• We report results from analyzing the B612 asteroid observation data taken by the sCMOS cameras on board of Planet SkySat-3 using the synthetic tracking technique. The analysis demonstrates the expected sensitivity improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the asteroids from properly stacking up the the short exposure images in post-processing.
  • Accurate astrometry is crucial for determining orbits of near-Earth-asteroids (NEAs) and therefore better tracking them. This paper reports on a demonstration of 10 milliarcsecond-level astrometric precision on a dozen NEAs using the Pomona College 40 inch telescope, at the JPL's Table Mountain Facility. We used the technique of synthetic tracking, in which many short exposure (1 second) images are acquired and then combined in post-processing to track both target asteroid and reference stars across the field of view. This technique avoids the trailing loss and keeps the jitter effects from atmosphere and telescope pointing common between the asteroid and reference stars, resulting in higher astrometric precision than the 100 mas level astrometry from traditional approach of using long exposure images. Treating our synthetic tracking of near-Earth asteroids as a proxy for observations of future spacecraft while they are downlinking data via their high rate optical communication laser beams, our approach shows precision plane-of-sky measurements can be obtained by the optical ground terminals for navigation. We also discuss how future data releases from the Gaia mission can improve our results.
  • Exoplanets mass measurements will be a critical next step to assess the habitability of Earth-like planets: a key aspect of the 2020 vision in the previous decadal survey and also central to NASA's strategic priorities. Precision astrometry delivers measurement of exoplanet masses, allowing discrimination of rocky planets from water worlds and enabling much better modeling of their atmosphere improving species retrieval from spectroscopy. The scientific potential of astrometry will be enormous. The intrinsic astrophysical noise floor set by star spots and stellar surface activity is about a factor of ten more benign for astrometry than for the more established technique of Radial Velocity, widening the discovery region and pushing detection thresholds to lower masses than previously possible. On the instrumental side, precision astrometry is limited by optical field distortion and detector calibration issues. Both technical challenges are now being addressed successfully in the laboratory. However, we have identified the need to continue these technology development efforts to achieve sub-microarcsecond astrometry precision necessary for detection and characterization of Earth-like planets around nearby FGK stars. The international community has realized the importance of astrometry, and various astrometry missions have been proposed and under development, with a few high profile missions now operational. We believe that it is vital for the U.S. scientific community to participate in the development of these new technologies and scientific discoveries. We recommend exploring alternatives to incorporate astrometric capabilities into future exoplanet flagship missions such as HABEX and LUVOIR, substantially increasing the scientific return associated with the expected yield of earth-like planets to be recovered.
  • The Solar Gravitational Lens (SGL) allows for major brightness amplification ($\sim 10^{11}$ at wavelength of $1~\mu$m) and extreme angular resolution ($\sim10^{-10}$ arcsec) within a narrow field of view. A meter-class telescope, with a modest coronagraph to block solar light with 1e-6 suppression placed in the focal area of the SGL, can image an exoplanet at a distance of 30 parsec with few kilometer-scale resolution on its surface. Notably, spectroscopic broadband SNR is $\sim 10^{-6}$ in two weeks of integration time, providing this instrument with incredible remote sensing capabilities. A mission capable of exploiting the remarkable optical properties of the SGL allows for direct high-resolution imaging/spectroscopy of a potentially habitable exoplanet. Such missions could allow exploration of exoplanets relying on the SGL capabilities decades, if not centuries, earlier than possible with other extant technologies.
