometric database and parallax and proper motion catalog would greatly improve the scientific results of the most important projects identified. In that respect, a project such as MaxWISE which would execute the most important additional processing and extraction as well as make the data and catalogs easily accessible via a public portal was deemed extremely important.
  • We present a sample of brown dwarfs identified with the {\it Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) for which we have obtained {\it Hubble Space Telescope} ({\it HST}) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared grism spectroscopy. The sample (twenty-two in total) was observed with the G141 grism covering 1.10$-$1.70 $\mu$m, while fifteen were also observed with the G102 grism, which covers 0.90$-$1.10 $\mu$m. The additional wavelength coverage provided by the G102 grism allows us to 1) search for spectroscopic features predicted to emerge at low effective temperatures (e.g.\ ammonia bands) and 2) construct a smooth spectral sequence across the T/Y boundary. We find no evidence of absorption due to ammonia in the G102 spectra. Six of these brown dwarfs are new discoveries, three of which are found to have spectral types of T8 or T9. The remaining three, WISE J082507.35$+$280548.5 (Y0.5), WISE J120604.38$+$840110.6 (Y0), and WISE J235402.77$+$024015.0 (Y1) are the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to date. We also present {\it HST} grism spectroscopy and reevaluate the spectral types of five brown dwarfs for which spectral types have been determined previously using other instruments.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft has been reactivated as NEOWISE-R to characterize and search for Near Earth Objects. The brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5 has now been reobserved by NEOWISE-R, and we confirm the results of Luhman (2014b), who found a very low effective temperature ($\approx 250$ K), a very high proper motion (8.1 +/- 0.1 arcsec/yr) , and a large parallax (454 +/- 45 mas). The large proper motion has separated the brown dwarf from the background sources that influenced the 2010 WISE data, allowing a measurement of a very red WISE color of W1-W2 $> 3.9$ mag. A re-analysis of the 2010 WISE astrometry using only the W2 band, combined with the new NEOWISE-R 2014 position, gives an improved parallax of 448 +/- 33 mas and proper motion of 8.08 +/- 0.05\; arcsec/yr. These are all consistent with Luhman (2014b).
  • We present Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics observations of the brown dwarf WISEP J061135.13-041024.0 showing it is a binary with a component separation of 0.4". This system is one of the six known resolved binaries in which the magnitude differences between the components show a reversal in sign between the Y/J band and the H/K bands. Deconvolution of the composite spectrum results in a best fit binary solution with L9 and T1.5 components. We also present a preliminary parallax placing the system at a distance of 21.2+/-1.3 pc. Using the distance and resolved magnitudes we are able to place WISEP J061135.13-041024.0AB on a color-absolute magnitude diagram, showing that this system contributes to the well-known "J-band bump" and the components' properties appear similar to other late-type L and early-type T dwarfs. Fitting our data to a set of cloudy atmosphere models suggests the system has an age >1 Gyr with WISEP J061135.13-041024.0A having an effective temperature (Teff) of 1275-1325 K and mass of 64-65 M_Jup, and WISEP J061135.13-041024.0B having Teff = 1075-1115 K and mass 40-65 M_Jup.
  • We have determined astrometric positions for 15 WISE-discovered late-type brown dwarfs (6 T8-9 and 9 Y dwarfs) using the Keck II telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. Combining data from 8 to 20 epochs we derive parallactic and proper motions for these objects which put the majority within 15 parsecs. For ages greater than a few Gyr, as suggested from kinematic considerations, we find masses of 10-30 M$_{Jup}$ based on standard models for the evolution of low mass objects with a range of mass estimates for individual objects depending on the model in question. Three of the coolest objects have effective temperatures $\sim$ 350 K and inferred masses of 10-15 M$_{Jup}$. Our parallactic distances confirm earlier photometric estimates (Kirkpatrick et al. 2012) and direct measurements (Marsh et al. 2013, Beichman et al. 2013, Dupuy and Krauss 2013) and suggest that the number of objects with masses below about 15 M$_{Jup}$ must be flat or declining relative to higher mass objects. The masses of the coldest Y dwarfs may be similar to those inferred for recently imaged planet-mass companions to nearby young stars. Objects in this mass range, which appear to be rare in both the interstellar and proto-planetary environments, may both have formed via gravitational fragmentation: the brown dwarfs in interstellar clouds and companion objects in a protoplanetary disk. In both cases, however, the fact that objects in this mass range are relatively infrequent, suggests that this mechanism must be inefficient in both environments.
  • As part of a larger search of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data for cool brown dwarfs with effective temperatures less than 1000 K, we present the discovery of three new cool brown dwarfs with spectral types later than T7. Using low-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Hubble Space Telescope we derive spectral types of T9.5 for WISE J094305.98+360723.5, T8 for WISE J200050.19+362950.1, and Y0: for WISE J220905.73+271143.9. The identification of WISE J220905.73+271143.9 as a Y dwarf brings the total number of spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to seventeen. In addition, we present an improved spectrum (i.e. higher signal-to-noise ratio) of the Y0 dwarf WISE J041022.71+150248.4 that confirms the Cushing et al. classification of Y0. Spectrophotometric distance estimates place all three new brown dwarfs at distances less than 12 pc, with WISE J200050.19+362950.1 lying at a distance of only 3.9-8.0 pc. Finally, we note that brown dwarfs like WISE J200050.19+362950.1 that lie in or near the Galactic plane offer an exciting opportunity to measure their mass via astrometric microlensing.
