• A multivariate quantile regression model with a factor structure is proposed to mine data with many responses of interest. The factor structure is allowed to vary with the quantile levels, which makes our framework more flexible than the classical factor models. The model is estimated with the nuclear norm regularization in order to accommodate the high dimensionality of data, but the incurred optimization problem can only be efficiently solved in an approximate manner by off-the-shelf optimization methods. Such a scenario is often seen when the empirical risk is non-smooth or the numerical procedure involves expensive subroutines such as singular value decomposition. To ensure that the approximate estimator accurately estimates the model, sufficient conditions on the optimization error and non-asymptotic error bounds are established to characterize the risk of the proposed estimator. A numerical procedure that provably achieves small approximate error is proposed. The merits of our model and the proposed numerical procedures are demonstrated through Monte Carlo experiments and an application to finance involving a large pool of asset returns.
  • In this article, we develop methods for estimating a low rank tensor from noisy observations on a subset of its entries to achieve both statistical and computational efficiencies. There have been a lot of recent interests in this problem of noisy tensor completion. Much of the attention has been focused on the fundamental computational challenges often associated with problems involving higher order tensors, yet very little is known about their statistical performance. To fill in this void, in this article, we characterize the fundamental statistical limits of noisy tensor completion by establishing minimax optimal rates of convergence for estimating a $k$th order low rank tensor under the general $\ell_p$ ($1\le p\le 2$) norm which suggest significant room for improvement over the existing approaches. Furthermore, we propose a polynomial-time computable estimating procedure based upon power iteration and a second-order spectral initialization that achieves the optimal rates of convergence. Our method is fairly easy to implement and numerical experiments are presented to further demonstrate the practical merits of our estimator.
  • Image demosaicing - one of the most important early stages in digital camera pipelines - addressed the problem of reconstructing a full-resolution image from so-called color-filter-arrays. Despite tremendous progress made in the pase decade, a fundamental issue that remains to be addressed is how to assure the visual quality of reconstructed images especially in the presence of noise corruption. Inspired by recent advances in generative adversarial networks (GAN), we present a novel deep learning approach toward joint demosaicing and denoising (JDD) with perceptual optimization in order to ensure the visual quality of reconstructed images. The key contributions of this work include: 1) we have developed a GAN-based approach toward image demosacing in which a discriminator network with both perceptual and adversarial loss functions are used for quality assurance; 2) we propose to optimize the perceptual quality of reconstructed images by the proposed GAN in an end-to-end manner. Such end-to-end optimization of GAN is particularly effective for jointly exploiting the gain brought by each modular component (e.g., residue learning in the generative network and perceptual loss in the discriminator network). Our extensive experimental results have shown convincingly improved performance over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both subjective and objective quality metrics with a comparable computational cost.
  • In this paper, we study the effect of dependence on detecting sparse signals. In particular, we focus on global testing against sparse alternatives for the means of binary outcomes following an Ising model, and establish how the interplay between the strength and sparsity of a signal determines its detectability under various notions of dependence. The profound impact of dependence is best illustrated under the Curie-Weiss model where we observe the effect of a "thermodynamic" phase transition. In particular, the critical state exhibits a subtle "blessing of dependence" phenomenon in that one can detect much weaker signals at criticality than otherwise. Furthermore, we develop a testing procedure that is broadly applicable to account for dependence and show that it is asymptotically minimax optimal under fairly general regularity conditions.
  • Colocalization is a powerful tool to study the interactions between fluorescently labeled molecules in biological fluorescence microscopy. However, existing techniques for colocalization analysis have not undergone continued development especially in regards to robust statistical support. In this paper, we examine two of the most popular quantification techniques for colocalization and argue that they could be improved upon using ideas from nonparametric statistics and scan statistics. In particular, we propose a new colocalization metric that is robust, easily implementable, and optimal in a rigorous statistical testing framework. Application to several benchmark datasets, as well as biological examples, further demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed technique.
  • The reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) embedding of distributions offers a general and flexible framework for testing problems in arbitrary domains and has attracted considerable amount of attention in recent years. To gain insights into their operating characteristics, we study here the statistical performance of such approaches within a minimax framework. Focusing on the case of goodness-of-fit tests, our analyses show that a vanilla version of the kernel-embedding based test could be suboptimal, and suggest a simple remedy by moderating the embedding. We prove that the moderated approach provides optimal tests for a wide range of deviations from the null and can also be made adaptive over a large collection of interpolation spaces. Numerical experiments are presented to further demonstrate the merits of our approach.
