• We present thermal phase curve measurements for the hot Jupiter WASP-103b observed with Hubble/WFC3 and Spitzer/IRAC. The phase curves have large amplitudes and negligible hotspot offsets, indicative of poor heat redistribution to the nightside. We fit the phase variation with a range of climate maps and find that a spherical harmonics model generally provides the best fit. The phase-resolved spectra are consistent with blackbodies in the WFC3 bandpass, with brightness temperatures ranging from $1880\pm40$ K on the nightside to $2930 \pm 40$ K on the dayside. The dayside spectrum has a significantly higher brightness temperature in the Spitzer bands, likely due to CO emission and a thermal inversion. The inversion is not present on the nightside. We retrieved the atmospheric composition and found the composition is moderately metal-enriched ($\mathrm{[M/H]} = 23^{+29}_{-13}\times$ solar) and the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is below 0.9 at $3\,\sigma$ confidence. In contrast to cooler hot Jupiters, we do not detect spectral features from water, which we attribute to partial H$_2$O dissociation. We compare the phase curves to 3D general circulation models and find magnetic drag effects are needed to match the data. We also compare the WASP-103b spectra to brown dwarfs and young directly imaged companions and find these objects have significantly larger water features, indicating that surface gravity and irradiation environment play an important role in shaping the spectra of hot Jupiters. These results highlight the 3D structure of exoplanet atmospheres and illustrate the importance of phase curve observations for understanding their complex chemistry and physics.
  • We present $H$- and $K_{\rm s}$-bands observations of the LkH$\alpha$ 330 disk with a simultaneous detection of a large gap and spiral-like structures. The morphology of the outer disk ($r\sim$$0\farcs3$) at PA=0--45$^\circ$ and PA=180--290$^\circ$ is affected by a density wave-induced spiral despite the possibility of "cavity-like" structures. We have also investigated the azimuthal profiles at the ring and the outer-disk regions as well as radial profiles in the directions of the spiral-like structures and semi-major axis. Azimuthal analysis shows that the disk has an asymmetric dust distribution. The radial profiles in the major-axis direction (PA=$83^\circ$ and $263^\circ$) suggest that the outer region ($r\geq0\farcs25$) may be influenced by shadows of the inner region of the disk. The spiral-like directions (PA=10$^\circ$ and 230$^\circ$) show different radial profiles, which suggests that the surfaces of the spiral-like structures are highly flared and/or have different dust properties. Finally, a color-map of the disk shows a lack of an outer eastern region in the $H$-band disk, which indicates the presence of a clump-like object in the innermost region ($<1$ au), which occasionally casts a directional shadow onto the disk.
  • We present simultaneous HST WFC3 + Spitzer IRAC variability monitoring for the highly-variable young ($\sim$20 Myr) planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22. Our simultaneous HST + Spitzer observations covered $\sim$2 rotation periods with Spitzer and most of a rotation period with HST. We derive a period of 8.6$\pm$0.1 hours from the Spitzer lightcurve. Combining this period with the measured $v sin i$ for this object, we find an inclination of 56.2$\pm 8.1^{\circ}$. We measure peak-to-trough variability amplitudes of 3.4$\pm$0.1$\%$ for Spitzer Channel 2 and 4.4 - 5.8$\%$ (typical 68$\%$ confidence errors of $\sim$0.3$\%$) in the near-IR bands (1.07-1.67 $\mu$m) covered by the WFC3 G141 prism -- the mid-IR variability amplitude for PSO J318.5-22 one of the highest variability amplitudes measured in the mid-IR for any brown dwarf or planetary mass object. Additionally, we detect phase offsets ranging from 200--210$^{\circ}$ (typical error of $\sim$4$^{\circ}$) between synthesized near-IR lightcurves and the Spitzer mid-IR lightcurve, likely indicating depth-dependent longitudinal atmospheric structure in this atmosphere. The detection of similar variability amplitudes in wide spectral bands relative to absorption features suggests that the driver of the variability may be inhomogeneous clouds (perhaps a patchy haze layer over thick clouds), as opposed to hot spots or compositional inhomogeneities at the top-of-atmosphere level.
