• Accreting black holes show characteristic reflection features in their X-ray spectrum, including an iron K$\alpha$ line, resulting from hard X-ray continuum photons illuminating the accretion disk. The reverberation lag resulting from the path length difference between direct and reflected emission provides a powerful tool to probe the innermost regions around both stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. Here, we present for the first time a reverberation mapping formalism that enables modeling of energy dependent time lags and variability amplitude for a wide range of variability timescales, taking the complete information of the cross-spectrum into account. We use a pivoting power-law model to account for the spectral variability of the continuum that dominates over the reverberation lags for longer time scale variability. We use an analytic approximation to self-consistently account for the non-linear effects caused by this continuum spectral variability, which have been ignored by all previous reverberation studies. We find that ignoring these non-linear effects can bias measurements of the reverberation lags, particularly at low frequencies. Since our model is analytic, we are able to fit simultaneously for a wide range of Fourier frequencies without prohibitive computational expense. We also introduce a formalism of fitting to real and imaginary parts of our cross-spectrum statistic, which naturally avoids some mistakes/inaccuracies previously common in the literature. We perform proof-of-principle fits to Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data of Cygnus X-1.
  • The luminosity of accreting magnetised neutron stars can largely exceed the Eddington value due to appearance of accretion columns. The height of the columns can be comparable to the neutron star radius. The columns produce the X-rays detected by the observer directly and illuminate the stellar surface, which reprocesses the X-rays and causes additional component of the observed flux. The geometry of the column and the illuminated part of the surface determines the radiation beaming. Curved space-time affects the angular flux distribution. We construct a simple model of the beam patterns formed by direct and reflected flux from the column. We take into account the possibility of appearance of accretion columns, whose height is comparable to the neutron star radius. We argue that depending on the compactness of the star the flux from the column can be either strongly amplified due to gravitational lensing, or significantly reduced due to column eclipse by the star. The eclipses of high accretion columns result in specific features in pulse profiles. Their detection can put constraints on the neutron star radius. We speculate that column eclipses are observed in X-ray pulsar V 0332+53, leading us to the conclusion of large neutron star radius in this system ($\sim15\,{\rm km}$ if $M\sim 1.4M_\odot$). We point out that the beam pattern can be strongly affected by scattering in the accretion channel at high luminosity, which has to be taken into account in the models reproducing the pulse profiles.
  • Many statistical properties of X-ray aperiodic variability from accreting compact objects can be explained by the propagating fluctuations model applied to the accretion disc. The mass accretion rate fluctuations originate from variability of viscosity, which arises at every radius and causes local fluctuations of the density. The fluctuations diffuse through the disc and result in local variability of the mass accretion rate, which modulates the X-ray flux from the inner disc in the case of black holes, or from the surface in the case of neutron stars. A key role in the theoretical explanation of fast variability belongs to the description of the diffusion process. The propagation and evolution of the fluctuations is described by the diffusion equation, which can be solved by the method of Green functions. We implement Green functions in order to accurately describe the propagation of fluctuations in the disc. For the first time we consider both forward and backward propagation. We show that (i) viscous diffusion efficiently suppress variability at time scales shorter than the viscous time, (ii) local fluctuations of viscosity affect the mass accretion rate variability both in the inner and the outer parts of accretion disc, (iii) propagating fluctuations give rise not only to hard time lags as previously shown, but also produce soft lags at high frequency similar to those routinely attributed to reprocessing, (iv) deviation from the linear rms-flux relation is predicted for the case of very large initial perturbations. Our model naturally predicts bumpy power spectra.
  • We introduce a new method for analysing the aperiodic variability of coherent pulsations in accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars. Our method involves applying a complex frequency correction to the time-domain light curve, allowing for the aperiodic modulation of the pulse amplitude to be robustly extracted in the frequency domain. We discuss the statistical properties of the resulting modulation spectrum and show how it can be correlated with the non-pulsed emission to determine if the periodic and aperiodic variability are coupled processes. Using this method, we study the 598.88 Hz coherent pulsations of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 as observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton. We demonstrate that our method easily confirms the known coupling between the pulsations and a strong 8 mHz QPO in XMM-Newton observations. Applying our method to the RXTE observations, we further show, for the first time, that the much weaker 20 mHz QPO and its harmonic are also coupled the pulsations. We discuss the implications of this coupling and indicate how it may be used to extract new information on the underlying accretion process.
