• We demonstrate that deep good-seeing VLT/HAWK-I $K_\mathrm{s}$ images complemented with $g$+$z$-band photometry can yield a sensitivity for weak lensing studies of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts \mbox{$0.7\lesssim z \lesssim 1.1$}, which is almost identical to the sensitivity of HST/ACS mosaics of single-orbit depth. Key reasons for this good performance are the excellent image quality frequently achievable for $K_\mathrm{s}$ imaging from the ground, a highly effective photometric selection of background galaxies, and a galaxy ellipticity dispersion that is noticeably lower than for optically observed high-redshift galaxy samples. Incorporating results from the 3D-HST and UltraVISTA surveys we also obtained a more accurate calibration of the source redshift distribution than previously achieved for similar optical weak lensing data sets. Here we studied the extremely massive galaxy cluster RCS2$J$232727.7$-$020437 (\mbox{$z=0.699$}), combining deep VLT/\mbox{HAWK-I} $K_\mathrm{s}$ images (point spread function with a 0\farcs35 full width at half maximum) with LBT/LBC photometry. The resulting weak lensing mass reconstruction suggests that the cluster consists of a single overdensity, which is detected with a peak significance of $10.1\sigma$. We constrained the cluster mass to \mbox{$M_\mathrm{200c}/(10^{15} \mathrm{M}_\odot) =2.06^{+0.28}_{-0.26}(\mathrm{stat.})\pm 0.12 (\mathrm{sys.})$} assuming a spherical Navarro, Frenk \& White model and simulation-based priors on the concentration, making it one of the most massive galaxy clusters known in the \mbox{$z\gtrsim 0.7$} Universe. We also cross-checked the HAWK-I measurements through an analysis of overlapping HST/ACS images, yielding fully consistent estimates of the lensing signal.
  • Every star-forming galaxy has a halo of metal-enriched gas extending out to at least 100 kpc, as revealed by the absorption lines this gas imprints on the spectra of background quasars. However, quasars are sparse and typically probe only one narrow pencil beam through the intervening galaxy. Close quasar pairs and gravitationally lensed quasars have been used to circumvent this inherently one-dimensional technique, but these objects are rare and the structure of the circum-galactic medium remains poorly constrained. As a result, our understanding of the physical processes that drive the re-cycling of baryons across the lifetime of a galaxy is limited. Here we report integral-field (tomographic) spectroscopy of an extended background source -a bright giant gravitational arc. We can thus coherently map the spatial and kinematic distribution of Mg II absorption -a standard tracer of enriched gas- in an intervening galaxy system at redshift 0.98 (i.e., ~8 Gyr ago). Our gravitational-arc tomography unveils a clumpy medium in which the absorption-strength decreases with increasing impact parameter, in good agreement with the statistics towards quasars; furthermore, we find strong evidence that the gas is not distributed isotropically. Interestingly, we detect little kinematic variation over a projected area of ~600 kpc squared, with all line-of-sight velocities confined to within a few tens of km/s of each other. These results suggest that the detected absorption originates from entrained recycled material, rather than in a galactic outflow.
  • We report the detection of extended Lyman-$\alpha$ emission from the host galaxy of SDSS~J2222+2745, a strongly lensed quasar at $z = 2.8$. Spectroscopic follow-up clearly reveals extended Lyman-$\alpha$ in emission between two images of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We reconstruct the lensed quasar host galaxy in the source plane by applying a strong lens model to HST imaging, and resolve spatial scales as small as $\sim$200 parsecs. In the source plane we recover the host galaxy morphology to within a few hundred parsecs of the central AGN, and map the extended Lyman-$\alpha$ emission to its physical origin on one side of the host galaxy at radii $\sim$0.5-2 kpc from the central AGN. There are clear morphological differences between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and rest-frame ultraviolet stellar continuum emission from the quasar host galaxy. Furthermore, the relative velocity profiles of quasar Lyman-$\alpha$, host galaxy Lyman-$\alpha$, and metal lines in outflowing gas reveal differences in the absorbing material affecting the AGN and host galaxy. These data indicate the presence of patchy local intervening gas in front of the central quasar and its host galaxy. This interpretation is consistent with the central luminous quasar being obscured across a substantial fraction of its surrounding solid angle, resulting in strong anisotropy in the exposure of the host galaxy to ionizing radiation from the AGN. This work demonstrates the power of strong lensing-assisted studies to probe spatial scales that are currently inaccessible by other means.