  • Because of the recent technological advances, the key technologies needed for precision space optical astrometry are now in hand. The Microarcsecond Astrometry Probe (MAP) mission concept is designed to find 1 Earth mass planets at 1AU orbit (scaled to solar luminosity) around the nearest ~90 FGK stars. The MAP payload includes i) a single three-mirror anastigmatic telescope with a 1-m primary mirror and metrology subsystems, and ii) a camera. The camera focal plane consists of 42 detectors, providing a Nyquist sampled FOV of 0.4-deg. Its metrology subsystems ensure that MAP can achieve the 0.8 uas astrometric precision in 1 hr, which is required to detect Earth-like exoplanets in our stellar neighborhood. MAP mission could provide ~10 specific targets for a much larger coronagraphic mission that would measure its spectra. We argue for the development of the space astrometric missions capable of finding Earth-2.0. Given the current technology readiness such missions relying on precision astrometry could be flown in the next decade, perhaps in collaboration with other national space agencies.
  • The remarkable optical properties of the solar gravitational lens (SGL) include major brightness amplification (~1e11 at wavelength of 1 um) and extreme angular resolution (~1e-10 arcsec) in a narrow field of view. A mission to the SGL carrying a modest telescope and coronagraph opens up a possibility for direct megapixel imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of a habitable Earth-like exoplanet at a distance of up to 100 light years. The entire image of such a planet is compressed by the SGL into a region with a diameter of ~1.3 km in the vicinity of the focal line. The telescope, acting as a single pixel detector while traversing this region, can build an image of the exoplanet with kilometer-scale resolution of its surface, enough to see its surface features and signs of habitability. We report here on the results of our initial study of a mission to the deep outer regions of our solar system, with the primary mission objective of conducting direct megapixel high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of a potentially habitable exoplanet by exploiting the remarkable optical properties of the SGL. Our main goal was to investigate what it takes to operate spacecraft at such enormous distances with the needed precision. Specifically, we studied i) how a space mission to the focal region of the SGL may be used to obtain high-resolution direct imaging and spectroscopy of an exoplanet by detecting, tracking, and studying the Einstein ring around the Sun, and ii) how such information could be used to detect signs of life on another planet. Our results indicate that a mission to the SGL with an objective of direct imaging and spectroscopy of a distant exoplanet is challenging, but possible. We composed a list of recommendations on the mission architectures with risk and return tradeoffs and discuss an enabling technology development program.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • We present a new space mission concept that is capable of finding, detecting, and tracking 90% of near-Earth objects (NEO) with H magnitude of $\rm H\leq22$ (i.e., $\sim$140 m in size) that are potentially hazardous to the Earth. The new mission concept relies on two emerging technologies: the technique of synthetic tracking and the new generation of small and capable interplanetary spacecraft. Synthetic tracking is a technique that de-streaks asteroid images by taking multiple fast exposures. With synthetic tracking, an 800 sec observation with a 10 cm telescope in space can detect a moving object with apparent magnitude of 20.5 without losing sensitivity from streaking. We refer to NEOs with a minimum orbit intersection distance of $< 0.002$ au as Earth-grazers (EGs), representing typical albedo distributions. We show that a constellation of six SmallSats (comparable in size to 9U CubeSats) equipped with 10 cm synthetic tracking cameras and evenly-distributed in 1.0 au heliocentric orbit could detect 90% of EGs with $\rm H \leq 22~mag$ in $\sim$3.8 years of observing time. A more advanced constellation of nine 20 cm telescopes could detect 90% of $\rm H=24.2~mag$ (i.e., $\rm \sim 50~m$ in size) EGs in less than 5 years.
  • The Caltech HIgh-speed Multi-color camERA (CHIMERA) is a new instrument that has been developed for use at the prime focus of the Hale 200-inch telescope. Simultaneous optical imaging in two bands is enabled by a dichroic beam splitter centered at 567 nm, with Sloan u' and g' bands available on the blue arm and Sloan r', i' and z_s' bands available on the red arm. Additional narrow-band filters will also become available as required. An Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) detector is employed for both optical channels, each capable of simultaneously delivering sub-electron effective read noise under multiplication gain and frame rates of up to 26 fps full frame (several 1000 fps windowed), over a fully corrected 5 x 5 arcmin field of view. CHIMERA was primarily developed to enable the characterization of the size distribution of sub-km Kuiper Belt Objects via stellar occultation, a science case that motivates the frame-rate, the simultaneous multi-color imaging and the wide field of view of the instrument. In addition, it also has unique capability in the detection of faint near-Earth asteroids and will be used for the monitoring of short duration transient and periodic sources, particularly those discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), and the upcoming Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF).