  • We analyze all available RXTE data on a sample of 13 low mass X-ray binaries with known neutron star spin that are not persistent pulsars. We carefully measure the correlations between the centroid frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We compare these correlations to the prediction of the relativistic precession model (RPM) that, due to frame dragging, a QPO will occur at the Lense-Thirring precession frequency $\nu_{LT}$ of a test particle orbit whose orbital frequency is the upper kHz QPO frequency $\nu_u$. Contrary to the most prominent previous studies, we find two different oscillations in the range predicted for $\nu_{LT}$ that are simultaneously present over a wide range of $\nu_u$. Additionally, one of the low frequency noise components evolves into a (third) QPO in the $\nu_{LT}$ range when $\nu_u$ exceeds 600 Hz. The frequencies of these QPOs all correlate to $\nu_u$ following power laws with indices between 0.4$-$3.3, significantly exceeding the predicted value of 2.0 in 80$\%$ of the cases (at 3 to >20$\sigma$). Also, there is no evidence that the neutron star spin frequency affects any of these three QPO frequencies as would be expected for frame dragging. Finally, the observed QPO frequencies tend to be higher than the $\nu_{LT}$ predicted for reasonable neutron star specific moment of inertia. In the light of recent successes of precession models in black holes, we briefly discuss ways in which such precession can occur in neutron stars at frequencies different from test particle values and consistent with those observed. A precessing torus geometry and other torques than frame dragging may allow precession to produce the observed frequency correlations, but can only explain one of the three QPOs in the $\nu_{LT}$ range.
  • Accreting stellar mass black holes (BHs) routinely exhibit Type-C quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). These are often interpreted as Lense-Thirring precession of the inner accretion flow, a relativistic effect whereby the spin of the BH distorts the surrounding space-time, inducing nodal precession. The best evidence for the precession model is the recent discovery, using a long joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observation of H 1743-322, that the centroid energy of the iron fluorescence line changes systematically with QPO phase. This was interpreted as the inner flow illuminating different azimuths of the accretion disc as it precesses, giving rise to a blue/red shifted iron line when the approaching/receding disc material is illuminated. Here, we develop a physical model for this interpretation, including a self-consistent reflection continuum, and fit this to the same H 1743-322 data. We use an analytic function to parameterise the asymmetric illumination pattern on the disc surface that would result from inner flow precession, and find that the data are well described if two bright patches rotate about the disc surface. This model is preferred to alternatives considering an oscillating disc ionisation parameter, disc inner radius and radial emissivity profile. We find that the reflection fraction varies with QPO phase (3.5 sigma), adding to the now formidable body of evidence that Type-C QPOs are a geometric effect. This is the first example of tomographic QPO modelling, initiating a powerful new technique that utilizes QPOs in order to map the dynamics of accreting material close to the BH.
  • LOFT-P is a concept for a NASA Astrophysics Probe-Class (<$1B) X-ray timing mission, based on the LOFT concept originally proposed to ESAs M3 and M4 calls. LOFT-P requires very large collecting area (>6 m^2, >10x RXTE), high time resolution, good spectral resolution, broad-band spectral coverage (2-30 keV), highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to detect and respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It addresses science questions such as: What is the equation of state of ultra dense matter? What are the effects of strong gravity on matter spiraling into black holes? It would be optimized for sub-millisecond timing to study phenomena at the natural timescales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons and to measure mass and spin of black holes. These measurements are synergistic to imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, addressing much smaller distance scales than are possible without very long baseline X-ray interferometry, and using complementary techniques to address the geometry and dynamics of emission regions. A sky monitor (2-50 keV) acts as a trigger for pointed observations, providing high duty cycle, high time resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with ~20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE All-Sky Monitor, enabling multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies. A probe-class mission concept would employ lightweight collimator technology and large-area solid-state detectors, technologies which have been recently greatly advanced during the ESA M3 study. Given the large community interested in LOFT (>800 supporters, the scientific productivity of this mission is expected to be very high, similar to or greater than RXTE (~2000 refereed publications). We describe the results of a study, recently completed by the MSFC Advanced Concepts Office, that demonstrates that LOFT-P is feasible within a NASA probe-class mission budget.