  • Many statistical procedures, including goodness-of-fit tests and methods for independent component analysis, rely critically on the estimation of the entropy of a distribution. In this paper, we seek entropy estimators that are efficient and achieve the local asymptotic minimax lower bound with respect to squared error loss. To this end, we study weighted averages of the estimators originally proposed by Kozachenko and Leonenko (1987), based on the $k$-nearest neighbour distances of a sample of $n$ independent and identically distributed random vectors in $\mathbb{R}^d$. A careful choice of weights enables us to obtain an efficient estimator in arbitrary dimensions, given sufficient smoothness, while the original unweighted estimator is typically only efficient when $d \leq 3$. In addition to the new estimator proposed and theoretical understanding provided, our results facilitate the construction of asymptotically valid confidence intervals for the entropy of asymptotically minimal width.
  • In this paper we present a general convex optimization approach for solving high-dimensional multiple response tensor regression problems under low-dimensional structural assumptions. We consider using convex and weakly decomposable regularizers assuming that the underlying tensor lies in an unknown low-dimensional subspace. Within our framework, we derive general risk bounds of the resulting estimate under fairly general dependence structure among covariates. Our framework leads to upper bounds in terms of two very simple quantities, the \emph{Gaussian width} of a convex set in tensor space and the \emph{intrinsic dimension} of the low-dimensional tensor subspace. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first general framework that applies to multiple response problems. These general bounds provide useful upper bounds on rates of convergence for a number of fundamental statistical models of interest including multi-response regression, vector auto-regressive models, low-rank tensor models and pairwise interaction models. Moreover, in many of these settings we prove that the resulting estimates are minimax optimal. We also provide a numerical study that both validates our theoretical guarantees and demonstrates the breadth of our framework.
  • Spatiotemporal gene expression data of the human brain offer insights on the spa- tial and temporal patterns of gene regulation during brain development. Most existing methods for analyzing these data consider spatial and temporal profiles separately with the implicit assumption that different brain regions develop in similar trajectories, and that the spatial patterns of gene expression remain similar at different time points. Al- though these analyses may help delineate gene regulation either spatially or temporally, they are not able to characterize heterogeneity in temporal dynamics across different brain regions, or the evolution of spatial patterns of gene regulation over time. In this article, we develop a statistical method based on low rank tensor decomposition to more effectively analyze spatiotemporal gene expression data. We generalize the clas- sical principal component analysis (PCA) which is applicable only to data matrices, to tensor PCA that can simultaneously capture spatial and temporal effects. We also propose an efficient algorithm that combines tensor unfolding and power iteration to estimate the tensor principal components, and provide guarantees on their statistical performances. Numerical experiments are presented to further demonstrate the mer- its of the proposed method. An application of our method to a spatiotemporal brain expression data provides insights on gene regulation patterns in the brain.
  • In this paper, we investigate the sample size requirement for exact recovery of a high order tensor of low rank from a subset of its entries. We show that a gradient descent algorithm with initial value obtained from a spectral method can, in particular, reconstruct a ${d\times d\times d}$ tensor of multilinear ranks $(r,r,r)$ with high probability from as few as $O(r^{7/2}d^{3/2}\log^{7/2}d+r^7d\log^6d)$ entries. In the case when the ranks $r=O(1)$, our sample size requirement matches those for nuclear norm minimization (Yuan and Zhang, 2016a), or alternating least squares assuming orthogonal decomposability (Jain and Oh, 2014). Unlike these earlier approaches, however, our method is efficient to compute, easy to implement, and does not impose extra structures on the tensor. Numerical results are presented to further demonstrate the merits of the proposed approach.