  • This is a joint summary of the reports from the three Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) in response to the "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" charge given by the Astrophysics Division Director Paul Hertz. This joint executive summary contains points of consensus across all three PAGs. Additional findings specific to the individual PAGs are reported separately in the individual reports. The PAGs concur that all four large mission concepts identified in the white paper as candidates for maturation prior to the 2020 Decadal Survey should be studied in detail. These include the Far-IR Surveyor, the Habitable-Exoplanet Imaging Mission, the UV/Optical/IR Surveyor, and the X-ray Surveyor. This finding is predicated upon assumptions outlined in the white paper and subsequent charge, namely that 1) major development of future large flagship missions under consideration are to follow the implementation phases of JWST and WFIRST; 2) NASA will partner with the European Space Agency on its L3 Gravitational Wave Surveyor; 3) the Inflation Probe be classified as a probe-class mission to be developed according to the 2010 Decadal Survey report. If these key assumptions were to change, this PAG finding would need to be re-evaluated. The PAGs find that there is strong community support for the second phase of this activity - maturation of the four proposed mission concepts via Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDTs). The PAGs find that there is strong consensus that all of the STDTs contain broad and interdisciplinary representation of the science community. Finally, the PAGs find that there is community support for a line of Probe-class missions within the Astrophysics mission portfolio (condensed).
  • We report a detection of a faint near-Earth asteroid (NEA), which was done using our synthetic tracking technique and the CHIMERA instrument on the Palomar 200-inch telescope. This asteroid, with apparent magnitude of 23, was moving at 5.97 degrees per day and was detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15 using 30 sec of data taken at a 16.7 Hz frame rate. The detection was confirmed by a second observation one hour later at the same SNR. The asteroid moved 7 arcseconds in sky over the 30 sec of integration time because of its high proper motion. The synthetic tracking using 16.7 Hz frames avoided the trailing loss suffered by conventional techniques relying on 30-sec exposure, which would degrade the surface brightness of image on CCD to an approximate magnitude of 25. This detection was a result of our 12-hour blind search conducted on the Palomar 200-inch telescope over two nights on September 11 and 12, 2013 scanning twice over six 5.0 deg x 0.043 deg fields. The fact that we detected only one NEA, is consistent with Harris's estimation of the asteroid population distribution, which was used to predict the detection of 1--2 asteroids of absolute magnitude H=28--31 per night. The design of experiment, data analysis method, and algorithms for estimating astrometry are presented. We also demonstrate a milli-arcsecond astrometry using observations of two bright asteroids with the same system on Apr 3, 2013. Strategies of scheduling observations to detect small and fast-moving NEAs with the synthetic tracking technique are discussed.
  • We present an approach that significantly increases the sensitivity for finding and tracking small and fast near Earth asteroids (NEA's). This approach relies on a combined use of a new generation of high-speed cameras which allow short, high frame-rate exposures of moving objects, effectively "freezing" their motion, and a computationally enhanced implementation of the "shift-and-add" data processing technique that helps to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for detection of NEA's. The SNR of a single short exposure of a dim NEA is insufficient to detect it in one frame, but by computationally searching for an appropriate velocity vector, shifting successive frames relative to each other and then co-adding the shifted frames in post-processing, we synthetically create a long-exposure image as if the telescope were tracking the object. This approach, which we call "synthetic tracking," enhances the familiar shift-and-add technique with the ability to do a wide blind search, detect, and track dim and fast-moving NEA's in near real time. We discuss also how synthetic tracking improves the astrometry of fast moving NEA's. We apply this technique to observations of two known asteroids conducted on the Palomar 200-inch telescope and demonstrate improved SNR and 10-fold improvement of astrometric precision over the traditional long exposure approach. In the past 5 years, about 150 NEA's with absolute magnitudes H=28 (~10 m in size) or fainter have been discovered. With an upgraded version of our camera and a field of view of (28 arcmin)^2 on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, synthetic tracking could allow detecting up to 180 such objects per night, including very small NEAs with sizes down to 7 m.