  • We present measurements of the surface density of star formation, the star-forming clump luminosity function, and the clump size distribution function, for the lensed galaxy SGAS J111020.0+645950.8 at a redshift of z=2.481. The physical size scales that we probe, radii r=30--50 pc, are considerably smaller scales than have yet been studied at these redshifts. The star formation surface density we find within these small clumps is consistent with surface densities measured previously for other lensed galaxies at similar redshift. Twenty-two percent of the rest-frame ultraviolet light in this lensed galaxy arises from small clumps, with r<100 pc. Within the range of overlap, the clump luminosity function measured for this lensed galaxy is remarkably similar to those of z~0 galaxies. In this galaxy, star-forming regions smaller than 100 pc---physical scales not usually resolved at these redshifts by current telescopes---are important locations of star formation in the distant universe. If this galaxy is representative, this may contradict the theoretical picture in which the critical size scale for star formation in the distant universe is of order 1 kiloparsec. Instead, our results suggest that current telescopes have not yet resolved the critical size scales of star-forming activity in galaxies over most of cosmic time.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic study of 42 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in two samples of galaxy clusters chosen for a gravitational lensing study. The study's initial sample combines 25 BCGs from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) sample and 37 BCGs from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS) with a total redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.7. Using archival GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and Very Large Array data we determine the BCGs' stellar mass, radio power, and star formation rates. The radio power is higher than expected if due to star formation, consistent with the BCGs being active galactic nucleus (AGN)-powered radio sources. This suggests that the AGN and star formation are both fueled by cold gas in the host galaxy. The specific star formation rate (sSFR) is low and constant with redshift. The mean sSFR is 9.42 * 10^-12 yr^-1, which corresponds to a mass doubling time of 105 billion years. These findings are consistent with models for hierarchical formation of BCGs, which suggest that star formation is no longer a significant channel for galaxy growth for z < 1. Instead, stellar growth (of the order of a factor of at least two) during this period is expected to occur mainly via minor dry mergers
  • We present coarse but robust star formation histories (SFHs) derived from spectro-photometric data of the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS Survey, for 22,494 galaxies at 0.3<z<0.9 with stellar masses of 10^9 Msun to 10^12 Msun. Our study moves beyond "average" SFHs and distribution functions of specific star formation rates (sSFRs) to individually measured SFHs for tens of thousands of galaxies. By comparing star formation rates (SFRs) with timescales of 10^10, 10^9, and 10^8 years, we find a wide diversity of SFHs: 'old galaxies' that formed most or all of their stars early; galaxies that formed stars with declining or constant SFRs over a Hubble time, and genuinely 'young galaxies' that formed most of their stars since z=1. This sequence is one of decreasing stellar mass, but, remarkably, each type is found over a mass range of a factor of 10. Conversely, galaxies at any given mass follow a wide range of SFHs, leading us to conclude that: (1) halo mass does not uniquely determine SFHs; (2) there is no 'typical' evolutionary track; and (3) "abundance matching" has limitations as a tool for inferring physics. Our observations imply that SFHs are set at an early epoch, and that--for most galaxies--the decline and cessation of star formation occurs over a Hubble-time, without distinct "quenching" events. SFH diversity is inconsistent with models where galaxy mass, at any given epoch, grows simply along relations between SFR and stellar mass, but is consistent with a 2-parameter lognormal form, lending credence to this model from a new and independent perspective.
