• The optimal resource allocation scheme in a full-duplex Wireless Powered Communication Network (WPCN) composed of one Access Point (AP) and two wireless devices is analyzed and derived. AP operates in a full-duplex mode and is able to broadcast wireless energy signals in downlink and receive information data in uplink simultaneously. On the other hand, each wireless device is assumed to be equipped with Radio-Frequency (RF) energy harvesting circuitry which gathers the energy sent by AP and stores it in a finite capacity battery. The harvested energy is then used for performing uplink data transmission tasks. In the literature, the main focus so far has been on slot-oriented optimization. In this context, all the harvested RF energy in a given slot is also consumed in the same slot. However, this approach leads to sub-optimal solutions because it does not take into account the Channel State Information (CSI) variations over future slots. Differently from most of the prior works, in this paper we focus on the long-term weighted throughput maximization problem. This approach significantly increases the complexity of the optimization problem since it requires to consider both CSI variations over future slots and the evolution of the batteries when deciding the optimal resource allocation. We formulate the problem using the Markov Decision Process (MDP) theory and show how to solve it. Our numerical results emphasize the superiority of our proposed full-duplex WPCN compared to the half-duplex WPCN and reveal interesting insights about the effects of perfect as well as imperfect self-interference cancellation techniques on the network performance.
  • In future high-capacity wireless systems based on mmWave or massive multiple input multiple output (MIMO), the power consumption of receiver Analog to Digital Converters (ADC) is a concern. Although hybrid or analog systems with fewer ADCs have been proposed, fully digital receivers with many lower resolution ADCs (and lower power) may be a more versatile solution. In this paper, focusing on an uplink scenario, we propose to take the optimization of ADC resolution one step further by enabling variable resolutions in the ADCs that sample the signal received at each antenna. This allows to give more bits to the antennas that capture the strongest incoming signal and fewer bits to the antennas that capture little signal energy and mostly noise. Simulation results show that, depending on the unquantized link SNR, a power saving in the order of 20-80% can be obtained by our variable resolution proposal in comparison with a reference fully digital receiver with a fixed low number of bits in all its ADCs.
  • In this work, we study the achievable rate and the energy efficiency of Analog, Hybrid and Digital Combining (AC, HC and DC) for millimeter wave (mmW) receivers. We take into account the power consumption of all receiver components, not just Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC), determine some practical limitations of beamforming in each architecture, and develop performance analysis charts that enable comparison of different receivers simultaneously in terms of two metrics, namely, Spectral Efficiency (SE) and Energy Efficiency (EE). We present a multi-objective utility optimization interpretation to find the best SE-EE weighted trade-off among AC, DC and HC schemes. We consider an Additive Quantization Noise Model (AQNM) to evaluate the achievable rates with low resolution ADCs. Our analysis shows that AC is only advantageous if the channel rank is strictly one, the link has very low SNR, or there is a very stringent low power constraint at the receiver. Otherwise, we show that the usual claim that DC requires the highest power is not universally valid. Rather, either DC or HC alternatively result in the better SE vs EE trade-off depending strongly on the considered power consumption characteristic values for each component of the mmW receiver.
  • The next generation of cellular networks will exploit mmWave frequencies to dramatically increase the network capacity. The communication at such high frequencies, however, requires directionality to compensate the increase in propagation loss. Users and base stations need to align their beams during both initial access and data transmissions, to ensure the maximum gain is reached. The accuracy of the beam selection, and the delay in updating the beam pair or performing initial access, impact the end-to-end performance and the quality of service. In this paper we will present the beam management procedures that 3GPP has included in the NR specifications, focusing on the different operations that can be performed in Standalone (SA) and in Non-Standalone (NSA) deployments. We will also provide a performance comparison among different schemes, along with design insights on the most important parameters related to beam management frameworks.
  • A key enabler for the emerging autonomous and cooperative driving services is high-throughput and reliable Vehicle-to-Network (V2N) communication. In this respect, the millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies hold great promises because of the large available bandwidth which may provide the required link capacity. However, this potential is hindered by the challenging propagation characteristics of high-frequency channels and the dynamic topology of the vehicular scenarios, which affect the reliability of the connection. Moreover, mmWave transmissions typically leverage beamforming gain to compensate for the increased path loss experienced at high frequencies. This, however, requires fine alignment of the transmitting and receiving beams, which may be difficult in vehicular scenarios. Those limitations may undermine the performance of V2N communications and pose new challenges for proper vehicular communication design. In this paper, we study by simulation the practical feasibility of some mmWave-aware strategies to support V2N, in comparison to the traditional LTE connectivity below 6 GHz. The results show that the orchestration among different radios represents a viable solution to enable both high-capacity and robust V2N communications.
