• The theory of quasifree quantum stochastic calculus for infinite-dimensional noise is developed within the framework of Hudson-Parthasarathy quantum stochastic calculus. The question of uniqueness for the covariance amplitude with respect to which a given unitary quantum stochastic cocycle is quasifree is addressed, and related to the minimality of the corresponding stochastic dilation. The theory is applied to the identification of a wide class of quantum random walks whose limit processes are driven by quasifree noises.
  • We give a simple and direct treatment of the strong convergence of quantum random walks to quantum stochastic operator cocycles, via the semigroup decomposition of such cocycles. Our approach also delivers convergence of the pointwise product of quantum random walks to the quantum stochastic Trotter product of the respective limit cocycles, thereby revealing the algebraic structure of the limiting procedure. The repeated quantum interactions model is shown to fit nicely into the convergence scheme described.
  • We study the spread of a persuasive new idea through a population of continuous-time random walkers in one dimension. The idea spreads via social gatherings involving groups of nearby walkers who act according to a biased "majority rule": After each gathering, the group takes on the new idea if more than a critical fraction $\frac{1-\varepsilon}{2} < \frac{1}{2}$ of them already hold it; otherwise they all reject it. The boundary of a domain where the new idea has taken hold expands as a traveling wave in the density of new idea holders. Our walkers move by L\'{e}vy motion, and we compute the wave velocity analytically as a function of the frequency of social gatherings and the exponent of the jump distribution. When this distribution is sufficiently heavy tailed, then, counter to intuition, the idea can propagate faster if social gatherings are held less frequently. When jumps are truncated, a critical gathering frequency can emerge which maximizes propagation velocity. We explore our model by simulation, confirming our analytical results.