  • Gravitational lensing has become one of the most powerful tools available for investigating the 'dark side' of the universe. Cosmological strong gravitational lensing, in particular, probes the properties of the dense cores of dark matter halos over decades in mass and offers the opportunity to study the distant universe at flux levels and spatial resolutions otherwise unavailable. Studies of strongly-lensed variable sources offer yet further scientific opportunities. One of the challenges in realizing the potential of strong lensing is to understand the statistical context of both the individual systems that receive extensive follow-up study, as well as that of the larger samples of strong lenses that are now emerging from survey efforts. Motivated by these challenges, we have developed an image-simulation pipeline, PICS (Pipeline for Images of Cosmological Strong lensing) to generate realistic strong gravitational lensing signals from group and cluster scale lenses. PICS uses a low-noise and unbiased density estimator based on (resampled) Delaunay Tessellations to calculate the density field; lensed images are produced by ray-tracing images of actual galaxies from deep Hubble Space Telescope observations. Other galaxies, similarly sampled, are added to fill in the light cone. The pipeline further adds cluster-member galaxies and foreground stars into the lensed images. The entire image ensemble is then observed using a realistic point spread function which includes appropriate detector artifacts for bright stars. Noise is further added, including such non-Gaussian elements as noise window-paning from mosaiced observations, residual bad pixels, and cosmic rays. The aim is to produced simulated images that appear identical - to the eye (expert or otherwise) - to real observations in various imaging surveys.
  • SDSS J2222+2745 is a galaxy cluster at z=0.49, strongly lensing a quasar at z=2.805 into six widely separated images. In recent HST imaging of the field, we identify additional multiply lensed galaxies, and confirm the sixth quasar image that was identified by Dahle et al. (2013). We used the Gemini North telescope to measure a spectroscopic redshift of z=4.56 of one of the secondary lensed galaxies. These data are used to refine the lens model of SDSS J2222+2745, compute the time delay and magnifications of the lensed quasar images, and reconstruct the source image of the quasar host and a second lensed galaxy at z=2.3. This second galaxy also appears in absorption in our Gemini spectra of the lensed quasar, at a projected distance of 34 kpc. Our model is in agreement with the recent time delay measurements of Dahle et al. (2015), who found tAB=47.7+/-6.0 days and tAC=-722+/-24 days. We use the observed time delays to further constrain the model, and find that the model-predicted time delays of the three faint images of the quasar are tAD=502+/-68 days, tAE=611+/-75 days, and tAF=415+/-72 days. We have initiated a follow-up campaign to measure these time delays with Gemini North. Finally, we present initial results from an X-ray monitoring program with Swift, indicating the presence of hard X-ray emission from the lensed quasar, as well as extended X-ray emission from the cluster itself, which is consistent with the lensing mass measurement and the cluster velocity dispersion.
  • We present a source-plane reconstruction of a ${\it Herschel}$ and ${\it Planck}$-detected gravitationally-lensed dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) at $z=1.68$ using {\it Hubble}, Sub-millimeter Array (SMA), and Keck observations. The background sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG) is strongly lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at $z=0.997$ and appears as an arc of length $\sim 15^{\prime \prime}$ in the optical images. The continuum dust emission, as seen by SMA, is limited to a single knot within this arc. We present a lens model with source plane reconstructions at several wavelengths to show the difference in magnification between the stars and dust, and highlight the importance of a multi-wavelength lens models for studies involving lensed DSFGs. We estimate the physical properties of the galaxy by fitting the flux densities to model SEDs leading to a magnification-corrected star formation rate of $390 \pm 60$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and a stellar mass of $1.1 \pm 0.4\times 10^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$. These values are consistent with high-redshift massive galaxies that have formed most of their stars already. The estimated gas-to-baryon fraction, molecular gas surface density, and SFR surface density have values of $0.43 \pm 0.13$, $350 \pm 200$ M$_{\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$, and $\sim 12 \pm 7~$M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$, respectively. The ratio of star formation rate surface density to molecular gas surface density puts this among the most star-forming systems, similar to other measured SMGs and local ULIRGS.