  • We developed a simple, physical and self-consistent cloud model for brown dwarfs and young giant exoplanets. We compared different parametrisations for the cloud particle size, by either fixing particle radii, or fixing the mixing efficiency (parameter fsed) or estimating particle radii from simple microphysics. The cloud scheme with simple microphysics appears as the best parametrisation by successfully reproducing the observed photometry and spectra of brown dwarfs and young giant exoplanets. In particular, it reproduces the L-T transition, due to the condensation of silicate and iron clouds below the visible/near-IR photosphere. It also reproduces the reddening observed for low-gravity objects, due to an increase of cloud optical depth for low gravity. In addition, we found that the cloud greenhouse effect shifts chemical equilibriums, increasing the abundances of species stable at high temperature. This effect should significantly contribute to the strong variation of methane abundance at the L-T transition and to the methane depletion observed on young exoplanets. Finally, we predict the existence of a continuum of brown dwarfs and exoplanets for absolute J magnitude=15-18 and J-K color=0-3, due to the evolution of the L-T transition with gravity. This self-consistent model therefore provides a general framework to understand the effects of clouds and appears well-suited for atmospheric retrievals.
  • We present an open-source retrieval code named HELIOS-Retrieval (hereafter HELIOS-R), designed to obtain chemical abundances and temperature-pressure profiles from inverting the measured spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres. In the current implementation, we use an exact solution of the radiative transfer equation, in the pure absorption limit, in our forward model, which allows us to analytically integrate over all of the outgoing rays (instead of performing Gaussian quadrature). Two chemistry models are considered: unconstrained chemistry (where the mixing ratios are treated as free parameters) and equilibrium chemistry (enforced via analytical formulae, where only the elemental abundances are free parameters). The nested sampling algorithm allows us to formally implement Occam's Razor based on a comparison of the Bayesian evidence between models. We perform a retrieval analysis on the measured spectra of the HR 8799b, c, d and e directly imaged exoplanets. Chemical equilibrium is disfavored by the Bayesian evidence for HR 8799b, c and d. We find supersolar C/O, C/H and O/H values for the outer HR 8799b and c exoplanets, while the inner HR 8799d and e exoplanets have substellar C/O, substellar C/H and superstellar O/H values. If these retrieved properties are representative of the bulk compositions of the exoplanets, then they are inconsistent with formation via gravitational instability (without late-time accretion) and consistent with a core accretion scenario in which late-time accretion of ices occurred differently for the inner and outer exoplanets. For HR 8799e, we find that spectroscopy in the K band is crucial for constraining C/O and C/H. HELIOS-R is publicly available as part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP; www.exoclime.org).
  • DH Tau is a young ($\sim$1 Myr) classical T Tauri star. It is one of the few young PMS stars known to be associated with a planetary mass companion, DH Tau b, orbiting at large separation and detected by direct imaging. DH Tau b is thought to be accreting based on copious H${\alpha}$ emission and exhibits variable Paschen Beta emission. NOEMA observations at 230 GHz allow us to place constraints on the disk dust mass for both DH Tau b and the primary in a regime where the disks will appear optically thin. We estimate a disk dust mass for the primary, DH Tau A of $17.2\pm1.7\,M_{\oplus}$, which gives a disk-to-star mass ratio of 0.014 (assuming the usual Gas-to-Dust mass ratio of 100 in the disk). We find a conservative disk dust mass upper limit of 0.42$M_{\oplus}$ for DH Tau b, assuming that the disk temperature is dominated by irradiation from DH Tau b itself. Given the environment of the circumplanetary disk, variable illumination from the primary or the equilibrium temperature of the surrounding cloud would lead to even lower disk mass estimates. A MCFOST radiative transfer model including heating of the circumplanetary disk by DH Tau b and DH Tau A suggests that a mass averaged disk temperature of 22 K is more realistic, resulting in a dust disk mass upper limit of 0.09$M_{\oplus}$ for DH Tau b. We place DH Tau b in context with similar objects and discuss the consequences for planet formation models.
