• This paper investigates the synthesis of distributed economic control algorithms under which dynamically coupled physical systems are regulated to a variational equilibrium of a constrained convex game. We study two complementary cases: (i) each subsystem is linear and controllable; and (ii) each subsystem is nonlinear and in the strict-feedback form. The convergence of the proposed algorithms is guaranteed using Lyapunov analysis. Their performance is verified by two case studies on a multi-zone building temperature regulation problem and an optimal power flow problem, respectively.
  • This paper investigates the frequency control of multi-machine power systems subject to uncertain and dynamic net loads. We propose distributed internal model controllers which coordinate synchronous generators and demand response to tackle the unpredictable nature of net loads. Frequency stability is formally guaranteed via Lyapunov analysis. Numerical simulations on the IEEE 68-bus test system demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers.
  • This paper studies how a system operator and a set of agents securely execute a distributed projected gradient-based algorithm. In particular, each participant holds a set of problem coefficients and/or states whose values are private to the data owner. The concerned problem raises two questions: how to securely compute given functions; and which functions should be computed in the first place. For the first question, by using the techniques of homomorphic encryption, we propose novel algorithms which can achieve secure multiparty computation with perfect correctness. For the second question, we identify a class of functions which can be securely computed. The correctness and computational efficiency of the proposed algorithms are verified by two case studies of power systems, one on a demand response problem and the other on an optimal power flow problem.
  • This technical report provides the description and the derivation of a novel nonlinear unknown input and state estimation algorithm (NUISE) for mobile robots. The algorithm is designed for real-world robots with nonlinear dynamic models and subject to stochastic noises on sensing and actuation. Leveraging sensor readings and planned control commands, the algorithm detects and quantifies anomalies on both sensors and actuators. Later, we elaborate the dynamic models of two distinctive mobile robots for the purpose of demonstrating the application of NUISE. This report serves as a supplementary document for [1].
  • This paper studies a class of multi-robot coordination problems where a team of robots aim to reach their goal regions with minimum time and avoid collisions with obstacles and other robots. A novel numerical algorithm is proposed to identify the Pareto optimal solutions where no robot can unilaterally reduce its traveling time without extending others'. The consistent approximation of the algorithm in the epigraphical profile sense is guaranteed using set-valued numerical analysis. Simulations show the anytime property and increasing optimality of the proposed algorithm.
  • Mobile robots are cyber-physical systems where the cyberspace and the physical world are strongly coupled. Attacks against mobile robots can transcend cyber defenses and escalate into disastrous consequences in the physical world. In this paper, we focus on the detection of active attacks that are capable of directly influencing robot mission operation. Through leveraging physical dynamics of mobile robots, we develop RIDS, a novel robot intrusion detection system that can detect actuator attacks as well as sensor attacks for nonlinear mobile robots subject to stochastic noises. We implement and evaluate a RIDS on Khepera mobile robot against concrete attack scenarios via various attack channels including signal interference, sensor spoofing, logic bomb, and physical damage. Evaluation of 20 experiments shows that the averages of false positive rates and false negative rates are both below 1%. Average detection delay for each attack remains within 0.40s.
  • In this paper, we consider the problem of attack-resilient state estimation, that is to reliably estimate the true system states despite two classes of attacks: (i) attacks on the switching mechanisms and (ii) false data injection attacks on actuator and sensor signals, in the presence of unbounded stochastic process and measurement noise signals. We model the systems under attack as hidden mode stochastic switched linear systems with unknown inputs and propose the use of a multiple-model inference algorithm to tackle these security issues. Moreover, we characterize fundamental limitations to resilient estimation (e.g., upper bound on the number of tolerable signal attacks) and discuss the topics of attack detection, identification and mitigation under this framework. Simulation examples of switching and false data injection attacks on a benchmark system and an IEEE 68-bus test system show the efficacy of our approach to recover resilient (i.e., asymptotically unbiased) state estimates as well as to identify and mitigate the attacks.