  • The communication at mmWave frequencies is a promising enabler for ultra high data rates in the next generation of mobile cellular networks (5G). The harsh propagation environment at such high frequencies, however, demands a dense base station deployment, which may be infeasible because of the unavailability of fiber drops to provide wired backhauling. To address this issue, 3GPP has recently proposed a Study Item on Integrated Access and Backhaul (IAB), i.e., on the possibility of providing the wireless backhaul together with the radio access to the mobile terminals. The design of IAB base stations and networks introduces new research challenges, especially when considering the demanding conditions at mmWave frequencies. In this paper we study different path selection techniques, using a distributed approach, and investigate their performance in terms of hop count and bottleneck Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) using a channel model based on real measurements. We show that there exist solutions that decrease the number of hops without affecting the bottleneck SNR and provide guidelines on the design of IAB path selection policies.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the availability of huge bandwidths to provide unprecedented data rates to next-generation cellular mobile terminals. However, mmWave links are highly susceptible to rapid channel variations and suffer from severe free-space pathloss and atmospheric absorption. To address these challenges, the base stations and the mobile terminals will use highly directional antennas to achieve sufficient link budget in wide area networks. The consequence is the need for precise alignment of the transmitter and the receiver beams, an operation which may increase the latency of establishing a link, and has important implications for control layer procedures, such as initial access, handover and beam tracking. This tutorial provides an overview of recently proposed measurement techniques for beam and mobility management in mmWave cellular networks, and gives insights into the design of accurate, reactive and robust control schemes suitable for a 3GPP NR cellular network. We will illustrate that the best strategy depends on the specific environment in which the nodes are deployed, and give guidelines to inform the optimal choice as a function of the system parameters.
  • The next generations of vehicles will require data transmission rates in the order of terabytes per driving hour, to support advanced automotive services. This unprecedented amount of data to be exchanged goes beyond the capabilities of existing communication technologies for vehicular communication and calls for new solutions. A possible answer to this growing demand for ultra-high transmission speeds can be found in the millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands which, however, are subject to high signal attenuation and challenging propagation characteristics. In particular, mmWave links are typically directional, to benefit from the resulting beamforming gain, and require precise alignment of the transmitter and the receiver beams, an operation which may increase the latency of the communication and lead to deafness due to beam misalignment. In this paper, we propose a stochastic model for characterizing the beam coverage and connectivity probability in mmWave automotive networks. The purpose is to exemplify some of the complex and interesting tradeoffs that have to be considered when designing solutions for vehicular scenarios based on mmWave links. The results show that the performance of the automotive nodes in highly mobile mmWave systems strictly depends on the specific environment in which the vehicles are deployed, and must account for several automotive-specific features such as the nodes speed, the beam alignment periodicity, the base stations density and the antenna geometry.
  • Thanks to the wide availability of bandwidth, the millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies will provide very high data rates to mobile users in next generation 5G cellular networks. However, mmWave links suffer from high isotropic pathloss and blockage from common materials, and are subject to an intermittent channel quality. Therefore, protocols and solutions at different layers in the cellular network and the TCP/IP protocol stack have been proposed and studied. A valuable tool for the end-to-end performance analysis of mmWave cellular networks is the ns-3 mmWave module, which already models in detail the channel, Physical (PHY) and Medium Access Control (MAC) layers, and extends the Long Term Evolution (LTE) stack for the higher layers. In this paper we present an implementation for the ns-3 mmWave module of multi connectivity techniques for 3GPP New Radio (NR) at mmWave frequencies, namely Carrier Aggregation (CA) and Dual Connectivity (DC), and discuss how they can be integrated to increase the functionalities offered by the ns-3 mmWave module.