  • OTS44 is one of only four free-floating planets known to have a disk. We have previously shown that it is the coolest and least massive known free-floating planet ($\sim$12 M$_{\rm Jup}$) with a substantial disk that is actively accreting. We have obtained Band 6 (233 GHz) ALMA continuum data of this very young disk-bearing object. The data shows a clear unresolved detection of the source. We obtained disk-mass estimates via empirical correlations derived for young, higher-mass, central (substellar) objects. The range of values obtained are between 0.07 and 0.63 M$_{\oplus}$ (dust masses). We compare the properties of this unique disk with those recently reported around higher-mass (brown dwarfs) young objects in order to infer constraints on its mechanism of formation. While extreme assumptions on dust temperature yield disk-mass values that could slightly diverge from the general trends found for more massive brown dwarfs, a range of sensible values provide disk masses compatible with a unique scaling relation between $M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{*}$ through the substellar domain down to planetary masses.
  • HR4796A is surrounded by a debris disc, observed in scattered light as an inclined ring. Past observations raised several questions. First, a strong brightness asymmetry detected in polarized reflected light recently challenged our understanding of scattering by the dust particles in this system. Secondly, the morphology of the ring strongly suggests the presence of planets, although no planets have been detected to date. We obtained high-angular resolution coronagraphic images of the circumstellar environment around HR4796A with VLT/SPHERE during the commissioning of the instrument in May 2014 and during guaranteed-time observations in February 2015. The observations reveal for the first time the entire ring of dust, including the semi-minor axis that was previously hidden either behind the coronagraphic spot or in the speckle noise. We determine empirically the scattering phase function of the dust in the H band from 13.6deg to 166.6deg. It shows a prominent peak of forward scattering, never detected before, for scattering angles below 30deg. We analyse the reflectance spectra of the disc from the 0.95 to 1.6 microns, confirming the red colour of the dust, and derive detection limits on the presence of planetary mass objects. We confirm which side of the disc is inclined towards the Earth. The analysis of the phase function suggests that the dust population is dominated by particles much larger than the observation wavelength, of about 20 microns. Compact Mie grains of this size are incompatible with the spectral energy distribution of the disc, however the observed rise in scattering efficiency beyond 50deg points towards aggregates which could reconcile both observables. We do not detect companions orbiting the star but our high-contrast observations provide the most stringent constraints yet on the presence of planets responsible for the morphology of the dust.
  • The solar galactic neighbourhood contains a number of young co-moving associations of stars (so-called `young moving groups') with ages of ~10--150 Myr, which are prime targets for a range of scientific studies, including direct imaging planet searches. The late-type stellar population of such groups still remain in their pre-main sequence phase, and are thus well suited for purposes such as isochronal dating. Close binaries are particularly useful in this regard, since they allow for a model-independent dynamical mass determination. Here we present a dedicated effort to identify new close binaries in nearby young moving groups, through high-resolution imaging with the AstraLux Sur Lucky Imaging camera. We surveyed 181 targets, resulting in the detection of 61 companions or candidates, of which 38 are new discoveries. An interesting example of such a case is 2MASS J00302572-6236015 AB, which is a high-probability member of the Tucana-Horologium moving group, and has an estimated orbital period of less than 10 years. Among the previously known objects is a serendipitous detection of the deuterium burning boundary circumbinary companion 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b in the z'-band, thereby extending the spectral coverage for this object down to near-visible wavelengths.