  • Characterization of the morphology of strongly lensed galaxies is challenging because images of such galaxies are typically highly distorted. Lens modeling and source plane reconstruction is one approach that can provide reasonably undistorted images from which morphological measurements can be made, although at the expense of a highly spatially variable telescope PSF when mapped back to the source plane. Unfortunately, modeling the lensing mass is a time and resource intensive process, and in many cases there are too few constraints to precisely model the lensing mass. If, however, useful morphological measurements could be made in the image plane rather than the source plane, it would bypass this issue and obviate the need for a source reconstruction process for some applications. We examine the use of the Gini coefficient as one such measurement. Because it depends on the cumulative distribution of the light of a galaxy, but not the relative spatial positions, the fact that surface brightness is conserved by lensing means that the Gini coefficient may be well-preserved by strong gravitational lensing. Through simulations, we test the extent to which the Gini coefficient is conserved, including by effects due to PSF convolution and pixelization, to determine whether it is invariant enough under lensing to be used as a measurement of galaxy morphology that can be made in the image plane.
  • We probe the spatial distribution of outflowing gas along four lines of sight separated by up to 6 kpc in a gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxy at z=1.70. Using MgII and FeII emission and absorption as tracers, we find that the clumps of star formation are driving galactic outflows with velocities of -170 to -250 km/sec. The velocities of MgII emission are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocities of the galaxy, consistent with being back-scattered. By contrast, the FeII fluorescent emission lines are either slightly blueshifted or at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Taken together, the velocity structure of the MgII and FeII emission is consistent with arising through scattering in galactic winds. Assuming a thin shell geometry for the out owing gas, the estimated masses carried out by these outfows are large (> 30 - 50 $\rm{M_{\odot} yr^{-1}}$), with mass loading factors several times the star-formation rate. Almost 20% to 50% of the blueshifted absorption probably escapes the gravitational potential of the galaxy. In this galaxy, the outflow is "locally sourced", that is, the properties of the outflow in each line of sight are dominated by the properties of the nearest clump of star formation; the wind is not global to the galaxy. The mass outflow rates and the momentum flux carried out by outflows in individual star forming knots of this object are comparable to that of starburst galaxies in the local Universe.
  • We study a sample of ~10^4 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.2<z<0.8 with masses M_200 > 5x10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun, discovered in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). The depth and excellent image quality of the RCS2 enable us to detect the cluster-mass cross-correlation up to z~0.7. To obtain cluster masses, concentrations and halo biases, we fit a cluster halo model simultaneously to the lensing signal and to the projected density profile of red-sequence cluster members, as the latter provides tight constraints on the cluster miscentring distribution. We parametrise the mass-richness relation as M_200 = A x (N_200/20)^alpha, and find A = (15.0 +- 0.8) x 10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun and alpha = 0.73 +- 0.07 at low redshift (0.2<z<0.35). At intermediate redshift (0.35<z<0.55), we find a higher normalisation, which points at a fractional increase of the richness towards lower redshift caused by the build-up of the red-sequence. The miscentring distribution is well constrained. Only ~30% of our BCGs coincide with the peak of the dark matter distribution. The distribution of the remaining BCGs are modelled with a 2D-Gaussian, whose width increases from 0.2 to 0.4 h_70^-1 Mpc towards higher masses; the ratio of width and r_200 is constant with mass and has an average value of 0.44 +- 0.01. The mass-concentration and mass-bias relation agree fairly well with literature results at low redshift, but have a higher normalisation at higher redshifts, which may be due to selection and projection effects. The concentration of the satellite distribution decreases with mass and is correlated with the concentration of the halo.