  • This paper studies attack-resilient estimation of a class of switched nonlinear systems subject to stochastic noises. The systems are threatened by both of signal attacks and switching attacks. The problem is formulated as the joint estimation of states, attack vectors and modes of hidden-mode switched systems. We propose an estimation algorithm which is composed of a bank of state and attack vector estimators and a mode estimator. The mode estimator selects the most likely mode based on modes' posterior probabilities induced by the discrepancies between obtained outputs and predicted outputs. We formally analyze the stability of estimation errors in probability for the proposed estimator associated with the true mode when the hidden mode is time-invariant but remains unknown. For hidden-mode switched linear systems, we discuss a way to reduce computational complexity which originates from unknown signal attack locations. Lastly, we present numerical simulations on the IEEE 68-bus test system to show the estimator performance for time-varying modes with a regular mode set and a reduced mode set.
  • In this paper, we address energy management for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings, and present a novel combined optimization and control approach. We first formulate a thermal dynamics and an associated optimization problem. An optimization dynamics is then designed based on a standard primal-dual algorithm, and its strict passivity is proved. We then design a local controller and prove that the physical dynamics with the controller is ensured to be passivity-short. Based on these passivity results, we interconnect the optimization and physical dynamics, and prove convergence of the room temperatures to the optimal ones defined for unmeasurable disturbances. Finally, we demonstrate the present algorithms through simulation.
  • This paper investigates a class of multi-player discrete games where each player aims to maximize its own utility function. Two particular challenges are considered. Firstly, each player is unaware of the structure of its utility function and the actions of other players, but is able to access the corresponding utility value given an action profile. Second, utility values are subject to delays and errors. We propose a robust adaptive learning algorithm which converges in probability to the set of action profiles which have maximal stochastic potential. Furthermore, the convergence rate of the proposed algorithm is quantified. When the interactions of the players consist of a weakly acyclic game, the convergence to the set of pure Nash equilibria is guaranteed. A set of numerical simulations are conducted to validate the algorithm performance.
  • In this paper, we present an optimal filter for linear time-varying continuous-time stochastic systems that simultaneously estimates the states and unknown inputs in an unbiased minimum-variance sense. We first show that the unknown inputs cannot be estimated without additional assumptions. Then, we discuss two complementary variants of the filter: (i) for the case when an additional measurement containing information about the state derivative is available, and (ii) for the case without the additional measurement but the input signals are assumed to be sufficiently smooth and have bounded derivatives. Conditions for uniform asymptotic stability and the existence of a steady-state solution for the proposed filter, as well as the convergence rate of the state and input estimate biases are given. Moreover, we show that a principle of separation of estimation and control holds and that the unknown inputs may be rejected. Two examples, including a nonlinear vehicle reentry example, are given to illustrate that our filter is applicable even when some strong assumptions do not hold.
  • In this paper, we propose a filtering algorithm for simultaneously estimating the mode, input and state of hidden mode switched linear stochastic systems with unknown inputs. Using a multiple-model approach with a bank of linear input and state filters for each mode, our algorithm relies on the ability to find the most probable model as a mode estimate, which we show is possible with input and state filters by identifying a key property, that a particular residual signal we call generalized innovation is a Gaussian white noise. We also provide an asymptotic analysis for the proposed algorithm and provide sufficient conditions for asymptotically achieving convergence to the true model (consistency), or to the 'closest' model according to an information-theoretic measure (convergence). A simulation example of intention-aware vehicles at an intersection is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.
  • This paper considers a class of generalized convex games where each player is associated with a convex objective function, a convex inequality constraint and a convex constraint set. The players aim to compute a Nash equilibrium through communicating with neighboring players. The particular challenge we consider is that the component functions are unknown a priori to associated players. We study two distributed computation algorithms and analyze their convergence properties in the presence of data transmission delays and dynamic changes of network topologies. The algorithm performance is verified through demand response on the IEEE 30-bus Test System. Our technical tools integrate convex analysis, variational inequalities and simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation.
  • In this paper, we present a unified optimal and exponentially stable filter for linear discrete-time stochastic systems that simultaneously estimates the states and unknown inputs in an unbiased minimum-variance sense, without making any assumptions on the direct feedthrough matrix. We also derive input and state observability/detectability conditions, and analyze their connection to the convergence and stability of the estimator. We discuss two variations of the filter and their optimality and stability properties, and show that filters in the literature, including the Kalman filter, are special cases of the filter derived in this paper. Finally, illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the unified unbiased minimum-variance filter.