  • Uncovering the ingredients and the architecture of planetary systems is a very active field of research that has fuelled many new theories on giant planet formation, migration, composition, and interaction with the circumstellar environment. We aim at discovering and studying new such systems, to further expand our knowledge of how low-mass companions form and evolve. We obtained high-contrast H-band images of the circumstellar environment of the F5V star HD206893, known to host a debris disc never detected in scattered light. These observations are part of the SPHERE High Angular Resolution Debris Disc Survey (SHARDDS) using the InfraRed Dual-band Imager and Spectrograph (IRDIS) installed on VLT/SPHERE. We report the detection of a source with a contrast of 3.6x10^{-5} in the H-band, orbiting at a projected separation of 270 milliarcsecond or 10 au, corresponding to a mass in the range 24 to 73 Mjup for an age of the system in the range 0.2 to 2 Gyr. The detection was confirmed ten months later with VLT/NaCo, ruling out a background object with no proper motion. A faint extended emission compatible with the disc scattered light signal is also observed. The detection of a low-mass companion inside a massive debris disc makes this system an analog of other young planetary systems such as beta Pictoris, HR8799 or HD95086 and requires now further characterisation of both components to understand their interactions.
  • Context: For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity survey of a sample of 373 G and K giant stars using the Hamilton \'Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar+stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. In order to discriminate between RV variations due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to further characterize the system, we obtain high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the likely discovery of a giant planet with a mass of $m_{p}~\sin i=6.92_{-0.24}^{+0.18}~M_{Jup}$ orbiting at $a_{p}=1.0860_{-0.0007}^{+0.0006}$ au from the giant star HD 59686 A. Besides the planetary signal, we discover an eccentric ($e_{B}=0.729_{-0.003}^{+0.004}$) binary companion with a mass of $m_{B}~\sin i=0.5296_{-0.0008}^{+0.0011}~M_{Sun}$ orbiting at a semi-major axis of just $a_{B}=13.56_{-0.14}^{+0.18}$ au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime should be seriously considered in order to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet.
  • The recent development of brand new observational techniques and theoretical models have greatly advanced the exoplanet research field. Despite significant achievements, which have allowed the detection of thousands extrasolar systems, a comprehensive understanding of planetary formation and evolution mechanisms is still desired. One relevant limitation is given by the accuracy in the measurements of planet-host star ages. The star GJ 504 has been found to host a substellar companion whose nature is strongly debated. There has been a recent difference of opinion in the literature owing to the uncertainty on the age of the system: a young age of $\sim$ 160 Myr would imply a giant planet as a companion, but a recent revision pointing to a solar age ($\sim$ 4 Gyr) instead suggests a brown dwarf. With the aim of shedding light on this debated topic, we have carried out a high-resolution spectroscopic study of GJ 504 to derive stellar parameters, metallicity, and abundances of both light and heavy elements, providing a full chemical characterisation. The main objective is to infer clues on the evolutionary stage (hence the age) of this system. We performed a strictly differential (line-by-line) analysis of GJ 504 with respect to two reference stars, that is the planet-host dwarf $\iota$ Hor and the subgiant HIP 84827. The former is crucial in this context because its stellar parameters (hence the evolutionary stage) is well constrained from asteroseismic observations. Regardless of the zero point offsets, our differential approach allows us to put tight constraints on the age of GJ 504 with respect to $\iota$ Hor, thereby minimising the internal uncertainties. We found that the surface gravity of GJ 504 is 0.2 $\pm$ 0.07 dex lower than that of the main-sequence star $\iota$ Hor, suggesting a past turn-off evolution[...]
  • Time-resolved photometry is an important new probe of the physics of condensate clouds in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Extreme adaptive optics systems can directly image planets, but precise brightness measurements are challenging. We present VLT/SPHERE high-contrast, time-resolved broad H-band near-infrared photometry for four exoplanets in the HR 8799 system, sampling changes from night to night over five nights with relatively short integrations. The photospheres of these four planets are often modeled by patchy clouds and may show large-amplitude rotational brightness modulations. Our observations provide high-quality images of the system. We present a detailed performance analysis of different data analysis approaches to accurately measure the relative brightnesses of the four exoplanets. We explore the information in satellite spots and demonstrate their use as a proxy for image quality. While the brightness variations of the satellite spots are strongly correlated, we also identify a second-order anti-correlation pattern between the different spots. Our study finds that PCA-based KLIP reduction with satellite spot-modulated artificial planet-injection based photometry (SMAP) leads to a significant (~3x) gain in photometric accuracy over standard aperture-based photometry and reaches 0.1 mag per point accuracy for our dataset, the signal-to-noise of which is limited by small field rotation. Relative planet-to-planet photometry can be compared be- tween nights, enabling observations spanning multiple nights to probe variability. Recent high-quality relative H-band photometry of the b-c planet pair agree to about 1%.