  • The Project 1640 instrument on the 200-inch Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory is a coronagraphic instrument with an integral field spectrograph at the back end, designed to find young, self-luminous planets around nearby stars. To reach the necessary contrast for this, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system corrects for fast atmospheric speckles, while CAL, a phase-shifting interferometer in a Mach-Zehnder configuration, measures the quasistatic components of the complex electric field in the pupil plane following the coronagraphic stop. Two additional sensors measure and control low-order modes. These field measurements may then be combined with a system model and data taken separately using a white-light source internal to the AO system to correct for both phase and amplitude aberrations. Here, we discuss and demonstrate the procedure to maintain a half-plane dark hole in the image plane while the spectrograph is taking data, including initial on-sky performance.
  • Kappa Andromedae is a B9IVn star at 52 pc for which a faint substellar companion separated by 55 AU was recently announced. In this work, we present the first spectrum of the companion, "kappa And B," using the Project 1640 high-contrast imaging platform. Comparison of our low-resolution YJH-band spectra to empirical brown dwarf spectra suggests an early-L spectral type. Fitting synthetic spectra from PHOENIX model atmospheres to our observed spectrum allows us to constrain the effective temperature to ~2000K, as well as place constraints on the companion surface gravity. Further, we use previously reported log(g) and effective temperature measurements of the host star to argue that the kappa And system has an isochronal age of 220 +/- 100 Myr, older than the 30 Myr age reported previously. This interpretation of an older age is corroborated by the photometric properties of kappa And B, which appear to be marginally inconsistent with other 10-100 Myr low-gravity L-dwarfs for the spectral type range we derive. In addition, we use Keck aperture masking interferometry combined with published radial velocity measurements to rule out the existence of any tight stellar companions to kappa And A that might be responsible for the system's overluminosity. Further, we show that luminosity enhancements due to a nearly "pole-on" viewing angle coupled with extremely rapid rotation is unlikely. Kappa And A is thus consistent with its slightly evolved luminosity class (IV) and we propose here that kappa And, with a revised age of 220 +/- 100 Myr, is an interloper to the 30 Myr Columba association with which it was previously associated. The photometric and spectroscopic evidence for kappa And B combined with our re-assesment of the system age implies a substellar companion mass of 50^{+16}_{-13} Jupiter Masses, consistent with a brown dwarf rather than a planetary mass companion.
  • We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL-bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young (<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, were gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determine that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly (~30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 micron CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings are in contrast to previous analyses (e.g. Malbet et al 2010, Benisty et al. 2010) of this complex system which assigned the CO emission to the FU Ori component.
  • We used the Project 1640 near-infrared coronagraph and integral field spectrograph to observe 19 young solar type stars. Five of these stars are known binary stars and we detected the late-type secondaries and were able to measure their JH spectra with a resolution of R\sim30. The reduced, extracted, and calibrated spectra were compared to template spectra from the IRTF spectral library. With this comparison we test the accuracy and consistency of spectral type determination with the low-resolution near-infrared spectra from P1640. Additionally, we determine effective temperature and surface gravity of the companions by fitting synthetic spectra calculated with the PHOENIX model atmosphere code. We also present several new epochs of astrometry of each of the systems. Together these data increase our knowledge and understanding of the stellar make up of these systems. In addition to the astronomical results, the analysis presented helps validate the Project 1640 data reduction and spectral extraction processes and the utility of low-resolution, near-infrared spectra for characterizing late-type companions in multiple systems.