  • We consider a class of multi-robot motion planning problems where each robot is associated with multiple objectives and decoupled task specifications. The problems are formulated as an open-loop non-cooperative differential game. A distributed anytime algorithm is proposed to compute a Nash equilibrium of the game. The following properties are proven: (i) the algorithm asymptotically converges to the set of Nash equilibrium; (ii) for scalar cost functionals, the price of stability equals one; (iii) for the worst case, the computational complexity and communication cost are linear in the robot number.
  • This paper studies a class of approach-evasion differential games, in which one player aims to steer the state of a dynamic system to the given target set in minimum time, while avoiding some set of disallowed states, and the other player desires to achieve the opposite. We propose a class of novel anytime computation algorithms, analyze their convergence properties and verify their performance via a number of numerical simulations. Our algorithms significantly outperform the multi-grid method for the approach-evasion differential games both theoretically and numerically. Our technical approach leverages incremental sampling in robotic motion planning and viability theory.
  • This paper studies a resilient control problem for discrete-time, linear time-invariant systems subject to state and input constraints. State measurements and control commands are transmitted over a communication network and could be corrupted by adversaries. In particular, we consider the replay attackers who maliciously repeat the messages sent from the operator to the actuator. We propose a variation of the receding-horizon control law to deal with the replay attacks and analyze the resulting system performance degradation. A class of competitive (resp. cooperative) resource allocation problems for resilient networked control systems is also investigated.
  • This paper considers competitive mobility-on-demand systems where a group of vehicle sharing companies, on one hand, want to collectively regulate the traffic of the user queueing network, and on the other hand, maximize their own profits at each time instant. We formulate the strategic interconnection among the companies as a real-time game theoretic coordination problem. We propose an algorithm to achieve vehicle balance and practical regulation of the user queueing network. We quantify the relation between the regulation error and the system parameters (e.g., the maximum variation of the user arrival rates).
  • We consider a multi-agent optimization problem where agents subject to local, intermittent interactions aim to minimize a sum of local objective functions subject to a global inequality constraint and a global state constraint set. In contrast to previous work, we do not require that the objective, constraint functions, and state constraint sets to be convex. In order to deal with time-varying network topologies satisfying a standard connectivity assumption, we resort to consensus algorithm techniques and the Lagrangian duality method. We slightly relax the requirement of exact consensus, and propose a distributed approximate dual subgradient algorithm to enable agents to asymptotically converge to a pair of primal-dual solutions to an approximate problem. To guarantee convergence, we assume that the Slater's condition is satisfied and the optimal solution set of the dual limit is singleton. We implement our algorithm over a source localization problem and compare the performance with existing algorithms.
  • We consider a general multi-agent convex optimization problem where the agents are to collectively minimize a global objective function subject to a global inequality constraint, a global equality constraint, and a global constraint set. The objective function is defined by a sum of local objective functions, while the global constraint set is produced by the intersection of local constraint sets. In particular, we study two cases: one where the equality constraint is absent, and the other where the local constraint sets are identical. We devise two distributed primal-dual subgradient algorithms which are based on the characterization of the primal-dual optimal solutions as the saddle points of the Lagrangian and penalty functions. These algorithms can be implemented over networks with changing topologies but satisfying a standard connectivity property, and allow the agents to asymptotically agree on optimal solutions and optimal values of the optimization problem under the Slater's condition.
  • We come up with a class of distributed quantized averaging algorithms on asynchronous communication networks with fixed, switching and random topologies. The implementation of these algorithms is subject to the realistic constraint that the communication rate, the memory capacities of agents and the computation precision are finite. The focus of this paper is on the study of the convergence time of the proposed quantized averaging algorithms. By appealing to random walks on graphs, we derive polynomial bounds on the expected convergence time of the algorithms presented.
  • Motivated by current challenges in data-intensive sensor networks, we formulate a coverage optimization problem for mobile visual sensors as a (constrained) repeated multi-player game. Each visual sensor tries to optimize its own coverage while minimizing the processing cost. We present two distributed learning algorithms where each sensor only remembers its own utility values and actions played during the last plays. These algorithms are proven to be convergent in probability to the set of (constrained) Nash equilibria and global optima of certain coverage performance metric, respectively.