  • Accreting stellar-mass black holes often show a `Type-C' quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in their X-ray flux, and an iron emission line in their X-ray spectrum. The iron line is generated through continuum photons reflecting off the accretion disk, and its shape is distorted by relativistic motion of the orbiting plasma and the gravitational pull of the black hole. The physical origin of the QPO has long been debated, but is often attributed to Lense-Thirring precession, a General Relativistic effect causing the inner flow to precess as the spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time. This predicts a characteristic rocking of the iron line between red and blue shift as the receding and approaching sides of the disk are respectively illuminated. Here we report on XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the black hole binary H 1743-322 in which the line energy varies systematically over the ~4 s QPO cycle (3.70 sigma significance), as predicted. This provides strong evidence that the QPO is produced by Lense-Thirring precession, constituting the first detection of this effect in the strong gravitation regime. There are however elements of our results harder to explain, with one section of data behaving differently to all the others. Our result enables the future application of tomographic techniques to map the inner regions of black hole accretion disks.
  • One of the primary science goals of the next generation of hard X-ray timing instruments is to determine the equation of state of the matter at supranuclear densities inside neutron stars, by measuring the radius of neutron stars with different masses to accuracies of a few percent. Three main techniques can be used to achieve this goal. The first involves waveform modelling. The flux we observe from a hotspot on the neutron star surface offset from the rotational pole will be modulated by the star's rotation, giving rise to a pulsation. Information about mass and radius is encoded into the pulse profile via relativistic effects, and tight constraints on mass and radius can be obtained. The second technique involves characterising the spin distribution of accreting neutron stars. The most rapidly rotating stars provide a very clean constraint, since the mass-shedding limit is a function of mass and radius. However the overall spin distribution also provides a guide to the torque mechanisms in operation and the moment of inertia, both of which can depend sensitively on dense matter physics. The third technique is to search for quasi-periodic oscillations in X-ray flux associated with global seismic vibrations of magnetars (the most highly magnetized neutron stars), triggered by magnetic explosions. The vibrational frequencies depend on stellar parameters including the dense matter equation of state. We illustrate how these complementary X-ray timing techniques can be used to constrain the dense matter equation of state, and discuss the results that might be expected from a 10m$^2$ instrument. We also discuss how the results from such a facility would compare to other astronomical investigations of neutron star properties. [Modified for arXiv]
  • We study the 205.9 Hz pulsations of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar NGC 6440 X-2 across all outbursts observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over a period of 800 days. We find the pulsations are highly sinusoidal with a fundamental amplitude of 5%-15% rms and a second harmonic that is only occasionally detected with amplitudes of <2% rms. By connecting the orbital phase across multiple outbursts, we obtain an accurate orbital ephemeris for this source and constrain its 57 min orbital period to sub-ms precision. We do not detect an orbital period derivative to an upper limit of $ | \dot{P} | \leq 8 \times 10^{-11}$ s/s. We investigate the possibility of coherently connecting the pulse phase across all observed outbursts, but find that due to the poorly constrained systematic uncertainties introduced by a flux-dependent bias in the pulse phase, multiple statistically acceptable phase-connected timing solutions exist.
  • In this work we have estimated upper and lower limits to the strength of the magnetic dipole moment of all 14 accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). For each source we searched the archival RXTE data for the highest and lowest flux levels with a significant detection of pulsations. We assume these flux levels to correspond to the closest and farthest location of the inner edge of the accretion disk at which channelled accretion takes place. By estimating the accretion rate from the observed luminosity at these two flux levels, we place upper and lower limits on the magnetic dipole moment of the neutron star, using assumptions from standard magnetospheric accretion theory. Finally, we discuss how our field strength estimates can be further improved as more information on these pulsars is obtained.
  • We have studied the aperiodic variability of the 401 Hz accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 using the complete data set collected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over 14 years of observation. The source shows a number of exceptional aperiodic timing phenomena that are observed against a backdrop of timing properties that show consistent trends in all five observed outbursts and closely resemble those of other atoll sources. We performed a detailed study of the enigmatic ~410 Hz QPO, which has only been observed in SAX J1808.4-3658. We find that it appears only when the upper kHz QPO frequency is less than the 401 Hz spin frequency. The difference between the ~410 Hz QPO frequency and the spin frequency follows a similar frequency correlation as the low frequency power spectral components, suggesting that the ~410 Hz QPO is a retrograde beat against the spin frequency of a rotational phenomenon in the 9 Hz range. Comparing this 9 Hz beat feature with the Low-Frequency QPO in SAX J1808.4-3658 and other neutron star sources, we conclude that these two might be part of the same basic phenomenon. We suggest that they might be caused by retrograde precession due to a combination of relativistic, classical and magnetic torques. Additionally we present two new measurements of the lower kHz QPO, allowing us, for the first time, to measure the frequency evolution of the twin kHz QPOs in this source. The twin kHz QPOs are seen to move together over 150 Hz, maintaining a centroid frequency separation of $(0.446 \pm 0.009) \nu_{spin}$.
