• The discovery of 1I/2017 U1 ('Oumuamua) has provided the first glimpse of a planetesimal born in another planetary system. This interloper exhibits a variable colour within a range that is broadly consistent with local small bodies such as the P/D type asteroids, Jupiter Trojans, and dynamically excited Kuiper Belt Objects. 1I/'Oumuamua appears unusually elongated in shape, with an axial ratio exceeding 5:1. Rotation period estimates are inconsistent and varied, with reported values between 6.9 and 8.3 hours. Here we analyse all available optical photometry reported to date. No single rotation period can explain the exhibited brightness variations. Rather, 1I/'Oumuamua appears to be in an excited rotational state undergoing Non-Principal Axis (NPA) rotation, or tumbling. A satisfactory solution has apparent lightcurve frequencies of 0.135 and 0.126 hr-1 and implies a longest-to-shortest axis ratio of 5:1, though the available data are insufficient to uniquely constrain the true frequencies and shape. Assuming a body that responds to NPA rotation in a similar manner to Solar System asteroids and comets, the timescale to damp 1I/'Oumuamua's tumbling is at least a billion years. 1I/'Oumuamua was likely set tumbling within its parent planetary system, and will remain tumbling well after it has left ours.
  • We discuss the detection in the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) of two objects in Neptune's distant 9:1 mean motion resonance at semimajor axis $a\approx 130$~au. Both objects are securely resonant on 10 Myr timescales, with one securely in the 9:1 resonance's leading asymmetric libration island and the other in either the symmetric or trailing asymmetric island. These two objects are the largest semimajor axis objects known with secure resonant classifications, and their detection in a carefully characterized survey allows for the first robust population estimate for a resonance beyond 100~au. The detection of these two objects implies a population in the 9:1 resonance of $1.1\times10^4$ objects with $H_r<8.66$ ($D \gtrsim 100$~km) on similar orbits, with 95\% confidence range of $\sim0.4-3\times10^4$. Integrations over 4 Gyr of an ensemble of clones chosen from within the orbit fit uncertainties for these objects reveal that they both have median resonance occupation timescales of $\sim1$~Gyr. These timescales are consistent with the hypothesis that these two objects originate in the scattering population but became transiently stuck to Neptune's 9:1 resonance within the last $\sim1$~Gyr of solar system evolution. Based on simulations of a model of the current scattering population, we estimate the expected resonance sticking population in the 9:1 resonance to be 1000--5000 objects with $H_r<8.66$; this is marginally consistent with the OSSOS 9:1 population estimate. We conclude that resonance sticking is a plausible explanation for the observed 9:1 population, but we also discuss the possibility of a primordial 9:1 population, which would have interesting implications for the Kuiper belt's dynamical history.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is uniquely equipped to search for Solar System bodies due to its unprecedented combination of depth and wide field coverage. Over a ten-year period starting in 2022, LSST will generate the largest catalog of Solar System objects to date. The main goal of the LSST Solar System Science Collaboration (SSSC) is to facilitate the efforts of the planetary community to study the planets and small body populations residing within our Solar System using LSST data. To prepare for future survey cadence decisions and ensure that interesting and novel Solar System science is achievable with LSST, the SSSC has identified and prioritized key Solar System research areas for investigation with LSST in this roadmap. The ranked science priorities highlighted in this living document will inform LSST survey cadence decisions and aid in identifying software tools and pipelines needed to be developed by the planetary community as added value products and resources before the planned start of LSST science operations.
  • The recent discovery by Pan-STARRS1 of 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua), on an unbound and hyperbolic orbit, offers a rare opportunity to explore the planetary formation processes of other stars, and the effect of the interstellar environment on a planetesimal surface. 1I/`Oumuamua's close encounter with the inner Solar System in 2017 October was a unique chance to make observations matching those used to characterize the small-body populations of our own Solar System. We present near-simultaneous g$^\prime$, r$^\prime$, and J photometry and colors of 1I/`Oumuamua from the 8.1-m Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North Telescope, and $gri$ photometry from the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. Our g$^\prime$r$^\prime$J observations are directly comparable to those from the high-precision Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (Col-OSSOS), which offer unique diagnostic information for distinguishing between outer Solar System surfaces. The J-band data also provide the highest signal-to-noise measurements made of 1I/`Oumuamua in the near-infrared. Substantial, correlated near-infrared and optical variability is present, with the same trend in both near-infrared and optical. Our observations are consistent with 1I/`Oumuamua rotating with a double-peaked period of $8.10 \pm 0.42$ hours and being a highly elongated body with an axial ratio of at least 5.3:1, implying that it has significant internal cohesion. The color of the first interstellar planetesimal is at the neutral end of the range of Solar System $g-r$ and $r-J$ solar-reflectance colors: it is like that of some dynamically excited objects in the Kuiper belt and the less-red Jupiter Trojans.