  • (abridged) A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT - the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope, a detector with a large field of view made of small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations (alternative option uses deployable boom). The NEAT primary science program will encompass an astrometric survey of our 200 closest F-, G- and K-type stellar neighbors, with an average of 50 visits. The remaining time might be allocated to improve the characterization of the architecture of selected planetary systems around nearby targets of specific interest (low-mass stars, young stars, etc.) discovered by Gaia, ground-based high-precision radial-velocity surveys.
  • We examine the scientific viability of an imaging mission to find exo-Earths combining the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with a starshade external occulter under a realistic set of astrophysical assumptions. We define an exo-Earth as a planet of 1 to 10 Earth masses orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of a solar-type star. We show that for a survey strategy that relies on a single image to detect an exo-Earth, roughly half of all exo-Earth detections will be false alarms. Here, a false alarm is a mistaken identification of a planet as an exo-Earth. We consider two survey strategies designed to mitigate the false alarm problem. The first is to require that for each potential exo-Earth, a sufficient number of detections are made to measure the orbit. When the orbit is known we can determine if the planet is in the habitable zone. With this strategy, we find that the number of exo-Earths found is on average 0.9, 1.9 and 2.7 for {\eta}_Earth = 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3. Here, {\eta}_Earth is the frequency of exo-Earths orbiting solar-type stars. There is a ~40% probability of finding zero exo-Earths for {\eta}_Earth = 0.1. A second strategy can be employed if a space astrometry mission has identified and measured the orbits and masses of the planets orbiting nearby stars. We find that with prior space-based astrometry from a survey of 60 nearby stars, JWST plus an external occulter can obtain orbital solutions for the majority (70% to 80%) of the exo-Earths orbiting these 60 stars. The exo-Earth yield is approximately five times higher than the yield for the JWST plus occulter mission without prior astrometry. With prior astrometry, the probability that an imaging mission will find zero exo-Earths is reduced to below 1% for the case of {\eta}_Earth = 0.1.
  • The holy grail of exoplanet searches is an exo-Earth, an Earth mass planet in the habitable zone around a nearby star. Mass is the most important parameter of a planet and can only be measured by observing the motion of the star around the planet-star center of mass. A single image of a planet, however, does not provide evidence that the planet is Earth mass or that it is in a habitable zone orbit. The planet's orbit, however, can be measured either by imaging the planet at multiple epochs or by measuring the position of the star at multiple epochs by space-based astrometry. The measurement of an exo-planet's orbit by direct imaging is complicated by a number of factors: (1) the inner working angle (IWA); (2) the apparent brightness of the planet depending on the orbital phase; (3) confusion arising from the presence of multiple planets; and (4) the planet-star contrast. In this paper we address the question: "Can a prior astrometric mission that can identify which stars have Earthlike planets significantly improve the science yield of a mission to image exo-Earths?" We find that the Occulting Ozone Observatory (a small external occulter mission that cannot measure spectra) could confirm the orbits of ~4 to ~5 times as many exo-Earths if an astrometric mission preceded it to identify which stars had such planets. We find that in the case of an internal coronagraph, a survey of the nearest ~60 stars could be done with a telescope of half the size if an astrometric mission had first identified the presence of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone and measured their orbital parameters.
  • We ask if Earth-like planets (terrestrial mass and habitable-zone orbit) can be detected in multi-planet systems, using astrometric and radial velocity observations. We report here the preliminary results of double-blind calculations designed to answer this question.
  • The recent discovery of "dark energy" has challenged Einstein's general theory of relativity as a complete model for our macroscopic universe. From a theoretical view, the challenge is even stronger: general relativity clearly does not extend to the very small, where quantum mechanics holds sway. Fundamental physics models thus require some major revisions. We must explore deeper to both constrain and inspire this needed new physics. In the realm of the solar-system, we can effectively probe for small deviations from the predictions of general relativity: Technology now offers a wide range of opportunities to pursue experiments with accuracies orders of magnitude better than yet achieved. We describe both the relevant theoretical backgrounds and the opportunities for far more accurate solar system experiments.