  • In this paper, we consider the problem of learning high-dimensional tensor regression problems with low-rank structure. One of the core challenges associated with learning high-dimensional models is computation since the underlying optimization problems are often non-convex. While convex relaxations could lead to polynomial-time algorithms they are often slow in practice. On the other hand, limited theoretical guarantees exist for non-convex methods. In this paper we provide a general framework that provides theoretical guarantees for learning high-dimensional tensor regression models under different low-rank structural assumptions using the projected gradient descent algorithm applied to a potentially non-convex constraint set $\Theta$ in terms of its \emph{localized Gaussian width}. We juxtapose our theoretical results for non-convex projected gradient descent algorithms with previous results on regularized convex approaches. The two main differences between the convex and non-convex approach are: (i) from a computational perspective whether the non-convex projection operator is computable and whether the projection has desirable contraction properties and (ii) from a statistical upper bound perspective, the non-convex approach has a superior rate for a number of examples. We provide three concrete examples of low-dimensional structure which address these issues and explain the pros and cons for the non-convex and convex approaches. We supplement our theoretical results with simulations which show that, under several common settings of generalized low rank tensor regression, the projected gradient descent approach is superior both in terms of statistical error and run-time provided the step-sizes of the projected descent algorithm are suitably chosen.
  • Motivated by gene set enrichment analysis, we investigate the problem of combined hypothesis testing on a graph. We introduce a general framework to effectively use the structural information of the underlying graph when testing multivariate means. A new testing procedure is proposed within this framework. We show that the test is optimal in that it can consistently detect departure from the collective null at a rate that no other test could improve, for almost all graphs. We also provide general performance bounds for the proposed test under any specific graph, and illustrate their utility through several common types of graphs. Numerical experiments are presented to further demonstrate the merits of our approach.
  • In this paper, we investigate the sample size requirement for a general class of nuclear norm minimization methods for higher order tensor completion. We introduce a class of tensor norms by allowing for different levels of coherence, which allows us to leverage the incoherence of a tensor. In particular, we show that a $k$th order tensor of rank $r$ and dimension $d\times\cdots\times d$ can be recovered perfectly from as few as $O((r^{(k-1)/2}d^{3/2}+r^{k-1}d)(\log(d))^2)$ uniformly sampled entries through an appropriate incoherent nuclear norm minimization. Our results demonstrate some key differences between completing a matrix and a higher order tensor: They not only point to potential room for improvement over the usual nuclear norm minimization but also highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for incoherence, when dealing with higher order tensors.
  • Motivated by the problem of colocalization analysis in fluorescence microscopic imaging, we study in this paper structured detection of correlated regions between two random processes observed on a common domain. We argue that although intuitive, direct use of the maximum log-likelihood statistic suffers from potential bias and substantially reduced power, and introduce a simple size-based normalization to overcome this problem. We show that scanning with the proposed size-corrected likelihood ratio statistics leads to optimal correlation detection over a large collection of structured correlation detection problems.
  • Quantum state tomography aims to determine the state of a quantum system as represented by a density matrix. It is a fundamental task in modern scientific studies involving quantum systems. In this paper, we study estimation of high-dimensional density matrices based on Pauli measurements. In particular, under appropriate notion of sparsity, we establish the minimax optimal rates of convergence for estimation of the density matrix under both the spectral and Frobenius norm losses; and show how these rates can be achieved by a common thresholding approach. Numerical performance of the proposed estimator is also investigated.
  • We establish minimax optimal rates of convergence for estimation in a high dimensional additive model assuming that it is approximately sparse. Our results reveal an interesting phase transition behavior universal to this class of high dimensional problems. In the {\it sparse regime} when the components are sufficiently smooth or the dimensionality is sufficiently large, the optimal rates are identical to those for high dimensional linear regression, and therefore there is no additional cost to entertain a nonparametric model. Otherwise, in the so-called {\it smooth regime}, the rates coincide with the optimal rates for estimating a univariate function, and therefore they are immune to the "curse of dimensionality".
  • Although recovering an Euclidean distance matrix from noisy observations is a common problem in practice, how well this could be done remains largely unknown. To fill in this void, we study a simple distance matrix estimate based upon the so-called regularized kernel estimate. We show that such an estimate can be characterized as simply applying a constant amount of shrinkage to all observed pairwise distances. This fact allows us to establish risk bounds for the estimate implying that the true distances can be estimated consistently in an average sense as the number of objects increases. In addition, such a characterization suggests an efficient algorithm to compute the distance matrix estimator, as an alternative to the usual second order cone programming known not to scale well for large problems. Numerical experiments and an application in visualizing the diversity of Vpu protein sequences from a recent HIV-1 study further demonstrate the practical merits of the proposed method.