  • The AllWISE processing pipeline has measured motions for all objects detected on WISE images taken between 2010 January and 2011 February. In this paper, we discuss new capabilities made to the software pipeline in order to make motion measurements possible, and we characterize the resulting data products for use by future researchers. Using a stringent set of selection criteria, we find 22,445 objects that have significant AllWISE motions, of which 3,525 have motions that can be independently confirmed from earlier 2MASS images yet lack any published motions in SIMBAD. Another 58 sources lack 2MASS counterparts and are presented as motion candidates only. Limited spectroscopic follow-up of this list has already revealed eight new L subdwarfs. These may provide the first hints of a "subdwarf gap" at mid-L types that would indicate the break between the stellar and substellar populations at low metallicities (i.e., old ages). Another object in the motion list -- WISEA J154045.67-510139.3 -- is a bright (J ~ 9 mag) object of type M6; both the spectrophotometric distance and a crude preliminary parallax place it ~6 pc from the Sun. We also compare our list of motion objects to the recently published list of 762 WISE motion objects from Luhman (2014). While these first large motion studies with WISE data have been very successful in revealing previously overlooked nearby dwarfs, both studies missed objects that the other found, demonstrating that many other nearby objects likely await discovery in the AllWISE data products.
  • While quality checking a new motion-aware co-addition of all 12.5 months of WISE data, the source WISE J070720.48+170533.0 was found to have moved 0.9 arc-sec in 6 months. Backtracking this motion allowed us to identify this source as 2MASS J07071961+1705464 and with several entries in the USNO B catalog. An astrometric fit to these archival data gives a proper motion of 1793 +/- 2 mas/yr and a parallax of 35 +/- 42 mas. Photometry from WISE, 2MASS and the POSS can be fit reasonably well by a blackbody with T = 3658 K and an angular radius of 4.36E-11 radians. No clear evidence of H_2 collision-induced absorption is seen in the near-IR. An optical spectrum shows broad deep CaH bands at 638 and 690 nm, broad deep Na D at 598.2 nm, and weak or absent TiO, indicating that this source is an ultra-subdwarf M star with a radial velocity about -21 +/- 18 km/sec relative to the Sun. Given its apparent magnitude, the distance is about 39 +/- 9 pc and the tangential velocity is probably about 330 km/sec, but a more precise parallax is needed to be certain.
  • We report the discovery of the L dwarf WISE J174102.78$-$464225.5, that was discovered as part of a search for nearby L dwarfs using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The distinct triangular peak of the H-band portion of its near-infrared spectrum and its red near-infrared colors ($J-K_S$ = 2.35$\pm$0.08 mag) are indicative of a young age. Via comparison to spectral standards and other red L dwarfs, we estimate a near-infrared spectral type to be L7$\pm$2 (pec). From a comparison to spectral and low-mass evolutionary models, we determine self-consistent effective temperature, log $g$, age, and mass values of 1450$\pm$100 K, 4.0$\pm$0.25 (cm s$^{-2}$), 10-100 Myr, and 4-21 M$_{Jup}$, respectively. With an estimated distance of 10-30 pc, we explore the possibility that WISE J174102.78-464225.5 belongs to one of the young nearby moving groups via a kinematic analysis and we find potential membership in the $\beta$ Pictoris or AB Doradus associations. A trigonometric parallax measurement and a precise radial velocity can help to secure its membership in either of these groups.
  • We have discovered a wide separation (188.5") T8 subdwarf companion to the sdM1.5+WD binary Wolf 1130. Companionship of WISE J200520.38+542433.9 is verified through common proper motion over a ~3 year baseline. Wolf 1130 is located 15.83 +/- 0.96 parsecs from the Sun, placing the brown dwarf at a projected separation of ~3000 AU. Near-infrared colors and medium resolution (R~2000-4000) spectroscopy establish the uniqueness of this system as a high-gravity, low-metallicity benchmark. Although there are a number of low-metallicity T dwarfs in the literature, WISE J200520.38+542433.9 has the most extreme inferred metallicity to date with [Fe/H] = -0.64 +/- 0.17 based on Wolf 1130. Model comparisons to this exemplar late-type subdwarf support it having an old age, a low metallicity, and a small radius. However, the spectroscopic peculiarities of WISE J200520.38+542433.9 underscore the importance of developing the low-metallicity parameter space of the most current atmospheric models.