  • We report the discovery of a $H_r = 3.4\pm0.1$ dwarf planet candidate by the Pan-STARRS Outer Solar System Survey. 2010 JO$_{179}$ is red with $(g-r)=0.88 \pm 0.21$, roughly round, and slowly rotating, with a period of $30.6$ hr. Estimates of its albedo imply a diameter of 600--900~km. Observations sampling the span between 2005--2016 provide an exceptionally well-determined orbit for 2010 JO$_{179}$, with a semi-major axis of $78.307\pm0.009$ au, distant orbits known to this precision are rare. We find that 2010 JO$_{179}$ librates securely within the 21:5 mean-motion resonance with Neptune on hundred-megayear time scales, joining the small but growing set of known distant dwarf planets on metastable resonant orbits. These imply a substantial trans-Neptunian population that shifts between stability in high-order resonances, the detached population, and the eroding population of the scattering disk.
  • Several different classes of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) have been identified based on their optical and near-infrared colors. As part of the Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey, we have obtained $g$, $r$, and $z$ band photometry of 26 TNOs using Subaru and Gemini Observatories. Previous color surveys have not utilized $z$ band reflectance, and the inclusion of this band reveals significant surface reflectance variations between sub-populations. The colors of TNOs in $g-r$ and $r-z$ show obvious structure, and appear consistent with the previously measured bi-modality in $g-r$. The distribution of colors of the two dynamically excited surface types can be modeled using the two-component mixing models from Fraser \& Brown (2012). With the combination of $g-r$ and $r-z$, the dynamically excited classes can be separated cleanly into red and neutral surface classes. In $g - r$ and $r - z$, the two dynamically excited surface groups are also clearly distinct from the cold classical TNO surfaces, which are red, with $g-r\gtrsim$0.85 and $r-z\lesssim$0.6, while all dynamically excited objects with similar $g-r$ colors exhibit redder $r-z$ colors. The $z$ band photometry makes it possible for the first time to differentiate the red excited TNO surfaces from the red cold classical TNO surfaces. The discovery of different $r-z$ colors for these cold classical TNOs makes it possible to search for cold classical surfaces in other regions of the Kuiper belt and to completely separate cold classical TNOs from the dynamically excited population, which overlaps in orbital parameter space.
  • The cold classical Kuiper belt objects have low inclinations and eccentricities and are the only Kuiper belt population suspected to have formed in situ. Compared with the dynamically excited populations, which exhibit a broad range of colours and a low binary fraction of ~10% cold classical Kuiper belt objects typically have red optical colours with ~30% of the population found in binary pairs; the origin of these differences remains unclear. We report the detection of a population of blue-coloured, tenuously bound binaries residing among the cold classical Kuiper belt objects. Here we show that widely separated binaries could have survived push-out into the cold classical region during the early phases of Neptune's migration. The blue binaries may be contaminants, originating at ~38 au, and could provide a unique probe of the formative conditions in a region now nearly devoid of objects. The idea that the blue objects, which are predominantly binary, are the products of push-out requires that the planetesimals formed entirely as multiples. Plausible formation routes include planetesimal formation via pebble accretion and subsequent binary production through dynamic friction and binary formation during the collapse of a cloud of solids.
  • We report the discovery of the minor planet 2013 SY$_{99}$, on an exceptionally distant, highly eccentric orbit. With a perihelion of 50.0 au, 2013 SY$_{99}$'s orbit has a semi-major axis of $730 \pm 40$ au, the largest known for a high-perihelion trans-Neptunian object (TNO), well beyond those of (90377) Sedna and 2012 VP$_{113}$. Yet, with an aphelion of $1420 \pm 90$ au, 2013 SY$_{99}$'s orbit is interior to the region influenced by Galactic tides. Such TNOs are not thought to be produced in the current known planetary architecture of the Solar System, and they have informed the recent debate on the existence of a distant giant planet. Photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Gemini North and Subaru indicate 2013 SY$_{99}$ is $\sim 250$ km in diameter and moderately red in colour, similar to other dynamically excited TNOs. Our dynamical simulations show that Neptune's weak influence during 2013 SY$_{99}$'s perihelia encounters drives diffusion in its semi-major axis of hundreds of astronomical units over 4 Gyr. The overall symmetry of random walks in semi-major axis allow diffusion to populate 2013 SY$_{99}$'s orbital parameter space from the 1000-2000 au inner fringe of the Oort cloud. Diffusion affects other known TNOs on orbits with perihelia of 45 to 49 au and semi-major axes beyond 250 au, providing a formation mechanism that implies an extended population, gently cycling into and returning from the inner fringe of the Oort cloud.