  • The sample of cosmological strong lensing systems has been steadily growing in recent years and with the advent of the next generation of space-based survey telescopes, the sample will reach into the thousands. The accuracy of strong lens models relies on robust identification of multiple image families of lensed galaxies. For the most massive lenses, often more than one background galaxy is magnified and multiply-imaged, and even in the cases of only a single lensed source, identification of counter images is not always robust. Recently, we have shown that the Gini coefficient in space-telescope-quality imaging is a measurement of galaxy morphology that is relatively well-preserved by strong gravitational lensing. Here, we investigate its usefulness as a diagnostic for the purposes of image family identification and show that it can remove some of the degeneracies encountered when using color as the sole diagnostic, and can do so without the need for additional observations since whenever a color is available, two Gini coefficients are as well.
  • We measure C III] 1907,1909 A emission lines in eleven gravitationally--lensed star-forming galaxies at z~1.6--3, finding much lower equivalent widths than previously reported for fainter lensed galaxies (Stark et al. 2014). While it is not yet clear what causes some galaxies to be strong C III] emitters, CIII] emission is not a universal property of distant star-forming galaxies. We also examine C III] emission in 46 star-forming galaxies in the local universe, using archival spectra from GHRS, FOS, and STIS on HST, and IUE. Twenty percent of these local galaxies show strong C III] emission, with equivalent widths <-5 A. Three nearby galaxies show C III] emission equivalent widths as large as the most extreme emitters yet observed in the distant universe; all three are Wolf-Rayet galaxies. At all redshifts, strong C III] emission may pick out low-metallicity galaxies experiencing intense bursts of star formation. Such local C III] emitters may shed light on the conditions of star formation in certain extreme high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present the mass distribution at the core of SDSS J1531+3414, a strong-lensing cluster at z=0.335. We find that the mass distribution is well described by two cluster-scale halos with a contribution from cluster-member galaxies. New HST observations of SDSS J1531+3414 reveal a signature of ongoing star formation associated with the two central galaxies at the core of the cluster, in the form of a chain of star forming regions at the center of the cluster. Using the lens model presented here, we place upper limits on the contribution of a possible lensed image to the flux at the center region, and rule out that this emission is coming from a background source.
  • New Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and optical imaging of the strong-lensing galaxy cluster SDSS J1531+3414 (z=0.335) reveals two centrally dominant elliptical galaxies participating in an ongoing major merger. The interaction is at least somewhat rich in cool gas, as the merger is associated with a complex network of nineteen massive superclusters of young stars (or small tidal dwarf galaxies) separated by ~1 kpc in projection from one another, combining to an estimated total star formation rate of ~5 solar masses per year. The resolved young stellar superclusters are threaded by narrow H-alpha, [O II], and blue excess filaments arranged in a network spanning ~27 kpc across the two merging galaxies. This morphology is strongly reminiscent of the well-known "beads on a string" mode of star formation observed on kpc-scales in the arms of spiral galaxies, resonance rings, and in tidal tails between interacting galaxies. Nevertheless, the arrangement of this star formation relative to the nuclei of the two galaxies is difficult to interpret in a dynamical sense, as no known "beads on a string" systems associated with kpc-scale tidal interactions exhibit such lopsided morphology relative to the merger participants. In this Letter we present the images and follow-up spectroscopy, and discuss possible physical interpretations for the unique arrangement of the young stellar clusters. While we suggest that this morphology is likely to be dynamically short-lived, a more quantitative understanding awaits necessary multiwavelength follow-up, including optical integral field spectroscopy, ALMA sub-mm interferometry, and Chandra X-ray imaging.