  • Space astrometry is capable of sub-microarcsecond measurements of star positions. A hundred visits over several years could yield relative astrometric precision of ~0.1 uas, below the astrometric signature (0.3 uas) of a Sun-Earth system at a distance of 10 parsecs. We investigate the impact of starspots on the detectability, via astrometric and radial velocity techniques, of Earthlike planets orbiting Sunlike stars. We find that for nearby stars, although starspot noise imposes severe restrictions on detectability by the radial velocity technique, it does not significantly affect astrometric detectability of habitable zone planets down to below an Earth mass.
  • The primary objective of the Beyond Einstein Advanced Coherent Optical Network (BEACON) mission is a search for new physics beyond general relativity by measuring the curvature of relativistic space-time around Earth. This curvature is characterized by the Eddington parameter \gamma -- the most fundamental relativistic gravity parameter and a direct measure for the presence of new physical interactions. BEACON will achieve an accuracy of 1 x 10^{-9} in measuring the parameter \gamma, thereby going a factor of 30,000 beyond the present best result involving the Cassini spacecraft. Secondary mission objectives include: (i) a direct measurement of the "frame-dragging" and geodetic precessions in the Earth's rotational gravitomagnetic field, to 0.05% and 0.03% accuracy correspondingly, (ii) first measurement of gravity's non-linear effects on light and corresponding 2nd order spatial metric's effects to 0.01% accuracy. BEACON will lead to robust advances in tests of fundamental physics -- this mission could discover a violation or extension of general relativity and/or reveal the presence of an additional long range interaction in physics. BEACON will provide crucial information to separate modern scalar-tensor theories of gravity from general relativity, probe possible ways for gravity quantization, and test modern theories of cosmological evolution.
  • Precision astrometry at microarcsecond accuracy has application to a wide range of astrophysical problems. This paper is a study of the science questions that can be addressed using an instrument that delivers parallaxes at about 4 microarcsec on targets as faint as V = 20, differential accuracy of 0.6 microarcsec on bright targets, and with flexible scheduling. The science topics are drawn primarily from the Team Key Projects, selected in 2000, for the Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest (SIM PlanetQuest). We use the capabilities of this mission to illustrate the importance of the next level of astrometric precision in modern astrophysics. SIM PlanetQuest is currently in the detailed design phase, having completed all of the enabling technologies needed for the flight instrument in 2005. It will be the first space-based long baseline Michelson interferometer designed for precision astrometry. SIM will contribute strongly to many astronomical fields including stellar and galactic astrophysics, planetary systems around nearby stars, and the study of quasar and AGN nuclei. SIM will search for planets with masses as small as an Earth orbiting in the `habitable zone' around the nearest stars using differential astrometry, and could discover many dozen if Earth-like planets are common. It will be the most capable instrument for detecting planets around young stars, thereby providing insights into how planetary systems are born and how they evolve with time. SIM will observe significant numbers of very high- and low-mass stars, providing stellar masses to 1%, the accuracy needed to challenge physical models. Using precision proper motion measurements, SIM will probe the galactic mass distribution and the formation and evolution of the Galactic halo. (abridged)
  • The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) experiment is designed to explore general theory of relativity in the close proximity to the Sun -- the most intense gravitational environment in the solar system. Using independent time-series of highly accurate measurements of the Shapiro time-delay (interplanetary laser ranging accurate to 3 mm at 2 AU) and interferometric astrometry (accurate to 0.01 picoradian), LATOR will measure gravitational deflection of light by the solar gravity with accuracy of 1 part in a billion -- a factor ~30,000 better than currently available. LATOR will perform series of highly-accurate tests in its search for cosmological remnants of scalar field in the solar system. We present science, technology and mission design for the LATOR mission.