  • We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ~2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.
  • X-ray radiation from black hole binary (BHB) systems regularly displays quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). In principle, a number of suggested physical mechanisms can reproduce their power spectral properties, thus more powerful diagnostics which preserve phase are required to discern between different models. In this paper, we first find for two Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the BHB GRS 1915+105 that the QPO has a well defined average waveform. That is, the phase difference and amplitude ratios between the first two harmonics vary tightly around a well defined mean. This enables us to reconstruct QPO waveforms in each energy channel, in order to constrain QPO phase-resolved spectra. We fit these phase resolved spectra across 16 phases with a model including Comptonisation and reflection (Gaussian and smeared edge components) to find strong spectral pivoting and a modulation in the iron line equivalent width. The latter indicates the observed reflection fraction is changing throughout the QPO cycle. This points to a geometric QPO origin, although we note that the data presented here do not entirely rule out an alternative interpretation of variable disc ionisation state. We also see tentative hints of modulations in the iron line centroid and width which, although not statistically significant, could result from a non-azimuthally symmetric QPO mechanism.
  • We report the discovery of a 1--5~Hz X-ray flaring phenomenon observed at $>30$~mCrab near peak luminosity in the 2008 and 2011 outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4--3658 in observations with the \textit{Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer}. In each of the two outbursts this high luminosity flaring is seen for $\sim$3 continuous days and switches on and off on a timescale of 1--2~hr. The flaring can be seen directly in the light curve, where it shows sharp spikes of emission at quasi-regular separation. In the power spectrum it produces a broad noise component, which peaks at 1--5~Hz. The total 0.05--10~Hz variability has a fractional rms amplitude of 20\%--45\%, well in excess of the 8\%--12\% rms broad-band noise usually seen in power spectra of SAX J1808.4--3658. We perform a detailed timing analysis of the flaring and study its relation to the 401~Hz pulsations. We find that the pulse amplitude varies proportionally with source flux through all phases of the flaring, indicating that the flaring is likely due to mass density variations created at or outside the magnetospheric boundary. We suggest that this 1--5~Hz flaring is a high mass accretion rate version of the 0.5--2~Hz flaring which is known to occur at low luminosity ($<13$~mCrab), late in the tail of outbursts of SAX J1808.4--3658. We propose the dead-disk instability, previously suggested as the mechanism for the 0.5--2~Hz flaring, as a likely mechanism for the high luminosity flaring reported here.
  • The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al (2013), we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here, we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at 93 Hz and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample, and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterising aperiodic burst variability, and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of time scales, and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.
  • Many statistical properties of the aperiodic variability observed in X-ray radiation from accreting compact objects can be naturally explained by the propagating fluctuations model. This considers variations in mass accretion rate to be stirred up throughout the accretion flow. Variations from the outer regions of the accretion flow will propagate towards the central object, modulating the variations from the inner regions and eventually modulating the radiation, giving rise to the observed linear RMS-flux relation and also Fourier frequency dependent time lags. Previous treatments of this model have relied on computationally intensive Monte Carlo simulations which can only yield an estimate of statistical properties such as the power spectrum. Here, we find exact and analytic expressions for the power spectrum and lag spectrum predicted by the same model. We use our calculation to fit the model of Ingram & Done (2012) to a power spectrum of XTE J1550-564. The result we present here will apply to any treatment of the propagating fluctuations model and thus provides a very powerful tool for future theoretical modelling.
  • We report the discovery of kHz quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) in three Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XTE J1701-407. In one of the observations we detect a kHz QPO with a characteristic frequency of 1153 +/- 5 Hz, while in the other two observations we detect twin QPOs at characteristic frequencies of 740 +/- 5 Hz, 1112 +/- 17 Hz and 740 +/- 11 Hz, 1098 +/- 5 Hz. All detections happen when XTE J1701-407 was in its high intensity soft state, and their single trial significance are in the 3.1-7.5 sigma range. The frequency difference in the centroid frequencies of the twin kHz QPOs (385 +/- 13 Hz) is one of the largest seen till date. The 3-30 keV fractional rms amplitude of the upper kHz QPO varies between ~18 % and ~30 %. XTE J1701-407, with a persistent luminosity close to 1 % of the Eddington limit, is among the small group of low luminosity kHz QPO sources and has the highest rms for the upper kHz QPO detected in any source. The X-ray spectral and variability characteristics of this source indicate its atoll source nature.