  • We present the discovery of a very cold, very low mass, nearby brown dwarf using data from the NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The object, WISE J064723.23-623235.5, has a very red WISE color of W1-W2 > 3.77 mag and a very red Spitzer Space Telescope color of ch1-ch2 = 2.82+/-0.09 mag. In J_MKO-ch2 color (7.58+/-0.27 mag) it is one of the two or three reddest brown dwarfs known. Our grism spectrum from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) confirms it to be the seventeenth Y dwarf discovered, and its spectral type of Y1+/-0.5 makes it one of the four latest-type Y dwarfs classified. Astrometric imaging from Spitzer and HST, combined with data from WISE, provides a preliminary parallax of pi = 115+/-12 mas (d = 8.7+/-0.9 pc) and proper motion of mu = 387+/-25 mas/yr based on 2.5 years of monitoring. The spectrum implies a blue J-H color, for which model atmosphere calculations suggest a relatively low surface gravity. The best fit to these models indicates an effective temperature of 350-400K and a mass of ~5-30 M_Jup. Kinematic analysis hints that this object may belong to the Columba moving group, which would support an age of ~30 Myr and thus an even lower mass of <2 M_Jup, but verification would require a radial velocity measurement not currently possible for a J=22.7 mag brown dwarf.
  • In our effort to complete the census of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the immediate Solar Neighborhood, we present spectra, photometry, proper motions, and distance estimates for forty-two low-mass star and brown dwarf candidates discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We also present additional follow-up information on twelve candidates selected using WISE data but previously published elsewhere. The new discoveries include fifteen M dwarfs, seventeen L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and five objects of other type. Among these discoveries is a newly identified "unusually red L dwarf" (WISE J223527.07+451140.9), four peculiar L dwarfs whose spectra are most readily explained as unresolved L+T binary systems, and a T9 dwarf (WISE J124309.61+844547.8). We also show that the recently discovered red L dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (Gizis et al. 2012) may be a low-gravity object and hence young and potentially low mass (< 25 MJup).
  • We report the discovery of 87 new T dwarfs uncovered with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and three brown dwarfs with extremely red near-infrared colors that exhibit characteristics of both L and T dwarfs. Two of the new T dwarfs are likely binaries with L7+/-1 primaries and mid-type T secondaries. In addition, our follow-up program has confirmed 10 previously identified T dwarfs and four photometrically-selected L and T dwarf candidates in the literature. This sample, along with the previous WISE discoveries, triples the number of known brown dwarfs with spectral types later than T5. Using the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog we present updated color-color and color-type diagrams for all the WISE-discovered T and Y dwarfs. Near-infrared spectra of the new discoveries are presented, along with spectral classifications. To accommodate later T dwarfs we have modified the integrated flux method of determining spectral indices to instead use the median flux. Furthermore, a newly defined J-narrow index differentiates the early-type Y dwarfs from late-type T dwarfs based on the J-band continuum slope. The K/J indices for this expanded sample show that 32% of late-type T dwarfs have suppressed K-band flux and are blue relative to the spectral standards, while only 11% are redder than the standards. Comparison of the Y/J and K/J index to models suggests diverse atmospheric conditions and supports the possible re-emergence of clouds after the L/T transition. We also discuss peculiar brown dwarfs and candidates that were found not to be substellar, including two Young Stellar Objects and two Active Galactic Nuclei. The coolest WISE-discovered brown dwarfs are the closest of their type and will remain the only sample of their kind for many years to come.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has revealed a T8.5 brown dwarf (WISE J111838.70+312537.9) that exhibits common proper motion with a solar-neighborhood (8 pc) quadruple star system - Xi Ursae Majoris. The angular separation is 8.5 arc-min, and the projected physical separation is about 4000 AU. The sub-solar metallicity and low chromospheric activity of Xi UMa A argue that the system has an age of at least 2 Gyr. The infrared luminosity and color of the brown dwarf suggests the mass of this companion ranges between 14 and 38 Jupiter masses for system ages of 2 and 8 Gyr respectively.
  • We have monitored the position of the cool Y dwarf WISEPA J182831.08+265037.8 using a combination of ground- and space-based telescopes and have determined its distance to be 11.2$_{-1.0}^{+1.3}$ pc. Its absolute H magnitude, M$_H=22.21^{+0.25}_{-0.22}$ mag, suggests a mass in the range 0.5-20 M$_{Jup}$ for ages of 0.1-10 Gyr with an effective temperature in the range 250-400 K. The broad range in mass is due primarily to the unknown age of the object. Since the high tangential velocity of the object, 51$\pm5$ km s$^{-1}$, is characteristic of an old disk population, a plausible age range of 2-4 Gyr leads to a mass range of 3-6 M$_{Jup}$ based on fits to the (highly uncertain) COND evolutionary models. The range in temperature is due to the fact that no single model adequately represents the 1-5 $\mu$m spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source, failing by factors of up to 5 at either the short or long wavelength portions of the spectral energy distribution. The appearance of this very cold object may be affected by non-equilibrium chemistry or low temperature condensates forming clouds, two atmospheric processes that are known to be important in brown dwarf atmospheres but have proven difficult to model. Finally, we argue that there would have to be a very steep upturn in the number density of late type Y-dwarfs to account for the putative population of objects suggested by by recent microlensing observations. Whether WISE 1828+2650 sits at the low mass end of the brown dwarf population or is the first example of a large number of "free-floating" planets is not yet known.