  • We present a detailed analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) G141 grism spectroscopy for seven star-forming regions of the highly magnified lensed starburst galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609 at z=1.704. We measure the spatial variations of the extinction in RCS0327 through the observed H$\gamma$/H$\beta$ emission line ratios, finding a constant average extinction of $\mathrm{E(B-V)_{gas}}=0.40\pm0.07$. We infer that the star formation is enhanced as a result of an ongoing interaction, with measured star formation rates derived from demagnified, extinction-corrected H$\beta$ line fluxes for the individual star-forming clumps falling >1-2 dex above the star formation sequence. When combining the HST/WFC3 [OIII]$\lambda$5007/H$\beta$ emission line ratio measurements with [NII]/H$\alpha$ line ratios from Wuyts et a. (2014), we find that the majority of the individual star-forming regions fall along the local "normal" abundance sequence. With the first detections of the He I $\lambda$5876 and He II $\lambda$4686 recombination lines in a distant galaxy, we probe the massive-star content of the star-forming regions in RCS0327. The majority of the star-forming regions have a He I $\lambda$5876 to H$\beta$ ratio consistent with the saturated maximum value, which is only possible if they still contain hot O-stars. Two regions have lower ratios, implying that their last burst of new star formation ended ~5 Myr ago. Together, the He I $\lambda$5876 and He II $\lambda$4686 to H$\beta$ line ratios provide indirect evidence for the order in which star formation is stopping in individual star-forming knots of this high redshift merger. We place the spatial variations of the extinction, star formation rate and ionization conditions in the context of the star formation history of RCS0327.
  • The IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS) provides spectra of ~2200 galaxies 0.31<z<0.54 in 5 rich clusters (R <= 5 Mpc) and the field. Infalling, dynamically cold groups with tens of members account for approximately half of the supercluster population, contributing to a growth in cluster mass of ~100% by today. The ICBS spectra distinguish non-starforming (PAS) and poststarburst (PSB) from starforming galaxies -- continuously starforming (CSF) or starbursts, (SBH or SBO), identified by anomalously strong H-delta absorption or [O II] emission. For the infalling cluster groups and similar field groups, we find a correlation between PAS+PSB fraction and group mass, indicating substantial "preprocessing" through quenching mechanisms that can turn starforming galaxies into passive galaxies without the unique environment of rich clusters. SBH + SBO starburst galaxies are common, and they maintain an approximately constant ratio (SBH+SBO)/CSF ~ 25% in all environments -- from field, to groups, to rich clusters. Similarly, while PSB galaxies strongly favor denser environments, PSB/PAS ~ 10-20% for all environments. This result, and their timescale tau < 500 Myr, indicates that starbursts are not signatures of a quenching mechanism that produces the majority of passive galaxies. We suggest instead that starbursts and poststarbursts signal minor mergers and accretions, in starforming and passive galaxies, respectively, and that the principal mechanisms for producing passive systems are (1) early major mergers, for elliptical galaxies, and (2) later, less violent processes -- such as starvation and tidal stripping, for S0 galaxies.
  • We present here a simple model for the star formation history of galaxies that is successful in describing both the star formation rate density over cosmic time, as well as the distribution of specific star formation rates of galaxies at the current epoch, and the evolution of this quantity in galaxy populations to a redshift of z=1. We show first that the cosmic star formation rate density is remarkably well described by a simple log-normal in time. We next postulate that this functional form for the ensemble is also a reasonable description for the star formation histories of individual galaxies. Using the measured specific star formation rates for galaxies at z~0 from Paper III in this series, we then construct a realisation of a universe populated by such galaxies in which the parameters of the log-normal star formation history of each galaxy are adjusted to match the specific star formation rates at z~0 as well as fitting, in ensemble, the cosmic star formation rate density from z=0 to z=8. This model predicts, with striking fidelity, the distribution of specific star formation rates in mass-limited galaxy samples to z=1; this match is not achieved by other models with a different functional form for the star formation histories of individual galaxies, but with the same number of degrees of freedom, suggesting that the log-normal form is well matched to the likely actual histories of individual galaxies. We also impose the specific star formation rate versus mass distributions at higher redshifts from Paper III as constraints on the model, and show that, as previously suggested, some galaxies in the field, particularly low mass galaxies, are quite young at intermediate redshifts. As emphasized in Paper III, starbursts are insufficient ...[abridged]