  • We report the discovery and orbit of a new dwarf planet candidate, 2015 RR$_{245}$, by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). 2015 RR$_{245}$'s orbit is eccentric ($e=0.586$), with a semi-major axis near 82 au, yielding a perihelion distance of 34 au. 2015 RR$_{245}$ has $g-r = 0.59 \pm 0.11$ and absolute magnitude $H_{r} = 3.6 \pm 0.1$; for an assumed albedo of $p_V = 12$% the object has a diameter of $\sim670$ km. Based on astrometric measurements from OSSOS and Pan-STARRS1, we find that 2015 RR$_{245}$ is securely trapped on ten-Myr timescales in the 9:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune. It is the first TNO identified in this resonance. On hundred-Myr timescales, particles in 2015 RR$_{245}$-like orbits depart and sometimes return to the resonance, indicating that 2015 RR$_{245}$ likely forms part of the long-lived metastable population of distant TNOs that drift between resonance sticking and actively scattering via gravitational encounters with Neptune. The discovery of a 9:2 TNO stresses the role of resonances in the long-term evolution of objects in the scattering disk, and reinforces the view that distant resonances are heavily populated in the current Solar System. This object further motivates detailed modelling of the transient sticking population.
  • We report the discovery, tracking and detection circumstances for 85 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the first 42 deg$^{2}$ of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). This ongoing $r$-band Solar System survey uses the 0.9 deg$^{2}$ field-of-view MegaPrime camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our orbital elements for these TNOs are precise to a fractional semi-major axis uncertainty $<0.1\%$. We achieve this precision in just two oppositions, as compared to the normal 3-5 oppositions, via a dense observing cadence and innovative astrometric technique. These discoveries are free of ephemeris bias, a first for large trans-Neptunian surveys. We also provide the necessary information to enable models of TNO orbital distributions to be tested against our TNO sample. We confirm the existence of a cold "kernel" of objects within the main cold classical Kuiper belt, and infer the existence of an extension of the "stirred" cold classical Kuiper belt to at least several AU beyond the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We find that the population model of Petit et al. (2011) remains a plausible representation of the Kuiper belt. The full survey, to be completed in 2017, will provide an exquisitely characterized sample of important resonant TNO populations, ideal for testing models of giant planet migration during the early history of the Solar System.
  • The first two observational sky "blocks" of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) have significantly increased the number of well-characterized observed trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) in Neptune's mean motion resonances. We describe the 31 securely resonant TNOs detected by OSSOS so far, and we use them to independently verify the resonant population models from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS; Gladman et al. 2012), with which we find broad agreement. We confirm that the 5:2 resonance is more populated than models of the outer Solar System's dynamical history predict; our minimum population estimate shows that the high eccentricity (e>0.35) portion of the resonance is at least as populous as the 2:1 and possibly as populated as the 3:2 resonance. One OSSOS block was well-suited to detecting objects trapped at low libration amplitudes in Neptune's 3:2 resonance, a population of interest in testing the origins of resonant TNOs. We detected three 3:2 objects with libration amplitudes below the cutoff modeled by CFEPS; OSSOS thus offers new constraints on this distribution. The OSSOS detections confirm that the 2:1 resonance has a dynamically colder inclination distribution than either the 3:2 or 5:2 resonances. Using the combined OSSOS and CFEPS 2:1 detections, we constrain the fraction of 2:1 objects in the symmetric mode of libration to be 0.2-0.85; we also constrain the fraction of leading vs. trailing asymmetric librators, which has been theoretically predicted to vary depending on Neptune's migration history, to be 0.05-0.8. Future OSSOS blocks will improve these constraints.
  • Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from reduced signal-to-noise (SNR) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps, and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSF) and trailed point-spread functions (TSF) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with a accuracy of 10 millimags for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve signal-to-noise of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all SNR.