  • Recent studies indicate the feasibility of full-duplex (FD) bidirectional wireless communications. Due to its potential to increase the capacity, analyzing the performance of a cellular network that contains full-duplex devices is crucial. In this paper, we consider maximizing the weighted sum-rate of downlink and uplink of an FD heterogeneous OFDMA network where each cell consists of an imperfect FD base-station (BS) and a mixture of half-duplex and imperfect full-duplex mobile users. To this end, first, the joint problem of sub-channel assignment and power allocation for a single cell network is investigated. Then, the proposed algorithms are extended for solving the optimization problem for an FD heterogeneous network in which intra-cell and inter-cell interferences are taken into account. Simulation results demonstrate that in a single cell network, when all the users and the BSs are perfect FD nodes, the network throughput could be doubled. Otherwise, the performance improvement is limited by the inter-cell interference, inter-node interference, and self-interference. We also investigate the effect of the percentage of FD users on the network performance in both indoor and outdoor scenarios, and analyze the effect of the self-interference cancellation capability of the FD nodes on the network performance.
  • Large antenna arrays and millimeter-wave (mmWave) frequencies have been attracting growing attention as possible candidates to meet the high requirements of future 5G mobile networks. In view of the large path loss attenuation in these bands, beamforming techniques that create a beam in the direction of the user equipment are essential to perform the transmission. For this purpose, in this paper, we aim at characterizing realistic antenna radiation patterns, motivated by the need to properly capture mmWave propagation behaviors and understand the achievable performance in 5G cellular scenarios. In particular, we highlight how the performance changes with the radiation pattern used. Consequently, we conclude that it is crucial to use an accurate and realistic radiation model for proper performance assessment and system dimensioning.
  • The next generation of multimedia applications will require the telecommunication networks to support a higher bitrate than today, in order to deliver virtual reality and ultra-high quality video content to the users. Most of the video content will be accessed from mobile devices, prompting the provision of very high data rates by next generation (5G) cellular networks. A possible enabler in this regard is communication at mmWave frequencies, given the vast amount of available spectrum that can be allocated to mobile users; however, the harsh propagation environment at such high frequencies makes it hard to provide a reliable service. This paper presents a reliable video streaming architecture for mmWave networks, based on multi connectivity and network coding, and evaluates its performance using a novel combination of the ns-3 mmWave module, real video traces and the network coding library Kodo. The results show that it is indeed possible to reliably stream video over cellular mmWave links, while the combination of multi connectivity and network coding can support high video quality with low latency.
  • Due to its potential for multi-gigabit and low latency wireless links, millimeter wave (mmWave) technology is expected to play a central role in 5th generation cellular systems. While there has been considerable progress in understanding the mmWave physical layer, innovations will be required at all layers of the protocol stack, in both the access and the core network. Discrete-event network simulation is essential for end-to-end, cross-layer research and development. This paper provides a tutorial on a recently developed full-stack mmWave module integrated into the widely used open-source ns--3 simulator. The module includes a number of detailed statistical channel models as well as the ability to incorporate real measurements or ray-tracing data. The Physical (PHY) and Medium Access Control (MAC) layers are modular and highly customizable, making it easy to integrate algorithms or compare Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) numerologies, for example. The module is interfaced with the core network of the ns--3 Long Term Evolution (LTE) module for full-stack simulations of end-to-end connectivity, and advanced architectural features, such as dual-connectivity, are also available. To facilitate the understanding of the module, and verify its correct functioning, we provide several examples that show the performance of the custom mmWave stack as well as custom congestion control algorithms designed specifically for efficient utilization of the mmWave channel.
  • In the last years, the advancements in signal processing and integrated circuits technology allowed several research groups to develop working prototypes of in-band full-duplex wireless systems. The introduction of such a revolutionary concept is promising in terms of increasing network performance, but at the same time poses several new challenges, especially at the MAC layer. Consequently, innovative channel access strategies are needed to exploit the opportunities provided by full-duplex while dealing with the increased complexity derived from its adoption. In this direction, this paper proposes RTS/CTS in the Frequency Domain (RCFD), a MAC layer scheme for full-duplex ad hoc wireless networks, based on the idea of time-frequency channel contention. According to this approach, different OFDM subcarriers are used to coordinate how nodes access the shared medium. The proposed scheme leads to efficient transmission scheduling with the result of avoiding collisions and exploiting full-duplex opportunities. The considerable performance improvements with respect to standard and state-of-the-art MAC protocols for wireless networks are highlighted through both theoretical analysis and network simulations.