  • We present the discovery and a detailed multi-wavelength study of a strongly-lensed luminous infrared galaxy at z=0.816. Unlike most known lensed galaxies discovered at optical or near-infrared wavelengths this lensed source is red, r-Ks = 3.9 [AB], which the data presented here demonstrate is due to ongoing dusty star formation. The overall lensing magnification (a factor of 17) facilitates observations from the blue optical through to 500micron, fully capturing both the stellar photospheric emission as well as the re-processed thermal dust emission. We also present optical and near-IR spectroscopy. These extensive data show that this lensed galaxy is in many ways typical of IR-detected sources at z~1, with both a total luminosity and size in accordance with other (albeit much less detailed) measurements in samples of galaxies observed in deep fields with the Spitzer telescope. Its far-infrared spectral energy distribution is well-fit by local templates that are an order of magnitude less luminous than the lensed galaxy; local templates of comparable luminosity are too hot to fit. Its size (D~7kpc) is much larger than local luminous infrared galaxies, but in line with sizes observed for such galaxies at z~1. The star formation appears uniform across this spatial scale. In this source, the luminosity of which is typical of sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background, we find that star formation is spatially extended and well organised, quite unlike the compact merger-driven starbursts which are typical for sources of this luminosity at z~0.
  • We present the results of a weak gravitational lensing analysis to determine whether the stellar mass or the velocity dispersion is more closely related to the amplitude of the lensing signal around galaxies - and hence to the projected distribution of dark matter. The lensing signal on scales smaller than the virial radius corresponds most closely to the lensing velocity dispersion in the case of a singular isothermal profile, but is on larger scales also sensitive to the clustering of the haloes. We select over 4000 lens galaxies at a redshift z<0.2 with concentrated (or bulge-dominated) surface brightness profiles from the ~300 square degree overlap between the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2) and the data release 7 (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We consider both the spectroscopic velocity dispersion and a model velocity dispersion (a combination of the stellar mass, the size and the Sersic index of a galaxy). Comparing the model and spectroscopic velocity dispersion we find that they correlate well for galaxies with concentrated brightness profiles. We find that the stellar mass and the spectroscopic velocity dispersion trace the amplitude of the lensing signal on small scales equally well. The model velocity dispersion, however, does significantly worse. A possible explanation is that the halo properties that determine the small-scale lensing signal - mainly the total mass - also depend on the structural parameters of galaxies, such as the effective radius and Sersic index, but we lack data for a definitive conclusion.
  • We study the shapes of galaxy dark matter haloes by measuring the anisotropy of the weak gravitational lensing signal around galaxies in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). We determine the average shear anisotropy within the virial radius for three lens samples: all galaxies with 19<m_r'<21.5, and the `red' and `blue' samples, whose lensing signals are dominated by massive low-redshift early-type and late-type galaxies, respectively. To study the environmental dependence of the lensing signal, we separate each lens sample into an isolated and clustered part and analyse them separately. We also measure the azimuthal dependence of the distribution of physically associated galaxies around the lens samples. We find that these satellites preferentially reside near the major axis of the lenses, and constrain the angle between the major axis of the lens and the average location of the satellites to <theta>=43.7 deg +/- 0.3 deg for the `all' lenses, <theta>=41.7 deg +/- 0.5 deg for the `red' lenses and <theta>=42.0 deg +/- 1.4 deg for the `blue' lenses. For the `all' sample, we find that the anisotropy of the galaxy-mass cross-correlation function <f-f_45>=0.23 +/- 0.12, providing weak support for the view that the average galaxy is embedded in, and preferentially aligned with, a triaxial dark matter halo. Assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we find that the ratio of the dark matter halo ellipticity and the galaxy ellipticity f_h=e_h/e_g=1.50+1.03-1.01, which for a mean lens ellipticity of 0.25 corresponds to a projected halo ellipticity of e_h=0.38+0.26-0.25 if the halo and the lens are perfectly aligned. For isolated galaxies of the `all' sample, the average shear anisotropy increases to <f-f_45>=0.51+0.26-0.25 and f_h=4.73+2.17-2.05, whilst for clustered galaxies the signal is consistent with zero. (abridged)