  • We image with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity disk features that could be potential signs of planet-disk interaction. Two companion candidates have been claimed in the disk around the young Herbig Ae/Be star HD100546. Thus, this object serves as an excellent target for our investigation of the natal environment of giant planets. We exploit the power of extreme adaptive optics operating in conjunction with the new high-contrast imager SPHERE to image HD100546 in scattered light. We obtain the first polarized light observations of this source in the visible (with resolution as fine as 2 AU) and new H and K band total intensity images that we analyze with the Pynpoint package. The disk shows a complex azimuthal morphology, where multiple scattering of photons most likely plays an important role. High brightness contrasts and arm-like structures are ubiquitous in the disk. A double-wing structure (partly due to ADI processing) resembles a morphology newly observed in inclined disks. Given the cavity size in the visible (11 AU), the CO emission associated to the planet candidate 'c' might arise from within the circumstellar disk. We find an extended emission in the K band at the expected location of 'b'. The surrounding large-scale region is the brightest in scattered light. There is no sign of any disk gap associated to 'b'.
  • The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (<4 R_earth) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the re-purposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby, field age, M dwarfs K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 93 +/- 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its 14.5665 d period planet and estimate a radius of 2.67^+0.46_-0.42 R_earth. K2-9 is an M2.5 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 110 +/- 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al. 2015; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25^+0.53_-0.96 R_earth planet with a 18.4498 d period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given the measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures <500 K. K2-9b may receive approximately Earth-like insolation. However, its host star exhibits strong GALEX UV emission which could affect any atmosphere it harbors. K2-26b and K2-9b are representatives of a poorly studied class of small planets with cool temperatures that have radii intermediate to Earth and Neptune. Future study of these systems can provide key insight into trends in bulk composition and atmospheric properties at the transition from silicate dominated to volatile rich bodies.
  • Imaging companions to main-sequence stars often allows to detect a projected orbital motion. MCMC has become very popular in for fitting their orbits. Some of these companions appear to move on very eccentric, possibly unbound orbits. This is the case for the exoplanet Fomalhaut b and the brown dwarf companion PZ Tel B. For such orbits, standard MCMC codes assuming only bound orbits may be inappropriate. We develop a new MCMC implementation able to handle bound and unbound orbits as well in a continuous manner, and we apply it to the cases of Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. This code is based on universal Keplerian variables and Stumpff functions formalism. We present two versions of this code, the second one using a different set of angular variables designed to avoid degeneracies arising when the projected orbital motion is quasi-radial, as it is the case for PZ Tel B. We also present additional observations of PZ Tel B. The code is applied to Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. Concerning Fomalhaut b, we confirm previous results, but we show that open orbital solutions are also possible. The eccentricity distribution nevertheless peaks around ~0.9 in the bound regime. We present a first successful orbital fit of PZ Tel B, showing in particular that the eccentricity distribution presents a sharp peak very close to e=1, meaning a quasi-parabolic orbit. It was recently suggested that unseen inner companions may lead orbital fitting algorithms to artificially give high eccentricities. We show that this caveat is unlikely to apply to Fomalhaut b. Concerning PZ Tel B, an inner ~12 MJup companion would mimic a e=1 orbit despite a real eccentricity around 0.7, but a dynamical analysis reveals that such a system would not be stable. We conclude that our orbital fit is robust.