  • In order to discern the physical nature of many gamma-ray sources in the sky, we must look not only in spectral and spatial dimensions, but also understand their temporal variability. However, timing analysis of sources with a highly transient nature, such as magnetar bursts, is difficult: standard Fourier techniques developed for long-term variability generally observed, for example, from AGN often do not apply. Here, we present newly developed timing methods applicable to transient events of all kinds, and show their successful application to magnetar bursts observed with Fermi/GBM. Magnetars are a prime subject for timing studies, thanks to the detection of quasi-periodicities in magnetar Giant Flares and their potential to help shed light on the structure of neutron stars. Using state-of-the art statistical techniques, we search for quasi-periodicities (QPOs) in a sample of bursts from Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J0501+4516 observed with Fermi/GBM and provide upper limits for potential QPO detections. Additionally, for the first time, we characterise the broadband variability behaviour of magnetar bursts and highlight how this new information could provide us with another way to probe these mysterious objects.
  • The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and quasi-periodic oscillations at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.
  • After a careful analysis of the instrumental effects on the Poisson noise to demonstrate the feasibility of detailed stochastic variability studies with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), we analyze the variability of the black hole X-ray binary SWIFT J1753.5-0127 in all XRT observations during 2005-2010. We present the evolution of the power spectral components along the outburst in two energy bands: soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV), and in the hard band find results consistent with those from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The advantage of the XRT is that we can also explore the soft band not covered by RXTE. The source has previously been suggested to host an accretion disk extending down to close to the black hole in the low hard state, and to show low frequency variability in the soft band intrinsic to this disk. Our results are consistent with this, with at low intensities stronger low-frequency variability in the soft than in the hard band. From our analysis we are able to present the first measurements of the soft band variability in the peak of the outburst and find it to be less variable than the hard band, especially at high frequencies, opposite to what is seen at low intensity. Both results can be explained within the framework of a simple two emission-region model where the hot flow is more variable in the peak of the outburst and the disk is more variable at low intensities.
  • We present the optical to near-infrared spectrum of MAXI J1659-152, during the onset of its 2010 X-ray outburst. The spectrum was obtained with X-shooter on the ESO - Very Large Telescope (VLT) early in the outburst simultaneous with high quality observations at both shorter and longer wavelengths. At the time of the observations, the source was in the low-hard state. The X-shooter spectrum includes many broad (~2000 km/s), double-peaked emission profiles of H, HeI, HeII, characteristic signatures of a low-mass X-ray binary during outburst. We detect no spectral signatures of the low-mass companion star. The strength of the diffuse interstellar bands results in a lower limit to the total interstellar extinction of Av ~ 0.4 mag. Using the neutral hydrogen column density obtained from the X-ray spectrum we estimate Av ~1 mag. The radial-velocity structure of the interstellar NaI D and CaII H & K lines results in a lower limit to the distance of ~ 4 +/- 1 kpc, consistent with previous estimates. With this distance and Av, the dereddened spectral energy distribution represents a flat disk spectrum. The two subsequent 10 minute X-shooter spectra show significant variability in the red wing of the emission-line profiles, indicating a global change in the density structure of the disk, though on a timescale much shorter than the typical viscous timescale of the disk.
  • Swift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18-140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8 - 25)E38 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.
  • We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~ 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~ 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that Epeak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ~30 keV at F=8.7e-6 erg/cm2/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 e40 erg/s).
  • We explore the use of the bispectrum for understanding quasiperiodic oscillations. The bispectrum is a statistic which probes the relations between the relative phases of the Fourier spectrum at different frequencies. The use of the bispectrum allows us to break the degeneracies between different models for time series which produce identical power spectra. We look at data from several observations of GRS 1915+105 when the source shows strong quasi-periodic oscillations and strong broadband noise components in its power spectrum. We show that, despite strong similarities in the power spectrum, the bispectra can differ strongly. In all cases, there are frequency ranges where the bicoherence, a measure of nonlinearity, is strong for frequencies involving the frequency of the quasi-periodic oscillations, indicating that the quasi-periodic oscillations are coupled to the noise components, rather than being generated independently. We compare the bicoherences from the data to simple models, finding some qualitative similarities.