  • We present multi-wavelength imaging and near-IR spectroscopy for ten gravitationally lensed galaxies at 0.9<z<2.5 selected from a new, large sample of strong lens systems in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. We derive stellar masses from the rest-frame UV to near-IR spectral energy distributions, star formation rates (SFR) from the dust-corrected Ha flux, and metallicities from the [N II]/Ha flux ratio. We combine the lensed galaxies with a sample of sixty star-forming galaxies from the literature in the same redshift range for which measurements of [N II]/Ha have been published. Due to the lensing magnification, the lensed galaxies probe intrinsic stellar masses that are on average a factor of 11 lower than have been studied so far at these redshifts. They have specific star formation rates that are an order of magnitude higher than seen for main-sequence star-forming galaxies at z~2. We measure an evolution of 0.16+/-0.06 dex in the mass-metallicity relation between z~1.4 and z~2.2. In contrast to previous claims, the redshift evolution is smaller at low stellar masses. We do not see a correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass. The combined sample is in general agreement with the local fundamental relation between metallicity, stellar mass and SFR from Mannucci et al. (2010, 2011). Using the Kennicutt-Schmidt law to infer gas fractions, we investigate the importance of gas inflows and outflows on the shape of the mass-metallicity relation using simple analytical models. This suggests that the Maiolino et al.(2008) calibration of the [N II]/Ha flux ratio is biased high. We conclude that both an absolute metallicity calibration and direct measurements of the gas mass are needed to use the observed mass-metallicity relation to gain insight into the impact of gas flows on the chemical evolution of galaxies.
  • We present new HST/WFC3 imaging data of RCSGA 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z=1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100-pc scale structures in a high-redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially-resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.
  • We present the discovery of an extremely bright and extended lensed source from the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). RCSGA 032727-132609 is spectroscopically confirmed as a giant arc and counter-image of a background galaxy at $z=1.701$, strongly-lensed by the foreground galaxy cluster RCS2 032727-132623 at $z=0.564$. The giant arc extends over $\sim 38$\,\arcsec and has an integrated $g$-band magnitude of 19.15, making it $\sim 20$ times larger and $\sim 4$ times brighter than the prototypical lensed galaxy MS1512-cB58. This is the brightest distant lensed galaxy in the Universe known to date. Its location in the `redshift desert' provides unique opportunities to connect between the large samples of galaxies known at $z\sim3$ and $z\sim1$. We have collected photometry in 9 bands, ranging from $u$ to $K_s$, which densely sample the rest-frame UV and optical light, including the age-sensitive 4000\AA\ break. A lens model is constructed for the system, and results in a robust total magnification of $2.04 \pm 0.16$ for the counter-image; we estimate an average magnification of $17.2 \pm 1.4$ for the giant arc based on the relative physical scales of the arc and counter-image. Fits of single-component spectral energy distribution (SED) models to the photometry result in a moderately young age, $t = 115 \pm 65$\,Myr, small amounts of dust, $E(B-V) \le 0.035$, and an exponentially declining star formation history with \textit{e}-folding time $\tau = 10-100$\,Myr. After correcting for the lensing magnification, we find a stellar mass of $\log(\mathrm{M}/\mathrm{M}_\odot)=10.0 \pm 0.1$. Allowing for episodic star formation, an underlying old burst could contain up to twice the mass inferred from single-component modeling. This stellar mass estimate is consistent with the average stellar mass of a sample of `BM' galaxies ($1.4 < z < 2.0$) studied by Reddy et al. (2006).