  • As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly-imaged exoplanets were all L-type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. (2013) announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ~500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (~1000 K) and our own Solar System's Jupiter (~130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 microns), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 microns) as part of the LEECH exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry to a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well-fit by models with the following parameters: T_eff=544+/-10 K, g<600 m/s^2, [M/H]=0.60+/-0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f_sed=2-5, R=0.96+/-0.07 R_Jup, and log(L)=-6.13+/-0.03 L_Sun, implying a hot start mass of 3-30 M_jup for a conservative age range of 0.1-6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a super-stellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with non-stellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.
  • As part of our ongoing NTT SoFI survey for variability in young free-floating planets and low mass brown dwarfs, we detect significant variability in the young, free-floating planetary mass object PSO J318.5-22, likely due to rotational modulation of inhomogeneous cloud cover. A member of the 23$\pm$3 Myr $\beta$ Pic moving group, PSO J318.5-22 has T$_\mathrm{eff}$ = 1160$^{+30}_{-40}$ K and a mass estimate of 8.3$\pm$0.5 M$_{Jup}$ for a 23$\pm$3 Myr age. PSO J318.5-22 is intermediate in mass between 51 Eri b and $\beta$ Pic b, the two known exoplanet companions in the $\beta$ Pic moving group. With variability amplitudes from 7-10$\%$ in J$_{S}$ at two separate epochs over 3-5 hour observations, we constrain the rotational period of this object to $>$5 hours. In K$_{S}$, we marginally detect a variability trend of up to 3$\%$ over a 3 hour observation. This is the first detection of weather on an extrasolar planetary mass object. Among L dwarfs surveyed at high-photometric precision ($<$3$\%$) this is the highest amplitude variability detection. Given the low surface gravity of this object, the high amplitude preliminarily suggests that such objects may be more variable than their high mass counterparts, although observations of a larger sample is necessary to confirm this. Measuring similar variability for directly imaged planetary companions is possible with instruments such as SPHERE and GPI and will provide important constraints on formation. Measuring variability at multiple wavelengths can help constrain cloud structure.
  • We present high-resolution Large Binocular Telescope LBTI/LMIRcam images of the spectroscopic and astrometric binary NO UMa obtained as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. Our H, K$_s$, and L'-band observations resolve the system at angular separations <0.09". The components exhibit significant orbital motion over a span of ~7 months. We combine our imaging data with archival images, published speckle interferometry measurements, and existing spectroscopic velocity data to solve the full orbital solution and estimate component masses. The masses of the K2.0$\pm$0.5 primary and K6.5$\pm$0.5 secondary are 0.83$\pm$0.02 M$_{\odot}$ and 0.64$\pm$0.02 M$_{\odot}$, respectively. We also derive a system distance of d = 25.87$\pm$0.02 pc and revise the Galactic kinematics of NO UMa. Our revised Galactic kinematics confirm NO UMa as a nuclear member of the ~500 Myr old Ursa Major moving group and it is thus a mass and age benchmark. We compare the masses of the NO UMa binary components to those predicted by five sets of stellar evolution models at the age of the Ursa Major group. We find excellent agreement between our measured masses and model predictions with little systematic scatter between the models. NO UMa joins the short list of nearby, bright, late-type binaries having known ages and fully characterized orbits.
  • Orbital monitoring of M-type binaries is essential for constraining their fundamental properties. This is particularly useful in young systems, where the extended pre-main sequence evolution can allow for precise isochronal dating. Here, we present the continued astrometric monitoring of the more than 200 binaries of the AstraLux Large Multiplicity Survey, building both on our previous work, archival data, and new astrometric data spanning the range of 2010-2012. The sample is very young overall -- all included stars have known X-ray emission, and a significant fraction (18%) of them have recently also been identified as members of young moving groups in the Solar neighborhood. We identify ~30 targets that both have indications of being young and for which an orbit either has been closed or appears possible to close in a reasonable timeframe (a few years to a few decades). One of these cases, GJ 4326, is however identified as probably being substantially older than has been implied from its apparent moving group membership, based on astrometric and isochronal arguments. With further astrometric monitoring, these targets will provide a set of empirical isochrones, against which theoretical isochrones can be calibrated, and which can be used to evaluate the precise ages of nearby young moving groups.