  • Motivated by a range of applications in engineering and genomics, we consider in this paper detection of very short signal segments in three settings: signals with known shape, arbitrary signals, and smooth signals. Optimal rates of detection are established for the three cases and rate-optimal detectors are constructed. The detectors are easily implementable and are based on scanning with linear and quadratic statistics. Our analysis reveals both similarities and differences in the strategy and fundamental difficulty of detection among these three settings.
  • Discussion of "A significance test for the lasso" by Richard Lockhart, Jonathan Taylor, Ryan J. Tibshirani, Robert Tibshirani [arXiv:1301.7161].
  • Many problems can be formulated as recovering a low-rank tensor. Although an increasingly common task, tensor recovery remains a challenging problem because of the delicacy associated with the decomposition of higher order tensors. To overcome these difficulties, existing approaches often proceed by unfolding tensors into matrices and then apply techniques for matrix completion. We show here that such matricization fails to exploit the tensor structure and may lead to suboptimal procedure. More specifically, we investigate a convex optimization approach to tensor completion by directly minimizing a tensor nuclear norm and prove that this leads to an improved sample size requirement. To establish our results, we develop a series of algebraic and probabilistic techniques such as characterization of subdifferetial for tensor nuclear norm and concentration inequalities for tensor martingales, which may be of independent interests and could be useful in other tensor related problems.
  • Clustering methods have led to a number of important discoveries in bioinformatics and beyond. A major challenge in their use is determining which clusters represent important underlying structure, as opposed to spurious sampling artifacts. This challenge is especially serious, and very few methods are available when the data are very high in dimension. Statistical Significance of Clustering (SigClust) is a recently developed cluster evaluation tool for high dimensional low sample size data. An important component of the SigClust approach is the very definition of a single cluster as a subset of data sampled from a multivariate Gaussian distribution. The implementation of SigClust requires the estimation of the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix for the null multivariate Gaussian distribution. We show that the original eigenvalue estimation can lead to a test that suffers from severe inflation of type-I error, in the important case where there are huge single spikes in the eigenvalues. This paper addresses this critical challenge using a novel likelihood based soft thresholding approach to estimate these eigenvalues which leads to a much improved SigClust. These major improvements in SigClust performance are shown by both theoretical work and an extensive simulation study. Applications to some cancer genomic data further demonstrate the usefulness of these improvements.
  • The problem of multiple kernel learning based on penalized empirical risk minimization is discussed. The complexity penalty is determined jointly by the empirical $L_2$ norms and the reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) norms induced by the kernels with a data-driven choice of regularization parameters. The main focus is on the case when the total number of kernels is large, but only a relatively small number of them is needed to represent the target function, so that the problem is sparse. The goal is to establish oracle inequalities for the excess risk of the resulting prediction rule showing that the method is adaptive both to the unknown design distribution and to the sparsity of the problem.
  • We study in this paper a smoothness regularization method for functional linear regression and provide a unified treatment for both the prediction and estimation problems. By developing a tool on simultaneous diagonalization of two positive definite kernels, we obtain shaper results on the minimax rates of convergence and show that smoothness regularized estimators achieve the optimal rates of convergence for both prediction and estimation under conditions weaker than those for the functional principal components based methods developed in the literature. Despite the generality of the method of regularization, we show that the procedure is easily implementable. Numerical results are obtained to illustrate the merits of the method and to demonstrate the theoretical developments.
  • Discussion of "Latent variable graphical model selection via convex optimization" by Venkat Chandrasekaran, Pablo A. Parrilo and Alan S. Willsky [arXiv:1008.1290].
  • Estimation of large covariance matrices has drawn considerable recent attention, and the theoretical focus so far has mainly been on developing a minimax theory over a fixed parameter space. In this paper, we consider adaptive covariance matrix estimation where the goal is to construct a single procedure which is minimax rate optimal simultaneously over each parameter space in a large collection. A fully data-driven block thresholding estimator is proposed. The estimator is constructed by carefully dividing the sample covariance matrix into blocks and then simultaneously estimating the entries in a block by thresholding. The estimator is shown to be optimally rate adaptive over a wide range of bandable covariance matrices. A simulation study is carried out and shows that the block thresholding estimator performs well numerically. Some of the technical tools developed in this paper can also be of independent interest.