  • While spectrum at millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies is less scarce than at traditional frequencies below 6 GHz, still it is not unlimited, in particular if we consider the requirements from other services using the same band and the need to license mmWave bands to multiple mobile operators. Therefore, an efficient spectrum access scheme is critical to harvest the maximum benefit from emerging mmWave technologies. In this paper, we introduce a new hybrid spectrum access scheme for mmWave networks, where data is aggregated through two mmWave carriers with different characteristics. In particular, we consider the case of a hybrid spectrum scheme between a mmWave band with exclusive access and a mmWave band where spectrum is pooled between multiple operators. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study proposing hybrid spectrum access for mmWave networks and providing a quantitative assessment of its benefits. Our results show that this approach provides major advantages with respect to traditional fully licensed or fully unlicensed spectrum access schemes, though further work is needed to achieve a more complete understanding of both technical and non technical implications.
  • Statistical QoS provisioning as an important performance metric in analyzing next generation mobile cellular network, aka 5G, is investigated. In this context, by quantifying the performance in terms of the effective capacity, we introduce a lower bound for the system performance that facilitates an efficient analysis. Based on the proposed lower bound, which is mainly built on a per resource block analysis, we build a basic mathematical framework to analyze effective capacity in an ultra dense heterogeneous cellular network. We use our proposed scalable approach to give insights about the possible enhancements of the statistical QoS experienced by the end users if heterogeneous cellular networks migrate from a conventional half duplex to an imperfect full duplex mode of operation. Numerical results and analysis are provided, where the network is modeled as a Matern point process. The results demonstrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed scheme, especially in large scale wireless systems. Moreover, the minimum level of self interference cancellation for the full duplex system to start outperforming its half duplex counterpart is investigated.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the potential of orders of magnitude increases in capacity for next-generation cellular systems. However, links in mmWave networks are susceptible to blockage and may suffer from rapid variations in quality. Connectivity to multiple cells - at mmWave and/or traditional frequencies - is considered essential for robust communication. One of the challenges in supporting multi-connectivity in mmWaves is the requirement for the network to track the direction of each link in addition to its power and timing. To address this challenge, we implement a novel uplink measurement system that, with the joint help of a local coordinator operating in the legacy band, guarantees continuous monitoring of the channel propagation conditions and allows for the design of efficient control plane applications, including handover, beam tracking and initial access. We show that an uplink-based multi-connectivity approach enables less consuming, better performing, faster and more stable cell selection and scheduling decisions with respect to a traditional downlink-based standalone scheme. Moreover, we argue that the presented framework guarantees (i) efficient tracking of the user in the presence of the channel dynamics expected at mmWaves, and (ii) fast reaction to situations in which the primary propagation path is blocked or not available.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) bands offer the possibility of orders of magnitude greater throughput for fifth generation (5G) cellular systems. However, since mmWave signals are highly susceptible to blockage, channel quality on any one mmWave link can be extremely intermittent. This paper implements a novel dual connectivity protocol that enables mobile user equipment (UE) devices to maintain physical layer connections to 4G and 5G cells simultaneously. A novel uplink control signaling system combined with a local coordinator enables rapid path switching in the event of failures on any one link. This paper provides the first comprehensive end-to-end evaluation of handover mechanisms in mmWave cellular systems. The simulation framework includes detailed measurement-based channel models to realistically capture spatial dynamics of blocking events, as well as the full details of MAC, RLC and transport protocols. Compared to conventional handover mechanisms, the study reveals significant benefits of the proposed method under several metrics.
  • Energy harvesting is a promising technology for the Internet of Things (IoT) towards the goal of self-sustainability of the involved devices. However, the intermittent and unreliable nature of the harvested energy demands an intelligent management of devices' operation in order to ensure a sustained performance of the IoT application. In this work, we address the problem of maximizing the quality of the reported data under the constraints of energy harvesting, energy consumption and communication channel impairments. Specifically, we propose an energy-aware joint source-channel coding scheme that minimizes the expected data distortion, for realistic models of energy generation and of the energy spent by the device to process the data, when the communication is performed over a Rayleigh fading channel. The performance of the scheme is optimized by means of a Markov Decision Process framework.
