• Directed energy for planetary defense is now a viable option and is superior in many ways to other proposed technologies, being able to defend the Earth against all known threats. This paper presents basic ideas behind a directed energy planetary defense system that utilizes laser ablation of an asteroid to impart a deflecting force on the target. A conceptual philosophy called DE-STAR, which stands for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation, is an orbiting stand-off system, which has been described in other papers. This paper describes a smaller, stand-on system known as DE-STARLITE as a reduced-scale version of DE-STAR. Both share the same basic heritage of a directed energy array that heats the surface of the target to the point of high surface vapor pressure that causes significant mass ejection thus forming an ejection plume of material from the target that acts as a rocket to deflect the object. This is generally classified as laser ablation. DE-STARLITE uses conventional propellant for launch to LEO and then ion engines to propel the spacecraft from LEO to the near-Earth asteroid (NEA). During laser ablation, the asteroid itself provides the propellant source material; thus a very modest spacecraft can deflect an asteroid much larger than would be possible with a system of similar mission mass using ion beam deflection (IBD) or a gravity tractor. DE- STARLITE is capable of deflecting an Apophis-class (325 m diameter) asteroid with a 1- to 15-year targeting time (laser on time) depending on the system design. The mission fits within the rough mission parameters of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) program in terms of mass and size. DE-STARLITE also has much greater capability for planetary defense than current proposals and is readily scalable to match the threat. It can deflect all known threats with sufficient warning.
  • We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an H${\alpha}$ map, a de-striped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 $\mu$m IRAS/DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST $\sim10^\circ$ declination band into 24 one-hour (RA) wide sectors with $\sim7900$ pixels each, where we calculate: (a) the linear correlation coefficient between the anisotropy maps and the templates; (b) the coupling constants between the specific intensity units of the templates and the antenna temperature at the BEAST frequencies and (c) the individual foreground contributions to the BEAST anisotropy maps. The peak sector contributions of the contaminants in the Ka-band are of 56.5% free-free with a coupling constant of $8.3\pm0.4$ $\mu$K/R, and 67.4% dust with $45.0\pm2.0$ $\mu$K/(MJy/sr). In the Q-band the corresponding values are of 64.4% free-free with $4.1\pm0.2$ $\mu$K/R and 67.5% dust with $24.0\pm1.0$ $\mu$K/(MJy/sr). Using a lower limit of 10% in the relative uncertainty of the coupling constants, we can constrain the sector contributions of each contaminant in both maps to $< 20$% in 21 (free-free), 19 (dust) and 22 (synchrotron) sectors. At this level, all these sectors are found outside of the $\mid$b$\mid = 14.6^\circ$ region. By performing the same correlation analysis as a function of Galactic scale height, we conclude that the region within $b=\pm17.5^{\circ}$ should be removed from the BEAST maps for CMB studies in order to keep individual Galactic contributions below $\sim 1$% of the map's rms.
  • We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 meter off axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of 6 Q band (40 GHz) and 2 Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 Km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky from declinateion 33 to 42 degrees. The maps cover an area of 2470 square degrees with an effective resolution of 23 arcminutes FWHM at 40 GHz and 30 arcminutes at 30 GHz. The map RMS (smoothed to 30 arcminutes and excluding galactic foregrounds) is 54 +-5 microK at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise gives a cosmic signal RMS contribution of 28 +-3 microK. An estimate of the actual CMB sky signal requires taking into account the l-space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper (O'Dwyer et al. 2003). In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent H$\alpha$ maps (Finkbeiner, 2003). In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms and systematic effects. A detailed description of the experiment appears in Childers et al. (2003).