  • We report the detection of a faint pointlike feature possibly related to ongoing planet-formation in the disk of the transition disk star HD 169142. The pointlike feature has a $\Delta$mag(L)$\sim$6.4, at a separation of $\sim$0.11" and PA$\sim$0$^{\circ}$. Given its lack of an H or K$_{S}$ counterpart despite its relative brightness, this candidate cannot be explained by purely photospheric emission and must be a disk feature heated by an as yet unknown source. Its extremely red colors make it highly unlikely to be a background object, but future multi-wavelength followup is necessary for confirmation and characterization of this feature.
  • In Spring 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its $\sim$130-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) atop Mt Graham, Arizona. This survey benefits from the many technological achievements of the LBT, including two 8.4-meter mirrors on a single fixed mount, dual adaptive secondary mirrors for high Strehl performance, and a cold beam combiner to dramatically reduce the telescope's overall background emissivity. LEECH neatly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars at L' (3.8 $\mu$m), as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.4 $\mu$m) of other surveys. This portion of the spectrum offers deep mass sensitivity, especially around nearby adolescent ($\sim$0.1-1 Gyr) stars. LEECH's contrast is competitive with other extreme adaptive optics systems, while providing an alternative survey strategy. Additionally, LEECH is characterizing known exoplanetary systems with observations from 3-5$\mu$m in preparation for JWST.
  • HD 95086 is an intermediate-mass debris-disk-bearing star. VLT/NaCo $3.8 \mu m$ observations revealed it hosts a $5\pm2 \mathrm{M}_{Jup}$ companion (HD 95086 b) at $\simeq 56$ AU. Follow-up observations at 1.66 and 2.18 $\mu m$ yielded a null detection, suggesting extremely red colors for the planet and the need for deeper direct-imaging data. In this Letter, we report H- ($1.7 \mu m$) and $\mathrm{K}_1$- ($2.05 \mu m$) band detections of HD 95086 b from Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) commissioning observations taken by the GPI team. The planet position in both spectral channels is consistent with the NaCo measurements and we confirm it to be comoving. Our photometry yields colors of H-L'= $3.6\pm 1.0$ mag and K$_1$-L'=$2.4\pm 0.7$ mag, consistent with previously reported 5-$\sigma$ upper limits in H and Ks. The photometry of HD 95086 b best matches that of 2M 1207 b and HR 8799 cde. Comparing its spectral energy distribution with the BT-SETTL and LESIA planet atmospheric models yields T$_{\mathrm{eff}}\sim$600-1500 K and log g$\sim$2.1-4.5. Hot-start evolutionary models yield M=$5\pm2$ M$_{Jup}$. Warm-start models reproduce the combined absolute fluxes of the object for M=4-14 M$_{Jup}$ for a wide range of plausible initial conditions (S$_{init}$=8-13 k$_{B}$/baryon). The color-magnitude diagram location of HD 95086 b and its estimated T$_{\mathrm{eff}}$ and log g suggest that the planet is a peculiar L-T transition object with an enhanced amount of photospheric dust.
  • We present a radiative-convective equilibrium model for young giant exoplanets. Model predictions are compared with the existing photometric measurements of planet beta Pictoris b in the J, H, Ks, L', NB 4.05, M' bands . This model will be used to interpret future photometric and spectroscopic observations of exoplanets with SPHERE, mounted at the VLT with a first light expected mid-2014.
  • In February 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its 100-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope atop Mount Graham in Arizona. LEECH nearly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars in L' band (3.8 microns) as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.3 microns). This part of the spectrum offers deeper mass sensitivity for intermediate age (several hundred Myr-old) systems, since their Jovian-mass planets radiate predominantly in the mid-infrared. In this proceedings, we present the science goals for LEECH and a preliminary contrast curve from some early data.