  • We consider a monitoring application where sensors periodically report data to a common receiver in a time division multiplex fashion. The sensors are constrained by the limited and unpredictable energy availability provided by Energy Harvesting (EH), and by the channel impairments. To maximize the quality of the reported data, the packets transmitted contain newly generated data blocks together with up to $r - 1$ previously unsuccessfully delivered ones, where $r$ is a design parameter; such blocks are compressed, concatenated and encoded with a channel code. The scheme applies lossy compression, such that the fidelity of the individual blocks is traded with the reliability provided by the channel code. We show that the proposed strategy outperforms the one in which retransmissions are not allowed. We also investigate the tradeoff between the value of $r$, the compression and coding rates, under the constraints of the energy availability, and, once $r$ has been decided, use a Markov Decision Process (MDP) to optimize the compression/coding rates. Finally, we implement a reinforcement learning algorithm, through which devices can learn the optimal transmission policy without knowing a priori the statistics of the EH process, and show that it indeed reaches the performance obtained via MDP.
  • Many future wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things are expected to follow a software defined paradigm, where protocol parameters and behaviors will be dynamically tuned as a function of the signal statistics. New protocols will be then injected as a software as certain events occur. For instance, new data compressors could be (re)programmed on-the-fly as the monitored signal type or its statistical properties change. We consider a lossy compression scenario, where the application tolerates some distortion of the gathered signal in return for improved energy efficiency. To reap the full benefits of this paradigm, we discuss an automatic sensor profiling approach where the signal class, and in particular the corresponding rate-distortion curve, is automatically assessed using machine learning tools (namely, support vector machines and neural networks). We show that this curve can be reliably estimated on-the-fly through the computation of a small number (from ten to twenty) of statistical features on time windows of a few hundreds samples.
  • Millimeter wave frequencies will likely be part of the fifth generation of mobile networks and of the 3GPP New Radio (NR) standard. MmWave communication indeed provides a very large bandwidth, thus an increased cell throughput, but how to exploit these resources at the higher layers is still an open research question. A very relevant issue is the high variability of the channel, caused by the blockage from obstacles and the human body. This affects the design of congestion control mechanisms at the transport layer, and state-of-the-art TCP schemes such as TCP CUBIC present suboptimal performance. In this paper, we present a cross layer approach for uplink flows that adjusts the congestion window of TCP at the mobile equipment side using an estimation of the available data rate at the mmWave physical layer, based on the actual resource allocation and on the Signal to Interference plus Noise Ratio. We show that this approach reduces the latency, avoiding to fill the buffers in the cellular stack, and has a quicker recovery time after RTO events than several other TCP congestion control algorithms.
  • The millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies offer the availability of huge bandwidths to provide unprecedented data rates to next-generation cellular mobile terminals. However, directional mmWave links are highly susceptible to rapid channel variations and suffer from severe isotropic pathloss. To face these impairments, this paper addresses the issue of tracking the channel quality of a moving user, an essential procedure for rate prediction, efficient handover and periodic monitoring and adaptation of the user's transmission configuration. The performance of an innovative tracking scheme, in which periodic refinements of the optimal steering direction are alternated to sparser refresh events, are analyzed in terms of both achievable data rate and energy consumption, and compared to those of a state-of-the-art approach. We aim at understanding in which circumstances the proposed scheme is a valid option to provide a robust and efficient mobility management solution. We show that our procedure is particularly well suited to highly variant and unstable mmWave environments.
  • Millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands have been attracting growing attention as a possible candidate for next-generation cellular networks, since the available spectrum is orders of magnitude larger than in current cellular allocations. To precisely design mmWave systems, it is important to examine mmWave interference and SIR coverage under large-scale deployments. For this purpose, we apply an accurate mmWave channel model, derived from experiments, into an analytical framework based on stochastic geometry. In this way we obtain a closed-form SIR coverage probability in large-scale mmWave cellular networks.
  • In this technical report (TR), we describe the mathematical model we developed to carry out a preliminary coverage and connectivity analysis in an automotive communication scenario based on mmWave links. The purpose is to exemplify some of the complex and interesting tradeoffs that have to be considered when designing solutions for mmWave automotive scenarios.